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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by Preemptive View Post
    It may be superstition, but I've an idea in my head that having wifi on may help
    It's not superstition, I started a thread https://forums.webosnation.com/palm-...t-working.html back in 2014 when my GLS mysteriously quit working, which as you pointed out here seriously hinders GPS operation. With the help of people like TJ, I realized that GLS seemed to be working fine for other people, just not for me. I never did figure out why it quit working, but a couple of months later it magically returned.

    You can read the gory details in my earlier thread, but the bottom line is, I found and shared a work around posted on another website ... that work around involved disabling GPS and GLS, then turning on your WiFi radio, no connection needed just turn on the radio, then turn your GPS back on ... it worked every time.
  2. #42  
    OK, we know the GPS system is still working. This thread is about the IP location system. This is how to get a rough location via wifi when indoors or waiting for the GPS to lock on. Looking back over the thread, it seems that webOS has a location service. I'm not clear if it's a single service or two, but the result is that the IP service can deliver a rough fix and the GPS is prioritised when available for a more accurate fix.

    We know that George Mari has found a way to fix the Homebrew Googlemaps app, but as the pricing structure for access to the API has changed, this means each user must apply for a developer key and 'personalise' the app. A single built in key might get enough requests from users that the developer gets hit with a large bill...

    So...
    1. Is there a central webOS service (or two) that connects to Google & the GPS sensor to deliver location data to a requesting app?
    2. Or can each app make it's own request to [whatever] location service, using the webOS service only for GPS data?
    3. Or both of the above?

    It seem to me that it would be easier if an individual app just requested a service from the system, but it maybe that 2 or 3 are also true. Where only 2 is true, then each app would need to be fixed if the service API (Google in most cases I guess) changed. If it's a central service, then we only need to fix the webOS service to make all apps work. We could, for instance all request dev keys from google and paste them into an API patch for the webOS location service. The other (ideal?) option is to be able to select from a list of services from other providers. Of course if google is 'hard-coded' in, then it's a bigger fix to create the possible options.

    It's possible that other services are less accurate than Google's, but may be considered good enough if they are free to use and the hassle of signing up to be a developer is likely a step too far for many users.

    I assume that the following have an IP location service available:
    • Mozilla
    • Bingmaps
    • Here
    • (probably not open) Apple
    Last edited by Preemptive; 05/11/2019 at 03:32 PM.
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by Preemptive View Post
    This thread is about the IP location system
    I don't believe that WebOS ever used any kind of an IP location system, it was all based on cell tower location, unless you call that IP. In our location services menu there are two options, GPS and GLS. Back in 2014 when I was having trouble with GLS I looked into this extensively. At the time TJ confirmed that, on his Pre 2, when he turned off GPS, GLS would locate him at the nearest cell tower. When I found the work around mentioned in my previous thread I did some experimenting. After my GLS suddenly started working again, I tried to figure out exactly what it did. As before, with GPS turned off, GLS would locate me at the nearest cell tower, if I put the phone in airplane mode and then turned on WiFi separately and connected to a router, GLS would no longer work. I'm pretty sure it has nothing to do with IP address other than what the service provider gives you from their cell tower, and that's what Google used for their GLS system, at least on WebOS. I know quite a bit about how GPS works, and if you have GPS turned on in our WebOS location service, the only reason it wanted a rough location from GLS was so that it could use that information to do the math and find the satellites quicker. Of course if you had GPS turned off and GLS turned on, it would locate you at the nearest cell tower and use that rough information for location based services, but it was very rough.

    In my previous post here I was simply confirming that your "superstition" was in fact correct. Turning on the WiFi radio does in fact wake up the GPS receiver on the Pre 2, for some reason. Now that I'm on the Pre 3 I no longer worry about that, I've never even turned on GLS, GPS works fine and very quickly without it.
  4. #44  
    Google Location Service would correlate a WiFi access point list and corresponding signal strength for each SSID with computed estimates of the locations of each access point that are based on locations other devices have reported. Google then uses all of this data to triangulate your nearest position. I suspect if you are using Google and it is showing you a location of a cellular tower it is because some device was reporting that as the GPS coordinates when it reported a list of nearby access points.

    The API endpoint that Google Location Services used to work off of is no longer active. It used Google's Protocol Buffers to serialize the data objects into a compressed packet.

    com.palm.location would talk to the Google Location Service for wifi based locating, and it would also speak to the TIL (telephony interface layer) to get GPS coordinates from that (using either the modem's GPS, or A-GPS from the carrier -- which generally would be a way for the modem's GPS to search a narrow selection of GPS satellites using an almanac instead of trying to scan everything). I think if there was a GPS card in a TouchPad either com.palm.location would handle that, or the TIL would still do that (haven't ever played with that setup).

    My thought for a replacement to com.palm.location would be a service at that address that was 100% plugin based. You'd have a plugin for phone GPS, a plugin for BT GPS, a plugin for some other GPS, an plugins for whatever wifi location services you wanted (I'd probably personally pick Mozilla). The benefit there is that if something changes you just have to re-write the plugin and not the whole bloody service! D-:
    Did you know:

    webOS ran on a Treo 800 during initial development.
    Preemptive likes this.
  5. #45  
    That makes sense, though I suspect creating the plugin system maybe the big job...

    I'm wondering if a hard patch to... say, Mozilla is the quick and dirty solution. Maybe a plugin system is for LuneOS, perhaps back-ported if any legacy devices are still working by then.

    As a side-note: It seems the LuneOS GPS still doesn't work. I wonder if it's the system or a driver thing?
    Last edited by Preemptive; 05/13/2019 at 09:20 PM.
  6. #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by Preemptive View Post
    That makes sense, though I suspect creating the plugin system maybe the big job...

    I'm wondering if a hard patch to... say, Mozilla is the quick and dirty solution. Maybe a plugin system is for LuneOS, perhaps back-ported if any legacy devices are still working by then.

    As a side-note: It seems the LuneOS GPS still doesn't work. I wonder if it's the system or a driver thing?
    Well we have a location service that can use either Google or Mozilla. Based on my experience the Google one is a lot more accurate. GPS just wasn't hooked up yet, but shouldn't be rocket science since we have all the bits in place technically.
    HP Veer (daily driver), HP Pre 3, HP Touchpad Proper 4G/LTE (Sierra MC7710), HP Touchpad 32GB WiFi, Palm Pre 2
    Preemptive likes this.
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by Herrie View Post
    Well we have a location service that can use either Google or Mozilla. Based on my experience the Google one is a lot more accurate. GPS just wasn't hooked up yet, but shouldn't be rocket science since we have all the bits in place technically.
    Through GeoClue, right? I hadn't really looked at GeoClue, but kinda just did now. It looks interesting. I see it has config files. I wonder if it has a more dynamic config that uses a database? (For permissions and such.)
    Did you know:

    webOS ran on a Treo 800 during initial development.
    Preemptive likes this.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by dkirker View Post
    Through GeoClue, right? I hadn't really looked at GeoClue, but kinda just did now. It looks interesting. I see it has config files. I wonder if it has a more dynamic config that uses a database? (For permissions and such.)
    Yeah GeoClue as backend. We have a direct LS2 service and one via QtLocation that is used by the browser if I'm correct.

    Sent from my Redmi Note 4 using Tapatalk
    HP Veer (daily driver), HP Pre 3, HP Touchpad Proper 4G/LTE (Sierra MC7710), HP Touchpad 32GB WiFi, Palm Pre 2
    Preemptive likes this.
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