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-   -   OS market too full for webOS? (http://forums.webosnation.com/webos-discussion-lounge/320958-os-market-too-full-webos.html)

mattmers 01/02/2013 10:44 PM

OS market too full for webOS?
 
So we all have known it has been hard for WP8 to take any bit of ios and android market share, so where does it leave webOS when we have 5 other operating systems entering the market.

ios
android
WP8
BB 10
webOS
FireFox OS
Sailfish OS
and now Ubuntu mobile os

4 of which have to find oems for hardware

dignitary 01/02/2013 11:19 PM

Well, FirefoxOS already has an OEM, so that's only 3. [url=http://www.geek.com/articles/mobile/firefox-os-evolves-from-boot-to-gecko-telecoms-and-oems-pledge-support-2012072/]Firefox OS evolves from Boot to Gecko, telecoms and OEMs pledge support | Geek Pick | Geek.com[/url]

The only question mark left, to me, would be Sailfish and there's a high probability they'll be producing their own phones at the beginning: [url=http://www.muktware.com/4858/jolla-phones-will-soon-be-available-finland-preview-phone-running-sailfish#.UOUT5FS5Mee]Jolla Phones Will Soon Be Available In Finland, Preview Of Phone Running Sailfish | Muktware[/url]

Much of this is already old news, guys. Like, half a year in some cases. Google is your friend.

Ubuntu probably won't have any problems, either, given their openness and opportunity for an OEM to truly offer a desktop and smartphone experience in a single device (and unlike the "Webtop" Motorola offered that was entirely problematic to use). I would expect an OEM or two to come on board by Q3 '13. Furthermore, developing for Ubuntu means an opportunity to cover desktop and mobile in one single application...and with the heavy hitters in development beginning to move to Ubuntu/Linux (it helps that Steam is coming to that platform) you can bet it's going to put up a fight: [url=http://www.ubuntu.com/devices/phone/operators-and-oems]Operator and OEM partners | Ubuntu for phones | Ubuntu[/url]

Ubuntu (and many other Linux distributions) is also the ultimate in open source. Bar none. Linux set the gold standard shaping the modern open source movement, so you just don't get much more open than an actual Linux distribution as your smartphone OS. You'll see Ubuntu for Smartphones loaded on anything and everything webOS can, and plenty more than that. [B]In far less time.[/B]

webOS is the only one of these OSes with zero plans for retail presence and zero revealed strategy to get there at present. Nobody will take it seriously until it does, nor will developers flock to it.

Will some of these eventually die? Probably. It's a crowded field, sure, but one has to assume the chances for webOS are simply not looking very good right now given the well-capitalized options (other than Sailfish) that are coming into the marketplace to take on the big guns with widespread name recognition, long-term user familiarity, a compelling and unique angle, and strong rapport from those that have used other products of theirs.

webOS to the world looks like a nice attempt that had some good ideas "at the time" worthy of incorporating into other, more successful OSes. Why? It failed not only once to gain traction after the Pre/Pre+/Pixi/Pixi+ build quality issues, but also the failure of the Pre 2 on the market (i.e., it went nowhere; failed launch), and then the Pre 3/Veer/Touchpad fiasco not even a year later along with Palm and HP's corporate antics and burning of bridges at every possible corner.

Well, and currently near-zero commercial developer support outside of a half-dozen folks here on this forum. [I]Nobody[/I] (except the folks here) says, "I want to develop for webOS."

Ubuntu alone brings in [B][I]decades[/I][/B] worth of applications of every variety right off the bat and a massive existing user and developer communities, while Firefox OS (with their "WebAPI") allows any website to potentially function as if it's an app on your cellphone. webOS can claim neither of these innovations; these are completely unique to the extent in which Ubuntu and Mozilla are employing them.

For all the people that talked up and drew parallels to Ubuntu when Open webOS was announced, it's ironic that the same OS they held up as a shining example of the sort of underground popularity they wanted for webOS may now completely bite them in the **** because Ubuntu wants to be at the forefront of popularity in the mobile landscape.

In short, webOS can't sit there spinning on its thumb with Open webOS being the exact same thing as legacy webOS only on an improved foundation, relying on the same tired cards and gestures that didn't exactly drive success the first through third times around while everyone else shows off new features that are getting people's serious attention. webOS has to seriously up its game to something much, much more than it is into a mobile OS that brings something brand new to the table again just like it did when it was announced at CES 2009.

The only problem here is Open webOS hasn't shown anything of the sort and, despite the fact that I root for them to get their **** together and publicly demonstrate that they are, I can't say I have much hope that they will. Again.

Mize 01/03/2013 04:02 AM

I'm looking forward to Ubuntu phone for sure. Next to webOS, it's the best looking hmi out there (sailfish's swipes seem contrived).

Rnp 01/03/2013 07:41 AM

Well, when the IPhone was launched, many told that was not space... when the Android was launched, many told that was not space...

In the end: if there is a good work, there is space.

The market is dinamic, and this is one of the good things in Capitalism.


Best Regards... :cool:

hux 01/03/2013 08:42 AM

pretty much to the point, dignitary. webOS would need to have a white knight coming for rescue, but I can't see a bit of that on the horizon actually. biggest problem here is hp does not know what to do with it, and at this status, it's rather falling behind than pushing futurewards.

k4ever 01/03/2013 11:18 AM

I currently have CM10 installed on my TouchPad. Before that it was CM7 and CM9. I also have an Android phone. I would much rather use webOS and do so for 90% of my computing. I haven't met anyone yet who truly likes Android after using it for a while. Even my grown son and teenage daughter are tired of it, as am I. We use it because it is installed on all of the new phones we (I) buy. I have met some pretty satisfied iPhone users. However, most of them don't even know how to use their phone, let alone know what OS it runs. I've had to show people simple things like connecting their phone to WiFi or setting up email. My mother-in-law has had an iPhone 4 since it came out and never even registered for an iTunes/App Store account. I didn't even know that was possible. Is there room for another OS? Yes, there is even room to revise webOS (people like a good comeback story). At this point in time most people don't care what OS their phone runs as long as it looks good (hardware wise), works well, and has the apps and features they need.

[color=#999999]---Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)[/color]

DanPLC 01/03/2013 11:52 AM

[QUOTE=k4ever;3371307]I haven't met anyone yet who truly likes Android after using it for a while.[/QUOTE]

Hi, nice to meet you. :) I truly enjoy using my Android devices (which both run Ice Cream Sandwich).

But back to the topic of this thread, I was just thinking about this question after hearing about the Ubuntu announcement. Personally, I think Open webOS has no chance. It has essentially the same user experience from 3 years ago. I don't see any forward momentum being made in regards to improving the webOS experience. Plus Open webOS has minimal developer support, no published business roadmap, and way too much competition out there in the mobile space.

Frankly I don't see any new mobile platform really making it unless they come out with something really spectacular. Ubuntu and Sailfish had some interesting UI concepts, but both platforms (from the videos I've seen) are not truly awesome and have flaws. Nothing short of truly awesome is going to have any chance of luring developers away from the big 2 (iOS and Android). Windows Phone has the best chance of succeeding from all the other competitors, but I would wager it won't gain the market share of the other 2. Most people I know have no interest in it, if they even know about it.

geekpeter 01/03/2013 12:06 PM

[QUOTE=hux;3371295]pretty much to the point, dignitary. webOS would need to have a white knight coming for rescue, but I can't see a bit of that on the horizon actually. biggest problem here is hp does not know what to do with it, and at this status, it's rather falling behind than pushing futurewards.[/QUOTE]

they have already done something with it, called it gram and kicking it to the curb to fend for its'self, but im still grateful they released it as open source no matter how incompenent ive seen their actions to date.

howemi01 01/03/2013 01:02 PM

Consider the amount of money Microsoft has spent trying to get its foot in the door of the mobile OS game. Other than along the fringes, the landscape is set for at least the near future in the marketplace. webOS, Ubuntu and all the others will only scrabble for percentage points of the total share unless a game-changing factor is introduced.

Mmacholda 01/03/2013 01:19 PM

[QUOTE=Mize;3371259]I'm looking forward to Ubuntu phone for sure. Next to webOS, it's the best looking hmi out there (sailfish's swipes seem contrived).[/QUOTE]

:)
I agree with you. I love Ubuntu and it is my primary OS for my PC. I also use the TouchPad. Next to webOS Ubuntu is the next best thing. Super fast and stable and what a beautiful desktop. Not to mention thousands of free apps and no viruses to worry about.

We should embrace Ubuntu. After all, Ubuntu allowed us to do the first port of webOS

Herrie 01/03/2013 01:21 PM

Open webOS DOES have it's advantages over Android also because it hasn't been adopted yet by any player as far as we know. Developmemt can go quickly (updating to QT5/WebKit 2), open standards, newer kernel. Trying to use as much open source as possible. It DOES offer possibilities but there are still a large number of hurdles to take... If now only manufacturers would release PROPER open source drivers and source code instead of binary blobs we could see a lot more devices getting Open webOS. Currently this seems to be the limiting factor because most manufacturers only release binary blobs which are compatible with Android ICS, JB etc but are still far behind with regards to kernel (3.0 v.s. 3.3+) for Open webOS

[color=#999999]-- Sent from my TouchPad using Communities[/color]

Rnp 01/03/2013 01:28 PM

Give me some webOS devices and I gonna give you an space in market.

Port is funny, but is only for enthusiast user...


Best Regards... :cool:

k4ever 01/03/2013 01:56 PM

[quote]Hi, nice to meet you. :) I truly enjoy using my Android devices (which both run Ice Cream Sandwich).

But back to the topic of this thread, I was just thinking about this question after hearing about the Ubuntu announcement. Personally, I think Open webOS has no chance. It has essentially the same user experience from 3 years ago. I don't see any forward momentum being made in regards to improving the webOS experience. Plus Open webOS has minimal developer support, no published business roadmap, and way too much competition out there in the mobile space.

Frankly I don't see any new mobile platform really making it unless they come out with something really spectacular. Ubuntu and Sailfish had some interesting UI concepts, but both platforms (from the videos I've seen) are not truly awesome and have flaws. Nothing short of truly awesome is going to have any chance of luring developers away from the big 2 (iOS and Android). Windows Phone has the best chance of succeeding from all the other competitors, but I would wager it won't gain the market share of the other 2. Most people I know have no interest in it, if they even know about it.[/quote]

Alright! I have met one. We should do lunch :-)


[color=#999999]---Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)[/color]

sledge007 01/03/2013 06:24 PM

[QUOTE=k4ever;3371307]I currently have CM10 installed on my TouchPad. Before that it was CM7 and CM9. I also have an Android phone. I would much rather use webOS and do so for 90% of my computing. I haven't met anyone yet who truly likes Android after using it for a while. Even my grown son and teenage daughter are tired of it, as am I. We use it because it is installed on all of the new phones we (I) buy. I have met some pretty satisfied iPhone users. However, most of them don't even know how to use their phone, let alone know what OS it runs. I've had to show people simple things like connecting their phone to WiFi or setting up email. My mother-in-law has had an iPhone 4 since it came out and never even registered for an iTunes/App Store account. I didn't even know that was possible. Is there room for another OS? Yes, there is even room to revise webOS (people like a good comeback story). At this point in time most people don't care what OS their phone runs as long as it looks good (hardware wise), works well, and has the apps and features they need.

[color=#999999]---Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)[/color][/QUOTE]

From what I recall in my Pre- days, before I switched to GMail(from Hotmail), there was a certain amount of screwing around I had to do in order to get my email to sync properly. There were several other things that I couldn't figure out for the longest time, and as a result, I found PreCentral.net. There was a lot of patching, a lot of themeing, overclocking to learn, learning how to doctor. There was about a solid month of pocket dials and on and on and on. Blown speakers galore, keys not working properly etc, etc.

I'm sure a lot of people have had similar experiences, and still others that have had a flawless Chuck Norris launch day Pre-. (All I'm getting at here, is every OS, no matter which one, has a learning curve...and to say webOS is easier to learn.....I can assure you my first few months were quite aggravating and I'm surprised I never threw my phone and wrecked it...but I also knew the cost of replacement...so I held my temper :) )

I have also done the CM7/CM9/CM10 routine on my TouchPad, and that was my first real experience with Android, aside from once in awhile I would fix something for my gf's Incredible, but I didn't really play around with it too much. I found Android to be clunky for lack of a better word, on my TouchPad...and in all honesty wasn't very keen on using it there.

Having had my SGS3 since August, it took some time to learn, re-learn, re-program myself in using the OS, but I get along fine on it now. It doesn't have the same flow, but now that I'm more used to it, I can move around pretty quickly....and it's just like anything you try new that's "difficult".....it's easier to learn how to do something if you [I]want[/I] to do it....as opposed to being [I]forced[/I] to do it.

I like using this phone, a lot. A camera that opens up in two seconds and you can take a picture right now. A browser that I've yet to come across a page that hasn't been able to render...(chessboard anyone?). Instant (if you want), or soon as you hit WiFi, syncs all your photos. SwiftKey makes a virtual keyboard a breeze, especially on a phone.Instagram, WordsWithFriends, Push-to-Talk Apps cross-compatible Android/iOS. If I want to look at my pictures on my HDTV, I set up DNLA sharing with my PS3 and away I go. I don't really play games a lot on it, but I am considering buying a HDMI dongle so I can hook it up to my TV, and use one of my PS3 controllers. Netflix is there, meh. Almost forgot to mention the new Music Player Remix....another solid hit from Dan.

Now going back to CM10 on my TouchPad has been quite a bit easier having the SGS3 experience, and doesn't feel as clunky anymore. I used to be in the mindset of "I can get by with what I have" "I don't [I]need[/I] those apps" but it's certainly a lot more entertaining having the options.

As for "Play store is filled with junk and fart apps" "Play store is too big, I can't find anything I like", if you take 1% of the Play store, it equals about the entirety of the webOS App Catalog, and while there's a good percentage of good apps, there's also a good percentage of garbage as well.

So now you've met two :)

-- had a co-worker that never had an iTunes account with his iPhone 4s for the first two months, so that's not uncommon apparently.

Don't get me wrong, I really like webOS, but not only does it have a lot of ground to cover in the catch up game, but in it's current "adrift in an endless ocean", it really doesn't look to promising. Maybe there will be some breakthrough, game-changer and maybe there won't, but I'm not sitting on the sidelines looking in on the game anymore.

Bottom line, if it works for you, and you don't mind the workarounds, then enjoy it! :D

rnld 01/03/2013 07:30 PM

WebOS had it's launch and now is so far behind, barring some miracle, it's done.

MDsmartphone 01/03/2013 09:01 PM

[QUOTE=rnld;3371390]WebOS had it's launch and now is so far behind, barring some miracle, it's done.[/QUOTE]

This is very true.
It shouldn't have happened.
It really shouldn't have.
But bad bad bad management and killer decisions did palm and hp in. And now they are lingering to no point. Looking for somewhere to put open webOS. Finding no takers. This is very sad. As much work as I and this entire community have put into webOS and making our devices special, it's just really sad to see everything gone to dust. There is no enthusiasm for a device or particular version of android because all android users have different devices. Many people with iphone know what they are doing but there are at least as many if not more that have NO CLUE what their phone has the potential to do other than taken pics, text, surf, and download apps. There are too few windows phone users and again diversity of devices to get a unified community. No guys, what we once had here in webOS land.... No matter the frustrations, hardware and software issues, endless defending of the platform and our flawed devices from trolls, home brewing and theming and over clocking, oh my. This was the place to come. Where everyone shared their problems, found their fix. Heck it was like the bar in "cheers" where everyone knew your (user) name.

It was awesome.

Now it's dead.

Shame on palm, HP, and everyone else who let it happen.

:(

Grabber5.0 01/03/2013 09:28 PM

I don't think the market is too full, but I do think there can only be maybe 3, 4 at the very most, successful platforms. I wonder though if any other OS can establish a great degree of success until one of the two big players starts to fade for some reason. I definitely don't think all of these new players will last more than a year or so (not saying none of them will, but they will not all make it that far). It is really disappointing what has happened to Palm. I don't know how many other corporations have done this, but EAS support for all Palm devices is being yanked soon at the one I work for.

k4ever 01/03/2013 09:49 PM

[quote]From what I recall in my Pre- days, before I switched to GMail(from Hotmail), there was a certain amount of screwing around I had to do in order to get my email to sync properly. There were several other things that I couldn't figure out for the longest time, and as a result, I found PreCentral.net. There was a lot of patching, a lot of themeing, overclocking to learn, learning how to doctor. There was about a solid month of pocket dials and on and on and on. Blown speakers galore, keys not working properly etc, etc.

I'm sure a lot of people have had similar experiences, and still others that have had a flawless Chuck Norris launch day Pre-. (All I'm getting at here, is every OS, no matter which one, has a learning curve...and to say webOS is easier to learn.....I can assure you my first few months were quite aggravating and I'm surprised I never threw my phone and wrecked it...but I also knew the cost of replacement...so I held my temper :) )

I have also done the CM7/CM9/CM10 routine on my TouchPad, and that was my first real experience with Android, aside from once in awhile I would fix something for my gf's Incredible, but I didn't really play around with it too much. I found Android to be clunky for lack of a better word, on my TouchPad...and in all honesty wasn't very keen on using it there.

Having had my SGS3 since August, it took some time to learn, re-learn, re-program myself in using the OS, but I get along fine on it now. It doesn't have the same flow, but now that I'm more used to it, I can move around pretty quickly....and it's just like anything you try new that's "difficult".....it's easier to learn how to do something if you [I]want to do it....as opposed to being [I]forced to do it.

I like using this phone, a lot. A camera that opens up in two seconds and you can take a picture right now. A browser that I've yet to come across a page that hasn't been able to render...(chessboard anyone?). Instant (if you want), or soon as you hit WiFi, syncs all your photos. SwiftKey makes a virtual keyboard a breeze, especially on a phone.Instagram, WordsWithFriends, Push-to-Talk Apps cross-compatible Android/iOS. If I want to look at my pictures on my HDTV, I set up DNLA sharing with my PS3 and away I go. I don't really play games a lot on it, but I am considering buying a HDMI dongle so I can hook it up to my TV, and use one of my PS3 controllers. Netflix is there, meh. Almost forgot to mention the new Music Player Remix....another solid hit from Dan.

Now going back to CM10 on my TouchPad has been quite a bit easier having the SGS3 experience, and doesn't feel as clunky anymore. I used to be in the mindset of "I can get by with what I have" "I don't [I]need those apps" but it's certainly a lot more entertaining having the options.

As for "Play store is filled with junk and fart apps" "Play store is too big, I can't find anything I like", if you take 1% of the Play store, it equals about the entirety of the webOS App Catalog, and while there's a good percentage of good apps, there's also a good percentage of garbage as well.

So now you've met two :)

-- had a co-worker that never had an iTunes account with his iPhone 4s for the first two months, so that's not uncommon apparently.

Don't get me wrong, I really like webOS, but not only does it have a lot of ground to cover in the catch up game, but in it's current "adrift in an endless ocean", it really doesn't look to promising. Maybe there will be some breakthrough, game-changer and maybe there won't, but I'm not sitting on the sidelines looking in on the game anymore.

Bottom line, if it works for you, and you don't mind the workarounds, then enjoy it! :D[/quote]



The apps on Android are what makes it worthwhile for me. The interface is too clunky. When I want to browse the internet, read the news (via USA Today or Zite), read a book or a magazine, or even play a game, I turn to webOS on the TouchPad because it is just easier to use and looks better. I was just reading a story about the song "Billie Jean" turning 30 years old on my TouchPad with my daughter. I switched to another story I was following in another browser window while she wasn't looking. She asked me what happened and I swiped back to the original story (I have Luna CE installed). She thought that was cool and started playing with the swipes.

Don't get me wrong. I don't hate Android or iOS. I just think webOS is designed better. I have a bunch of patches installed on webOS that took 1/16th of the time to install than CM7/9/10. Plus I didn't have to buy any of them like some of the things I had to buy to make Android behave better or get some of webOS' functionality (Rotation Lock, SwiftKey, etc).

That being said, I replaced my Pre with an EVO 3D, then a Motorola Photon. I bought my daughter an EVO 3D. I bought my mother-in-law a 7 inch Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 for Christmas. My wife has the last Pre in our house and I just ordered her a Samsung Galaxy S3 to replace it. It will get here tomorrow afternoon, formally ended the saga of webOS phones in my household. My wife says she will hate to see her Pre go but what are we going to do when HP doesn't have the stomach to support it's user base anymore? My family is drenched in Android and I paid for all of these devices along with a ton of apps so please don't label me an Android hater.

Even after all we have been through I still see a future for webOS because the interface is second to none. No one has copied it yet and lots of folks want it to be copied. It has a more natural feel than Android or iOS. BTW, I just watched a review comparing the Nexus 7 to the iPad Mini. The reviewer mentioned that most of the apps for Android still are not optimized for a tablet while the apps for the iPad are making for a better user experience. I mentioned that several times here about Android (CM7/9/10) vs webOS on the TouchPad.

[URL]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSzj_esrPGU[/URL]

Jump to 2:58

Developers don't seem to care about optimizing their apps for the bigger screened Android tablets, even after Google unified the tablet and phone OS. This is making it harder to take Android on the tablet seriously and leaving an opening for webOS if HP could get their heads out of their behinds and support it.

That's on the tablet side. On the phone side, people don't seem to be to wedded to one OS or device. My wife went from a Motorola RAZR to a Palm Pre to a Blackberry back to the Pre and now to the Galaxy S3 without batting an eyelash. My Son has had two different dumb phones, an Android phone, a Blackberry, two more Android phones and now he is using his mom's old Blackberry. Also without batting an eyelash. I had a dozen dumb phones, a Sidekick, a Windows Mobile Phone (with Android .06 installed also), the Pre, an EVO 3D, and a Motorola Photon. I really only miss the Pre because of webOS. My daughter is new to smartphones and has only had an iPhone, followed by two Android phones (EVO 3D is current). I have friends and other family members who have had similar experiences. None seemed to care about the last phone or the OS. I think we could have a dozen phone OSes and users won't care as long as their phone did what they needed it to do. The only folks who would cry foul are developers. HP could easily step back in if they made new webOS phones on sexier up to date hardware. Heck if they made a new sexy webOS phone in red, half of the females in my family (led by my wife) would buy one (or force me to buy one).
[color=#999999]
--Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities (a great webOS app!)[/color]

Remy X 01/03/2013 10:25 PM

[QUOTE=Grabber5.0;3371414]I don't think the market is too full, but I do think there can only be maybe 3, 4 at the very most, successful platforms. I wonder though if any other OS can establish a great degree of success until one of the two big players starts to fade for some reason. I definitely don't think all of these new players will last more than a year or so (not saying none of them will, but they will not all make it that far) [...][/QUOTE]

I tend to agree that there's a limiting factor, but i'd put the number at 5...

I think of all of the current players at this moment in time, only Apple has "natural" market success... Google and Microsoft have poured untold millions into their respective platforms, to get them off the ground...

Android being developed as an antidote to Apple, it didn't and still doesn't have a 100% intuitive/together feel (and to some degree this also applies to ecosystem management), like generic medication vs name brand... or a "store brand" product... also suffering from some fragmentation... All in all, it's like Google, manufacturers and Verizon have banded together to offer an acceptable alternative to the iPhone, after the fact... but neither is terribly in love with the other, they are just together out of necessity... and this is kind of their weak link IMHO, and all other weaknesses of Android arise out of this one...

Apple can and does drop the ball every once in a while, the most "shining" example being Apple Maps :rolleyes: with its melting freeways and "ghost cities". Also, in some ways it no longer tries to out-do the competition, instead relying on "being Apple" as a marketing point. They have a small chance of fading enough to let someone else get a small foothold.

Everyone else is not yet established, so they are quite a bit more susceptible to the market forces, except FirefoxOS, which is almost guaranteed success, as a fresh and welcome alternative to Android.

Windows appeals mostly to enterprise and perhaps to some casual users, with its direct competition being the latest BB offering.


I think the last category, (besides the established "kings" and enterprise) is "hacker favorite", with Debian-based Maemo->Meego->Sailfish and Ubuntu Mobile...

Of all these, webOS falls squarely between the Apple and the "hacker favorite", a somewhat unusual position, good, but also complicating things, "proprietary" but open source, with no real corporate support... maintained by Homebrew but "owned" by HP....



Everyone is digging their heels into the ground, trying to gain even a marginal advantage, while webOS is in freefall, not even trying to compete until there's a modicum of stability. If they write us off completely, and then we come back with a bang, we still get a shot at being in the "hacker favorite" category and luring independent buyers as well as former fans....

Rnp 01/04/2013 05:31 AM

Now, I have 8 Android devices, more than 400 apps...

... and I continue using my Preł as default. Simple & practical.

The SIII and GNote 2 are good to watch movies because the display is good, but the Android... sorry... still missing something (a lot)...

I gonna continue punch in the same key: need devices, need spread in all world... because the webOS is good enough to market. ;)


Best Regards... :cool:


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