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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by bassman97 View Post
    One day, the support will start to dry up. I wish my SN95 had the same support. I'm still waiting for a 5.4 swap kit from the aftermarket that also has FE headers for Fox cars.

    But, for your last point, you mean cash for clunkers? Or how attempts to make certain pre-80's cars go through emissions inspection? Might not be one's boss, but all levels of government are trying to find ways to kill the hobby. In NJ, the long lines, coupled with a 5 year inspection sticker is a good incentive to buy new. But then again, bosses do look at you when you have the only pre-OBD-II car in the lot at work and you have marked your spot with a nice trans leak.
    You fail to mention that today's cars are laden with a couple hundred pounds of air bags and extra padding under the carpets. My '89 GT was a little over 2900 pounds and could flat fly (351 4V heads, ported upper & lowers, etc., you know what I'm talking about). When I finished with that one in '93 is when the aftermarket really took off. Real support came in when the SN95 debuted. The same happens with phones because of the never-ending release of newer models. By the time the whizz kids come up with custom ROMs and such, a newer, tastier model comes out. HP/Palm never had this glut of hardware in the marketplace and suffered because of it. There was just nothing to get worked up about since the entire Pre line was one update after the other. 1.4.5 to 2.2.4 was really tweaks. Of course, Leo The Hun put an end to everything so it's spilled milk at this point.
  2. #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by bassman97 View Post
    But, for your last point, you mean cash for clunkers? Or how attempts to make certain pre-80's cars go through emissions inspection? Might not be one's boss, but all levels of government are trying to find ways to kill the hobby. In NJ, the long lines, coupled with a 5 year inspection sticker is a good incentive to buy new. But then again, bosses do look at you when you have the only pre-OBD-II car in the lot at work and you have marked your spot with a nice trans leak.
    That was a veiled reference to my EAS situation at work. I can no longer sync with the server from any Palm device (and HP devices that identify themselves as Palm to the Exchange server). Hence I had to change daily drivers.
  3. #43  
    so sad Matt, figured that's where you were going with that though, I remember you mentioning it a while back. I don't have justification for mobile access (well we all get OWA) and my position doesn't justify additional cost beyond that. But we do bring your own phone now, so no clue if we have killed support for Palm/HP or not. Boss finally switched from his blackberry to a "Droid", I can't remember which one right now, but one with the crazy long signature on the email, that of course he hasn't changed.

    Best part was when he crashed it in a meeting and had to reboot, and the loud "Droid" went off at boot, whole office started busting up, he was mad at the phone lol.
  4. #44  
    WebOS is dead at HP.

    Alive at LG for smart TVs as a minimum.

    OpenWebOS still lives as open source.

    HP was never going to make another WebOS device, so WebOS is in a better place now.
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolVWLover View Post
    so sad Matt, figured that's where you were going with that though, I remember you mentioning it a while back. I don't have justification for mobile access (well we all get OWA) and my position doesn't justify additional cost beyond that. But we do bring your own phone now, so no clue if we have killed support for Palm/HP or not. Boss finally switched from his blackberry to a "Droid", I can't remember which one right now, but one with the crazy long signature on the email, that of course he hasn't changed.

    Best part was when he crashed it in a meeting and had to reboot, and the loud "Droid" went off at boot, whole office started busting up, he was mad at the phone lol.
    Yeah... I can access the OWA site, but it is very unpleasant on the phone. But of course that's not acceptable alternative to access.

    That's hilarious about the bootup sound during the meeting.
  6. #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolVWLover View Post
    [...]
    Boss finally switched from his blackberry to a "Droid", I can't remember which one right now, but one with the crazy long signature on the email, that of course he hasn't changed.

    Best part was when he crashed it in a meeting and had to reboot, and the loud "Droid" went off at boot, whole office started busting up, he was mad at the phone lol.
    iDon't embarrass you in the middle of business meetings, DROID DOES™

  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by fatclue_98 View Post
    You fail to mention that today's cars are laden with a couple hundred pounds of air bags and extra padding under the carpets. My '89 GT was a little over 2900 pounds and could flat fly (351 4V heads, ported upper & lowers, etc., you know what I'm talking about). When I finished with that one in '93 is when the aftermarket really took off. Real support came in when the SN95 debuted. The same happens with phones because of the never-ending release of newer models. By the time the whizz kids come up with custom ROMs and such, a newer, tastier model comes out. HP/Palm never had this glut of hardware in the marketplace and suffered because of it. There was just nothing to get worked up about since the entire Pre line was one update after the other. 1.4.5 to 2.2.4 was really tweaks. Of course, Leo The Hun put an end to everything so it's spilled milk at this point.
    So is any car platform. From 79-04, the Mustang basically was the same. Sure the SN95 platform tweaked things but the best analogy was the switch from the Pre2 to Pre3. Same thing, but longer and a better slider (or in this case, slightly better front suspension and better brakes, along with the length). Then one only has to look at the E series and the Crown Vic to see how successful small updates can be (both had the platform start around 1980). Palm's methodology wasn't flawed (look at Apple with how pathetic their updates are) in this sense. Their doom was spelled out earlier by how comfortable they were with Garnet and their failure to keep up because of this atmosphere until it was too late (where else did RIM get the same strategy) And without the cash to burn, it was just too hard to push out a brand new platform to out do everything. Kind of like how AMC had the Cherokee in the works but it took cash from Chrysler to get it out (and to this day people seek them out as beaters). Problem was, HP was no Chrysler but more like what the Feds did to GM (killed their #3 selling division and canned the SBC replacement engine, with OHC, after all the engineering was done).

    Grabber, just making a point that just like with phones, there are those out there trying to ban everything but the latest models on the roads. For that reason, I had to smile when my 18 year old truck passed emissions at 215k miles and yet my much younger Mustang failed at half the mileage.
  8. #48  
    Yeah, those misguided and shortsighted people make me so angry. I see their reasoning, but they go about it the wrong way. A well cared for older vehicle is perfectly capable of running as clean as a newer one. Cash for clunkers destroyed a lot of perfectly good, clean running vehicles. 😡

    I suppose this is enough off-topic analogy.
  9. #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by Grabber5.0 View Post
    Yeah... I can access the OWA site, but it is very unpleasant on the phone. But of course that's not acceptable alternative to access.
    Yeah I don't even like OWA on a full blown PC, but works when I need to access from home
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolVWLover View Post
    Yeah I don't even like OWA on a full blown PC, but works when I need to access from home
    Can't disagree with that. It is pretty impressive what it can do, but it is definitely a heavyweight.
  11. 3snakes's Avatar
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    #51  
    I received the following text (pasted below) in an email from "Inside Mobile" today. He REALLY has hope for LG and WebOS! I hope it's O.K. to "copy and paste" this.


    "Defining the future of mobile & wireless

    Note: Inside Mobile is written by J. Gerry Purdy, Ph.D., Principal Analyst with MobileTrax and is published on Wednesday each week.



    Trends in mobile & wireless technology



    “Why LG Buying webOS from HP is Important”


    For Wednesday, March 13, 2013

    When Palm developed webOS, it was generally accepted that it was one of the best mobile operating systems ever created even if it was developed too late to help save Palm from the onslaught of Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android.

    HP scooped up webOS in April 2010 for $1.2 billion in what seemed like a smart acquisition at the time: HP could use it as its core device OS and build a wide range of products based on it from printers to handhelds to tablets. But, a little thing like the CEO of HP wanting to divest the company of the PC Division got in the way. webOS was facing a slow death by lack of focus at HP.

    But, a funny thing has happened in the three years since HP acquired webOS: major device vendors are looking for ways to differentiate themselves in the mobile market. Building smartphone products based on Android was at least an initial blessing for major vendors trying to counter the iPhone love fest. The vendor could focus on building new device hardware, incorporating Android (which Google was continually enhancing) and building applications and services on top of Android to provide a differentiated product.

    Lately, however, smartphone device makers want to control the entire user experience from hardware to operating system to software and services to better control their destiny. Google purchased Motorola Mobility in part for that reason which sent a message to other Android partners: Google realized that it’s important to control the hardware as well as the software environment in smartphones and tablets.

    LG has been slowly improving their position in the mobile space over the past few years by focusing in advanced technology in their smartphone line. They have been using Android but, with the possible exception of the Optimus G "superphone", LG still has not been able to have a huge winner in the market against Samsung and HTC.

    I believe that once LG saw that Google acquired Motorola Mobility they realized it was time to find a way to own their entire stack from hardware to mobile OS to software and services. On Feb. 25, LG announced it had acquired webOS from HP thus becoming the third owner of the OS in three years after Palm and HP. LG says its initial focus for webOS will be in connected consumer electronics products like smart TVs. LG says they will continue to support webOS as an open OS, but I think they are going to focus on building products in which they manage the entire stack from hardware to mobile operating system to software and services to give them a differentiated set of products in the market.

    Future LG handsets based on webOS will give LG control over the entire platform and user experience and, thus, be able to play in the market more like Apple. Users today are not going to care about the operating system as much as they care about the total user experience, especially in developed areas of the world such as North America and Europe. That’s in part why Nokia has been able to begin selling lots of units using Windows Phone OS (they have been operating almost like a single company lately on hardware, software and services).

    I expect LG will quickly design smart TVs that are very advanced technically, incorporate webOS and provide an integrated user experience, followed by other devices, presumably handsets and tablets. LG also inherits the Enyo application development framework that has received positive reviews that enable LG and their partners to easily create webOS applications and services.

    Their challenge it to get developers to build apps for webOS, but that is easier than other mobile platforms because webOS is based on standard web development environments. And, they should be able to offer a number of services such as synchronization from folks like CompanionLink, music, news, weather and sports through various partnerships.

    I commend LG for taking this bold step but, more important, I can’t wait to see how they roll out devices, software and services based on webOS. This move certainly isn’t going to hurt their cause. And, it just might launch a big success for them.

    The smartphone market is still growing as it takes more of the worldwide market share against feature phones. There’s easily another one to two billion new smartphones going to be sold each year over the 900 million or so smartphones being built this year. LG could have a much more successful mobile business due to the acquisition of webOS.

    Now, what does this mean for Samsung? They clearly realize that their success is due more to great design and engineering and less to using Android. Samsung tells analysts like me that they are focusing efforts on applications and services to provide a better, more integrated user experience right out of the box. While they could continue to use Android, it wouldn’t surprise me to see them utilize their own mobile OS at some point whether it be bada, Tizen or even BlackBerry.

    As another example, Microsoft is building mobile hardware for the first time with their Surface tablet and with a smartphone based on Windows Phone 8 likely in the near future.

    Thus, we could end up a couple of years from now with each of the major mobile vendors building smartphones and tablets all using their own mobile operating system.


    Written By:

    J. Gerry Purdy, Ph.D.
    Principal Analyst
    Mobile & Wireless
    Last edited by HelloNNNewman; 03/13/2013 at 03:41 PM.
    RumoredNow and jrb363 like this.
  12. #52  
    @3snakes Do you have a link to the original source you are quoting that you can put in your post?
    OldSkoolVWLover likes this.
  13. #53  
    Interesting but this paragraph strikes me funny:

    Their challenge it to get developers to build apps for webOS, but that is easier than other mobile platforms because webOS is based on standard web development environments. And, they should be able to offer a number of services such as synchronization from folks like CompanionLink, music, news, weather and sports through various partnerships.
    Who are these developers? Why are they all of a sudden going to start writing apps when they never did before? Just because webOS is based on standard web development environments, I don't think that necessarily means developers are going to come in droves to write an app or two. Anyone that's talked to DanPLC aka Hedami, will know that he was frustrated by the limitations that webOS itself presents in with what you can accomplish (as a developer) within their apps. (Remember the Karaoke function from Music Player Remix that never made it to the final cut?) Surely anyone out there that's a developer, has either lived through or heard about the trials and tribulations that is webOS. Apps don't appear out of thin air, it takes time and effort to write them. Hopefully LG has something a better up their sleeves than HP's "SWAT" team.

    Honest questions here.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2˘ about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  14. #54  
    Palm didn't have the money to do what needed to be done... if the big name developers aren't coming make it worth their while to come to the platform.

    As I said somewhere else, IF LG is going to succeed with this TV concept, they will have to figure out a way to "run webOS" and have apps functioning like Netfilx, Hulu, HBO Go, ESPN, etc. So for them to succeed, they're gonna have to bring the big name apps or else there is no market for this smart tv. Palm didn't have the weight to do it, and by the time HP got to a point that they could have, Mark Hurd was gone and it was all over.
  15.    #55  
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolVWLover View Post
    Palm didn't have the money to do what needed to be done... if the big name developers aren't coming make it worth their while to come to the platform.

    As I said somewhere else, IF LG is going to succeed with this TV concept, they will have to figure out a way to "run webOS" and have apps functioning like Netfilx, Hulu, HBO Go, ESPN, etc. So for them to succeed, they're gonna have to bring the big name apps or else there is no market for this smart tv. Palm didn't have the weight to do it, and by the time HP got to a point that they could have, Mark Hurd was gone and it was all over.
    ok so webos is somewhat dead :/ so what are phoenix and webos internals doing? i want to see webos ported
  16. #56  
    .
    webOS is DEAD (as a dodo). All this doesn't matter, and is probably wishful thinking.

    ...and before anybody flames, all {my|our|family} portable devices are webOS: Pre 2, Veer, Touchpad (with all the bugs and stuff). webOS: NOTHING ELSE in the building!

    YET.
    .
    .
    Game over!
    WalterZwei likes this.
  17. #57  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    .
    webOS is DEAD (as a dodo). All this doesn't matter, and is probably wishful thinking.

    ...and before anybody flames, all {my|our|family} portable devices are webOS: Pre 2, Veer, Touchpad (with all the bugs and stuff). webOS: NOTHING ELSE in the building!

    YET.
    .
    .
    Really... dead (period)? The only time it would ever be "dead" is if no-one were working on it. It's as dead as Meego or Tizen. It may be done as a mobile device for a time, but as long as there are folks working on Open webOS, there is still life in the OS.
  18. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by HelloNNNewman View Post
    Really... dead (period)? The only time it would ever be "dead" is if no-one were working on it. It's as dead as Meego or Tizen. It may be done as a mobile device for a time, but as long as there are folks working on Open webOS, there is still life in the OS.
    Maybe the thread needs clarification. webOS on devices we have right now are on life support. Not quite the Terry Schiavo variety, but clinging nonetheless. OWOS is just starting out but it will not be ported to existing devices so we're really talking two different systems.
  19. #59  
    Nope,
    it's dead as a chicken with its head cut off.
    Just call me Berd.
  20. #60  
    Was the hang up on apps due to the WebOS team approving them?
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