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  1.    #1  
    Why is webOS the one touchscreen OS that doesn't seem to take advantage of Press & holding something to bring up a small menu of options. Pressing and holding on an email in an inbox to reply, forward, move or report spam. And why can't we designate a spam folder so it's easier to take care of spam? Press and hold a contact to automatically dial the default number. Do we even have default numbers? I constantly wonder why a fax number is my first option when texting. And why it even shows is beyond me. Press and hold a url to copy, insert in email or text (though isn't that a patch? I forget offhand.). Press and hold on selected text could bring up an editing menu.

    It was one of those frustrating things when I switched from Android back to webOS. Not having that ability when I kept trying for it.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  2. #2  
    Lots of good points here. The touch-and-hold gesture is one that should definitely be used - why do we have to open the keyboard, hold Orange and then click an image to save it from the web?

    The BlackBerry Storm had a nice feature in its email client where if you hold down on an email subject or contact name a little progress bar began to build - if it reached the top then something happened. I think the 'circular progress bar' from WebOS would be a great way to get feedback about if/when something is going to happen when touching and holding.
  3. #3  
    Could have to do with a patent on that particular "gesture".
  4. #4  
    Some apps do use the "hold" gesture to get some menus or function buttons to appear (or float up). Particularly the bookreaders (pReader and Kobo) make good use of this.

    It has problems ...

    - it's not necessarily obvious what it does, and for menus it's "hidden" if you don't know it's there. Kobo, in particular, had a lot of negative reviews from users who didn't realize you had to touch-hold the screen to get to the bookmark function.

    - to use it for menus you need an area that's not otherwise touch enabled. "Viewer" type apps (video player, bookreader) are good for this, but not apps with a lot of "active" data (names, phone numbers, addresses).
  5. #5  
    How intuitive it is I think very much depends on the context. Maps are touch-obvious -- scrolling, zooming, etc. Google Maps really needs that function. I so miss that from my WinMO phone. *trying not to start another Google-Maps-on-the-Pre rant.
  6.    #6  
    it has problems? you mean clueless users who like to complain about an intuitive feature they didn't know was there? that argument just makes zero sense and should be followed up with a "oh, that's much easier than having to go into another menu. sorry, but it's not hard to figure out especially when many other touch based systems have that feature.

    and it's perfect active data. That's when you want it. an email adr is highlighted, you can press and hold and get the option to save to contacts, send an email or copy to clipboard. Same thing with a phone number. Or if you just highlight text you can then press and hold on it to bring up editing features. Would work really well especially in replacing a block of text with a block of text you had on the clipboard.

    Pressing and holding on an application icon could bring up hide and trash options. how easy would that make for deleting apps.

    if you had locations on a map you could press and hold to bring up "drive to, add as a waypoint, save to contacts, insert into email and so on."

    I really don't see the downside outside of uninformed users and from the way you described the problems, I don't think you've had that capability on your previous devices.

    Quote Originally Posted by davis.rob View Post
    Some apps do use the "hold" gesture to get some menus or function buttons to appear (or float up). Particularly the bookreaders (pReader and Kobo) make good use of this.

    It has problems ...

    - it's not necessarily obvious what it does, and for menus it's "hidden" if you don't know it's there. Kobo, in particular, had a lot of negative reviews from users who didn't realize you had to touch-hold the screen to get to the bookmark function.

    - to use it for menus you need an area that's not otherwise touch enabled. "Viewer" type apps (video player, bookreader) are good for this, but not apps with a lot of "active" data (names, phone numbers, addresses).
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  7. stubbs's Avatar
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    #7  
    It is used some, like to rearrange icons. I do agree that it would be nice to see it more widely used.. it could replace the orange+tap in quite a few cases, and not require an open keyboard.

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