View Poll Results: Do you trust your data in the cloud?

Voters
63. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    11 17.46%
  • Sometimes, depending on the company hosting a service

    15 23.81%
  • Sometimes, I just try to keep a minimal amount of personal info or non-critical info online.

    24 38.10%
  • Not at all

    13 20.63%
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. ads
    ads is offline
    ads's Avatar
    Posts
    71 Posts
    Global Posts
    172 Global Posts
    #21  
    The quoted post is true. Even large corp security knows *individual* practices or disgruntled folks are largest corp risk.

    I've had corps lose old tape backup with personal info (offered to buy identity theft coverage for a year), my wife and son just had their cards and pins re-issued (but not me, same credit union) due to a breach. Thing is, usually corps, NOWADAYS - not a year or two ago, admit and fix or insure or whatever, after a few got burned for hiding their lapses, most are now up-front. If you screw up yourself, you're hosed in most cases.
    Some of us are techies and understand, but think about it:
    Are all your phones/pda's set to lock quickly and require a password? Do you change your passwords every 3-6 months like religion AND not use trivial, real word passwords? Is your screensaver at work set to lock screen within a 10-15 minutes max of inactivity? Do you own and use a crosscut shredder?
    Many folks state, "don't trust clouds, gov, whatever", but even many of us that know better don't do all we should at the most vulnerable level, the personal level !
    I've often joked, if I wanted to break into some corp entity, I'd join the cleaning service. Access to locked places, workers assume you don't know/use technology so you can shoot the breeze and watch their password over the back!
    I'm looking forward to the cloud, but I sure as heck won't be storing $ account info there! That's MY level of risk tolerance!

    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    A single home user with data is far less of an attractive target when compared with a larger service holding data for masses of people.

    Most home users that have their data compromised typically made some of the most basic mistakes when it comes to cyber security. While larger corporations have teams of paid security employees and are still compromised by the most savvy of hackers with bad intentions.

    And THEN there's the stuff the companies just compromise on their own!!!
  2. #22  
    I'm more or less a believer in internet services--there is a lot more data out there that doesn't get compromised than does. And not having your personal data out there really isn't an option, well, at least not if you have a SSN and file taxes every year.

    However, when it comes to things like client data, you might not want to take the risk.

    Nobody really knows at the moment, but it is counter-intuitive to suggest that just because a file exists on the Pre that it will also exist in the cloud. Palm has really only talked about syncing messaging and PIM-type data with the cloud, not so much documents or other types of data. I think it's quite likely that you'll continue to be able to keep most of the data on your phone relatively secure (unless someone is able to hack into your phone, but with a linux skeleton, it's probably more secure than WinMo). I would envision an area in the phone storage that you access directly from your computer via the included USB cable where you can put files, and which is also accessible to applications on the phone. Sync happens via drag and drop.

    But all is speculation at this point. It wouldn't be bad for Palm to release some more information on all of this. These are major paradigm shifts, and Palm needs to start training its future customers now.
  3. #23  
    We all have an opinion on "the cloud" but regardless of any of our views on the security aspects, here's something else to consider.

    With the press to make more used of "the cloud" for whatever the use. It opens an opportunity for companies to tack on fees in time. As the economy tightens some things currently free may soon have a fee.

    So I see the Pre as being a device that presses people to utilize the "cloud" more heavily and that in turn gives corporations a golden opportunity to make money off you. More monthly fee based services.

    So to me, keeping things off the cloud might also save money.

    And even if no fees, it certainly means more annoying ads .
  4. #24  
    Fair point, jbg. Perhaps DocsToGo will continue as a standalone desktop app and conduit to the Pre. If those guys were on the ball, they'd add a PIM desktop app now!
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    We all have an opinion on "the cloud" but regardless of any of our views on the security aspects, here's something else to consider.

    With the press to make more used of "the cloud" for whatever the use. It opens an opportunity for companies to tack on fees in time. As the economy tightens some things currently free may soon have a fee.

    So I see the Pre as being a device that presses people to utilize the "cloud" more heavily and that in turn gives corporations a golden opportunity to make money off you. More monthly fee based services.

    So to me, keeping things off the cloud might also save money.

    And even if no fees, it certainly means more annoying ads .
    Maybe in the future, but it's too soon for paid Clouds to be common IMO. One paid version, Mobile Me, fails so badly in many people's eyes that if anyone else tries that, they'd better have all their ducks in a row before charging!! Even if they end up charging less, after the failures of MM, people may be reluctant to pay yet another company for more possible failure. People took the plunge because they likely thought Apple is reputable, but they got burned. So people may be more cautious before doing that again.

    I don't know if MSFT and Google will eventually start charging but if they do and servers go down and info gets lost like with MM, imagine the uproar. We already saw what can happen on Google.

    Clouds likely will go paid after they prove they're stable and secure on a long term basis. But after reading all the MM mishaps, I don't think I'd pay anyone yet.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  6. WhoAmI's Avatar
    Posts
    229 Posts
    Global Posts
    257 Global Posts
    #26  
    The main problem with the cloud is not only security but who owns your data?! Who's to keep company X from selling your personal data or claiming something as theirs?

    Remember Facebook who just recently tried to say that all data you put up was theirs? Yikes!
    --WhoAmI--
    Sprint Palm Treo 700p with MR --> Palm Pre

    T-Money is now available for the webOS! Financial planning has never been easier.
  7. #27  
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by WhoAmI View Post
    The main problem with the cloud is not only security but who owns your data?! Who's to keep company X from selling your personal data or claiming something as theirs?

    Remember Facebook who just recently tried to say that all data you put up was theirs? Yikes!
    That's a form of security concern to me. What they might do with the data themselves.

    There's an old saying, want something done right, do it yourself.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    A single home user with data is far less of an attractive target when compared with a larger service holding data for masses of people.
    This used to be the rule. Back when privacy concerns were having phones tapped, the fear on privacy used to be almost an egotistical statement -- as if one hour of your time were important enough for an hour of someone else's time to listen.

    Nowadays it costs literally pennies to aggregate and store all your health information which can be used against your grandchildrens' interests. It costs literally pennies to aggregate all your buying decisions, your web activities, what kind of porn you like and your politics.

    The discounts you get at the supermarket and the drug store for using your identification number have a cost, you save the privacy tax, but you lose privacy.

    So I would say yes, credit card number databases are more of an attractive target, but individuals actiities and transactions long ago passed the point where they are attractive enough on cost/benefit by licit and illicit data aggregators for the miniscule cost of getting and keeping information on what we do.

    It isn't about looking back as you walk down the block for the guys in fedoras, it is about the fact that it costs a nickel to store millions of activities, habits, and transactions and keep them and sell them to whoever you want.
  10. #30  
    Aero, I was speaking of data maintained on a personal PC versus with an online service.

    Things done in interaction with outside parties like shopping are about as secure/insecure as "the cloud".
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions