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  1. #21  
    That means this app is really a perfect template app to give yourself a nice launcher for any thing you want that currently has no launcher. Like your own scripts to set up masquerading (tethering without a dumb tethering app), VisualBoyAdvance gameboy emulator, that new SDL terminal, etc..
    Code:
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  2. SirWill's Avatar
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    #22  
    Wonder if the ipkg of this should be removed until it's using the upstart method so that someone can't harvest the code and make something harmful.
    -----------------
    Palm III, Palm IIIc, TT, T3, T5, TX, Pre from Day 1.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by KEYofR View Post
    That means this app is really a perfect template app to give yourself a nice launcher for any thing you want that currently has no launcher. Like your own scripts to set up masquerading (tethering without a dumb tethering app), VisualBoyAdvance gameboy emulator, that new SDL terminal, etc..
    Yep. Just be aware that it is guaranteed that this technique will break in a future version of webOS when Palm close the loophole to allow public submissions of type:game into the app catalog.

    -- Rod
    WebOS Internals and Preware Founder and Developer
    You may wish to donate by Paypal to donations @ webos-internals.org if you find our work useful.
    All donations go back into development.
    www.webos-internals.org twitter.com/webosinternals facebook.com/webosinternals
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by SirWill View Post
    Wonder if the ipkg of this should be removed until it's using the upstart method so that someone can't harvest the code and make something harmful.
    For anyone who is determined to use this technique maliciously, the information on how to do it is widely known, and simple to implement. Removing this ipkg will have no impact on those determined to get malware onto your Pre (whether or not there are people actually trying to do that is a separate question).

    There is a reason why Palm does not allow installation of ipkgs from random URLs - it is so they can pull the link to an application if it is found to be rogue.

    IMHO, Homebrew should follow the same model, and remove the capability to easily install random ipkgs from untrusted sources. This is the reason why you cannot do this with Preware.

    Again, none of this discussion is referring to the specific app in this thread (which is perfectly safe) or it's author (who is a respected member of the development community).

    -- Rod
    WebOS Internals and Preware Founder and Developer
    You may wish to donate by Paypal to donations @ webos-internals.org if you find our work useful.
    All donations go back into development.
    www.webos-internals.org twitter.com/webosinternals facebook.com/webosinternals
  5. Saundra23's Avatar
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    #25  
    Thanks sooo much!!! now I can wait on buying a new battery .. since the current one slows time.
    Pre user since summer '09...on my fourth phone.
  6. mscemt's Avatar
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    #26  
    Thank you so much! My pre has never kept accurate time and cycling airplane mode is a huge annoyance. I've been looking for an app or patch like this for a long time. I'd love to see the more advanced options in the future but for now this works great!
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by TBH View Post
    Fantastic! Looking forward to downloading it!
    Is it possible to run it periodically, say, every hour? Via cron?
    This software may detect and at least partially compensate for clock drift if it's consistently one way or the other.

    EDIT: Yes, my memory was correct in that the system will calculate your clock drift over time. See this link for the details. Usually the NTP server(s) chosen will automatically set up a polling interval. It will be simplest just to start with the default, and you'll likely find that this is accurate even from day one. You should be able to do some manual updates from the command line in WOSQI or in a "terminal" window on the phone (if you have that). (So cron won't be necessary.)
    Last edited by sudoer; 01/15/2010 at 09:24 AM.
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  8. uk-pre's Avatar
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    #28  
    Awesome application, needed badly for the o2 users. Thanks.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by bclancy View Post
    This software may detect and at least partially compensate for clock drift if it's consistently one way or the other.

    EDIT: Yes, my memory was correct in that the system will calculate your clock drift over time. See this link for the details. Usually the NTP server(s) chosen will automatically set up a polling interval. It will be simplest just to start with the default, and you'll likely find that this is accurate even from day one. You should be able to do some manual updates from the command line in WOSQI or in a "terminal" window on the phone (if you have that). (So cron won't be necessary.)
    Well interestingly enough, I did setup cron to run ntpdate once an hour and redirected the output to a log file. What I found (in the first 24 hours of running it) is that my clock drifts about 10 seconds an hour fast -- this is exactly what I was expecting as my phone would drift forward about 4 minutes a day.

    The really interesting part was that the Pre is not running crond by default. In fact my first attempts to run the crontab command where problematic because the crontab directories did not exist. So, once I created the directories, created my crontab file, started the crontab daemon (which doesn't start with "busybox-cron start" like you would think it would, you just have to start it with "crond") and ran the crontab command with my file as the parameter it ran just fine and now every hour it runs the ntpdate command and logs the results.
  10. crholt's Avatar
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    #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    Well interestingly enough, I did setup cron to run ntpdate once an hour and redirected the output to a log file. What I found (in the first 24 hours of running it) is that my clock drifts about 10 seconds an hour fast -- this is exactly what I was expecting as my phone would drift forward about 4 minutes a day.

    The really interesting part was that the Pre is not running crond by default. In fact my first attempts to run the crontab command where problematic because the crontab directories did not exist. So, once I created the directories, created my crontab file, started the crontab daemon (which doesn't start with "busybox-cron start" like you would think it would, you just have to start it with "crond") and ran the crontab command with my file as the parameter it ran just fine and now every hour it runs the ntpdate command and logs the results.
    Sounds like just what I'm looking for. Would you mind sharing the details of your crontab directories/files? Thanks!
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by crholt View Post
    Sounds like just what I'm looking for. Would you mind sharing the details of your crontab directories/files? Thanks!
    Certainly. It take a little know how with Linux and able to use the vi editor.

    1. Open the Terminal app.
    2. Create the directory /var/spool/cron (mkdir /var/spool/cron).
    3. Create the directory /var/spool/cron/crontabs (mkdir /var/spool/cron/crontabs)
    4. Create new file in root's home directory and open it in the vi editor, you can call it anything, I called mine crontab.root
    5. Place a single line in this file: 35 * * * * /usr/bin/ntpdate -u pool.ntp.org >> /var/home/root/ntp.log 2>&1
    6. Save the file and issue the crontab command: crontab crontab.root
    7. Start the cron daemon by issuing the following command: crond

    That should be it. It will run at 35 minutes past the hour, every hour, and output the results into the ntp.log file in the /var/home/root directory.

    Caveat, everytime you restart your phone you will probably have to issue the crond command again to start the cron daemon, and most likely the next update will wipe all this out and you will have to begin again.
  12. chrispazz's Avatar
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    #32  
    Thank you Mikey47.
    Any help to have it start by itself at boot or to have a link/app for starting it manually after reboot without going into terminal?
  13. #33  
    More info on Cron here if anyone needs it, including how to make cron start automatically:

    Crond - WebOS Internals
  14. deepers's Avatar
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    #34  
    Is this app just for the GSM-based Pres? I ask because CDMA-based devices are supposed to be synced to [essentially] GPS time anyway (they need to use a perfect reference time in order for the whole CDMA network to function correctly). If the time drift mentioned here is also occuring on the CDMA Pres, then am I to assume that the time displayed on these devices isn't actually using the time signal embedded in the CDMA signalling protocol? That would be really strange. Or perhaps this is just a Sprint phenomenon, because when I was on Verizon (with my trusty old StarTac and then my Treo 650) my clock was always perfect, as expected. Sprint and Verizon both use CDMA and therefore require an accurate clock, but I've seen Windows Mobile devices ignore that signal in the past, so I can see how the Pre might be doing so as well.

    I'm just curious if the app author looked into other sources of the reference clock (at least on CDMA devices for Sprint, Bell, etc). That way you wouldn't have to sync over the IP network via NTP, and you could save precious battery strength by just reading the signal that is being transmitted and read by the phone anyway. Of course, you probably don't want to maintain two version of syncing either (one for CDMA, one for GSM).
  15.    #35  
    Well I guess it would make sense that the time seen by Linux may be different from the time contained in the radio's memory. However, tapping into the radio's internal clock would be quite difficult.

    I don't think running this app once or twice a day would create any significant battery drain.
  16.    #36  
    Version 0.2.0 is now in testing. This version uses the Upstart service. From a user standpoint, the only change is a banner notification that indicates success or failure. Also, the device will no longer vibrate if the sync fails.

    Here's a rudimentary road map for NTP Sync:

    0.1.0
    - Initial release

    0.2.0
    - Use Upstart service instead of running natively
    - Success or failure indicated by banner notification
    - Remove vibration feedback on failure

    0.3.0
    - Clicking banner opens card
    - Implement automatic synchronization in background

    0.4.0
    - Allow user to configure interval between syncs
    - Option to have background sync survive reboots

    These are all subject to change, and I'm sure I'll think of more features to throw in at some point.

    I start back to college classes tomorrow, so I hope I'll have enough free time to keep working on this project.

    0.2.0 is not available publicly yet. I hope to get it into WebOS Internals' GIT repository tonight, and push it to the feeds within the next couple of days.
  17.    #37  
    Version 0.2.0 is now in the WebOS Internals testing feed. If you have that feed enabled, you can update now through Preware.

    You can also use this direct link for the IPK.
    Treo 300 > Hitachi G1000 > PPC-6700 > PPC-6800 (Mogul) > PPC-6850 (Touch Pro) > Palm Pre & HTC EVO Optimus V
  18. crholt's Avatar
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    #38  
    This is great, dallashigh! Thanks for your efforts.
  19. sushi's Avatar
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    #39  
    Thanks for this. My Pre is acting up as well.
  20.    #40  
    Version 0.2.0 is now available via the WebOS Internals feed. See the first post for all the details.

    I'm also releasing a public preview of 0.3.0. This version features automatic sync. To activate automatic sync, simply tap the banner notification after launching NTP Sync, then toggle Automatic Sync to "on".



    This will schedule automatic syncs to happen every 8 hours. The app does not have to be open. The timer survives reboots, so you can just set it and forget it. Manually syncing by launching the app will reset the 8-hour timer.

    Please note

    I have tried to maintain a consistent and simple user interface with this app. So I want to make it very clear that this preview version differs in functionality from the default behavior in future versions. In this preview version, a banner notification will be shown after a successful background sync, and your phone will vibrate. This is to help make sure that background syncs are working. When I go live with the final version of 0.3.0, it will only show a banner notification after a manual sync, or a failed background sync. That will be the default behavior going forward, and will be customizable in versions 0.4.0+.

    You can download NTP Sync version 0.2.99-7 (preview of 0.3.0) here.
    Treo 300 > Hitachi G1000 > PPC-6700 > PPC-6800 (Mogul) > PPC-6850 (Touch Pro) > Palm Pre & HTC EVO Optimus V
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