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  1.    #1  
    Last edited by HelloNNNewman; 09/09/2013 at 05:20 PM. Reason: link updated to CrackBerry
    Smartphones: Nokia 5230 > Palm Pre 2 > Nokia 701 (returned) > HP Pre 3 > BB Z10 (save me from it) + HP Touchpad
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  2. #2  
    Every OS has zero-day exploits that only a handful of people know about. The problem with webOS is that even if a security hole is found and publicized, no one will lift a finger to fix it. We don't have the cource code to every component, and those that do (HP), will no longer patch even the most critical vulnerabilities.

    The only consolation is that no one except the NSA would actively search for them, and for-profit entities don't consider a zombie OS a worthy target.
  3. #3  
    Just have a look at how much security issues are fixed in most releases of Chrome/-ium. Then think of how old webOS' WebKit is. There must be countless ways to exploit it…
    Apps (they're all free now): Explorer for Dropbox – a Dropbox app for webOS that actually works (TP+phones), 3-panel-interface
    File Explorer – fast and simple file manager (root support on webOS 3)
    QuickChat for Facebook – real-time Facebook chat (broken)
    Archive Manager – extract and create archives (zip, rar, 7z, …)
    FTPit! – full-featured FTP client for webOS
    e-mail (contact, support) – if you like what I'm doing, feel free to (alternatively in USD)
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  4. #4  
    I dont get whats so bad about the NSA looking at your stuff. Like Father Comstock says A true patriot has nothing to fear from the government. All this paranoia about them de-encrypting your things is stupid.
    Last edited by boovish; 09/08/2013 at 01:46 PM.
    HP Think Beyond event link
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnjwG...dwMIQ&index=31
    If You Have A WindsorNot Hit Me Up
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by pcworld View Post
    Just have a look at how much security issues are fixed in most releases of Chrome/-ium. Then think of how old webOS' WebKit is. There must be countless ways to exploit it
    i think most people are more afraid of the core of their OS being backdoor'd or apps that merrily send heaps of personal data, then there was also the talk of baddies being able to remotely turn on peoples cameras on laptops/phones/tablets without your knowledge.

    its weird in the day and age esp on apple/android where a LOT of people dont bother reading about permissions, what they do, what should be normal who blindly install said apps with bad/dodgey permissions just because their tied into an app they like who then rave about security issues and their rights as if their somehow 2 seperate unrelated things.

    weird.
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  6. namgod's Avatar
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    I dont get whats so bad about the NSA looking at your stuff. Like Father Comstock
    It's not that they're looking that bothers us, it's the changes they make.
    Pilot 1000 w/5000 upgrade > Palm Pilot Pro w/2meg hand soldered ram > M130 > TX > VZPre+ oc1ghz webOS 2.1 +classic +flash +2.2.4 Bluetooth > VZPre 2 oc 1.2ghz webOS 2.2.4 (Super Verizon) > TouchPad 32gb LunaCE w/cyanogen dual boot > Motorola Bionic ( What the hell was I thinking?)the Bionic sucked > VZPre 2 oc 1.2ghz webOS 2.2.4 (Super Verizon) > BlackBerry Q10 > HP VZPre 3 > Galaxy S7 edge
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by namgod View Post
    It's not that they're looking that bothers us, it's the changes they make.
    Why did you only do part of my quote? And, I guess it would be bad if they plant evidence
    HP Think Beyond event link
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnjwG...dwMIQ&index=31
    If You Have A WindsorNot Hit Me Up
  8. #8  
    What's the point when you can easily go to the services that power them?

    Well, maybe texts are just on that device though
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  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by xandros9 View Post
    What's the point when you can easily go to the services that power them?

    Well, maybe texts are just on that device though
    They could just steal your phone and plant a conversation. Maybe thats what happens to your phone when it goes missing
    HP Think Beyond event link
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnjwG...dwMIQ&index=31
    If You Have A WindsorNot Hit Me Up
  10. namgod's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    Why did you only do part of my quote? And, I guess it would be bad if they plant evidence
    Sorry about that. The odd thing is that, that was all the copy in your post at the time... that and many, many line feed/carriage returns followed by a broken or non-accessible url to what I have assumed to be a picture of the Bioshock Infinite Songbird. Now, many hours later, I see the post as you intended.
    (darn Chrome browser on a Win7 box)
    Pilot 1000 w/5000 upgrade > Palm Pilot Pro w/2meg hand soldered ram > M130 > TX > VZPre+ oc1ghz webOS 2.1 +classic +flash +2.2.4 Bluetooth > VZPre 2 oc 1.2ghz webOS 2.2.4 (Super Verizon) > TouchPad 32gb LunaCE w/cyanogen dual boot > Motorola Bionic ( What the hell was I thinking?)the Bionic sucked > VZPre 2 oc 1.2ghz webOS 2.2.4 (Super Verizon) > BlackBerry Q10 > HP VZPre 3 > Galaxy S7 edge
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    I dont get whats so bad about the NSA looking at your stuff. Like Father Comstock says A true patriot has nothing to fear from the government. All this paranoia about them de-encrypting your things is stupid.
    If nothing is wrong with them doing it, why do they have to hide and lie about it?

    They could be open about it without giving away their "operational security". They just had to come out and simply say now the government can and does monitor all modes of electronic communication - and since everyone is a patriot, the people will all throw a giant parade for the NSA for their great accomplishment, and we can go back to life as usual. :-)
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  12. bimmin's Avatar
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    I dont get whats so bad about the NSA looking at your stuff. Like Father Comstock says A true patriot has nothing to fear from the government. All this paranoia about them de-encrypting your things is stupid.
    Privacy. Precedent. Security. The government is going to continue to change and evolve. Every year we move more and more toward a police state. Now that they have these capabilities in place, the gvt of the future can start targeting people based on your digital information (maybe even information from many many years ago). This also helps the worlds most powerful people keep their control and slows change if they know exactly what everyone is thinking and doing. The government having all of these loopholes into the systems we all use means hackers also can use these loopholes. What about the 4th amendment to the constitution? The gvts job should be focused on protecting peoples privacy not dragnetting. You might have a pretty boring digital life but not everyone does
    650p | 755p | Centro | Pre | Pixi | Pre 2 | Pre 3 | 2 Touchpads
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  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by bimmin View Post
    Privacy. Precedent. Security. The government is going to continue to change and evolve. Every year we move more and more toward a police state. Now that they have these capabilities in place, the gvt of the future can start targeting people based on your digital information (maybe even information from many many years ago). This also helps the worlds most powerful people keep their control and slows change if they know exactly what everyone is thinking and doing. The government having all of these loopholes into the systems we all use means hackers also can use these loopholes. What about the 4th amendment to the constitution? The gvts job should be focused on protecting peoples privacy not dragnetting. You might have a pretty boring digital life but not everyone does
    aka: witchhunts based on paranoia (or patriotism, blurry line sometimes)
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  14. #14  
    also to note, the main issue is "spying" on your device, but whos to say things cant be inserted into your device.
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  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter View Post
    also to note, the main issue is "spying" on your device, but whos to say things cant be inserted into your device.
    Yup. The digital version of "plant drugs on the suspect". They know that most people would plead guilty for a shorter sentence rather than fight to exonorate themselves, which takes time and money
  16. #16  
    So they can't tap into webOS... must be why nobody is funding webOS, because that would be considered terrorist funding!
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  17. bimmin's Avatar
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    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToniCipriani View Post
    So they can't tap into webOS... must be why nobody is funding webOS, because that would be considered terrorist funding!
    lol.

    And of course the more popular a platform becomes the more likely they will make sure they can access it. Its best for consumers when there is a lot of competition in a market and not just a small handful of providers.
    650p | 755p | Centro | Pre | Pixi | Pre 2 | Pre 3 | 2 Touchpads
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by namgod View Post
    Sorry about that. The odd thing is that, that was all the copy in your post at the time... that and many, many line feed/carriage returns followed by a broken or non-accessible url to what I have assumed to be a picture of the Bioshock Infinite Songbird. Now, many hours later, I see the post as you intended.
    (darn Chrome browser on a Win7 box)
    Oh
    HP Think Beyond event link
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnjwG...dwMIQ&index=31
    If You Have A WindsorNot Hit Me Up
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by boovish View Post
    I dont get whats so bad about the NSA looking at your stuff.
    Dont worry, you'll grow up and mature one day.
    Like Father Comstock says A true patriot has nothing to fear from the government.
    He was likely referring to a gov't of patriots, by patriots and for patriots; a gov't that respected the rights and privacy of all, that welcomed dissent, valued integrity and did not see selling out as the order of the day.

    If he wasnt, then he was likely another weak, hopeless sap - a Judas goat - falsely preaching Romans 13:1, protecting his tax exempt status and relying on his 30 pieces from said government's faith-based initiatives.

    All this paranoia about them de-encrypting your things is stupid.
    Here's a question: do you give strangers on the street your personal info? Why or why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by xandros9
    What's the point when you can easily go to the services that power them?

    Well, maybe texts are just on that device though
    Texts are archived at the carrier by mandate. The point is direct control and total awareness. The services (Google, Yahoo, Facebook, etc.) are not always direct, can be a bit slow and depend on you signing in, or being tracked through web browsers for example. They act as the middle man.

    Quote Originally Posted by boovish
    They could just steal your phone and plant a conversation. Maybe thats what happens to your phone when it goes missing
    They dont have to; this is not D!ck Tracy or 007. Think 21st Century please. Your voice signature can already be stored and used. I believe it was US Sec of State Colin Powell who, some years back, marveled as he listened to himself in a convo that never took place. If you're up to it, look up the term 'Total Information Awareness' then find out why the Office of Information Awareness was de-funded by the US Congress and what happened to the various programs once the funding stopped.

    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter
    witchhunts based on paranoia (or patriotism, blurry line sometimes)
    Except, the hunters are usually far from patriotic, and the reasons for their hunt or wars are never the ones stated (according to their most decorated general).

    Quote Originally Posted by ToniCipriani
    So they can't tap into webOS...
    we dont know that for sure but as was mentioned, if vulnerabilities exist, they most certainly wont be fixed and thats worse than having a popular OS with holes. You'll be living proof that obscurity does not equate security.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by p41m3r View Post
    [...]
    They dont have to; this is not Dіck Tracy or 007. Think 21st Century please. Your voice signature can already be stored and used. I believe it was US Sec of State Colin Powell who, some years back, marveled as he listened to himself in a convo that never took place. If you're up to it, look up the term 'Total Information Awareness' then find out why the Office of Information Awareness was de-funded by the US Congress and what happened to the various programs once the funding stopped.
    [...]
    Interesting. That sounds like the technology shares some of its underpinnings with Autotune, which also creates a different type of "voice signature", to help with the result sounding more natural and less robotic/vocoder-like.

    Of course, Autotune is a lot simpler, since it takes actual voice input, and never has to deal with various subtleties of speech. But a voice synthesizer is still a voice synthesizer.
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