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  1.    #1  
    She doesn't give any specifics (obviously) but she makes no bones about the fact that HP has big plans for WebOS and goes so far as to say it could end up being bigger than iOS and Android. No doubt, much of this is merely posturing on her part, but I think it indicates that HP still has plans for the operating system, even saying that HP is going to support WebOS "in a very big way". "You can give us a grade in about a year, and I think the proof will be in the pudding in about two or three." Will be interesting to see if Whitman can distinguish herself from her predecessors and actually deliver on her word.


    HP: webOS Will Be Better Than Android, iOS
  2. #2  
    I couldn't tell if this was from a new interview, I think this may be a 're-story' from the one last week...might be from the same interview Derek discussed on this webOS Nation Story. It is encouraging to hear Meg talking about planning and thinking regarding webOS. I hope to continue to hear her and new webOS team members as things start to happen according to their schedule. I will feel more confident when they actually hit a few more of those milestones on time.
    Sent from my slowly diminishing intellect

    I'm just a soul who's intentions are good...oh Lord, please don't let me be misunderstood!

  3. #3  
    hmmm- hp ceo talking big about webOS.

    where have we heard this before?

    regardless, they may have big plans for webOS- on tablets, home electronics, printers, toasters...etc.

    it doesn't matter to me if it doesn't involve smartphones.

    I am eagerly awaiting someone, anyone to announce yay or nay that future webOS plans include smartphones. All the talk is about open source this, enyo that. Is there any plans to have a webOS smartphone?
  4. #4  
    I know hp has no plans to be in the smartphone business that has been their mantra since the mark Hurd days

    However webos will be open sourced. But for what purpose what will the software be used for?

    For example will there be drivers and software for phones and a phone dialer, such that if by some miracle htc or Samsung or company abcde wants to use webos in their smartphone they can.
  5. #5  
    She seems to have given some thought to the planning process so I am willing to take a "wait and see", especially as Rod Whitby and others, who are being brought into the planning process, continue to make enthusiastic tweets.

    I would not expect to see official phones from HP as Meg and others have said they are not interested in phones. I am not sure what HP "devices" mean and we will have to see what their vision for webOS is--whether it is toasters and printers--or tablets--or consumer entertainment devices--or POS cash registers etc.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by MDsmartphone View Post
    it doesn't matter to me if it doesn't involve smartphones.

    I am eagerly awaiting someone, anyone to announce yay or nay that future webOS plans include smartphones. All the talk is about open source this, enyo that. Is there any plans to have a webOS smartphone?
    I'm with you there. For webOS to have the kind of impact that Meg is talking about aiming for, there have to be smartphones in there somewhere. Smartphones have reached the point where they are almost ubiquitous - it now seems unusual for someone not to have one. If you want to be in the same league as Android and iOS, you have to have a complete product range. As the market matures and tablets become just as ubiquitous most people are not going to be satisfied over the long run with using one OS on their tablets and a different one on their smartphones - they're going to want a consistent experience. Microsoft absolutely understands this, which is why their ultimate goal is to have one OS span phones, tablets and PC's so they can be completely end to end eventually.

    If HP isn't going to do phones again, they are going to have to get another manufacturer to put them out on their behalf, or they simply won't have a chance of fulfilling the vision Meg is talking about.

    I suppose when we hear them announce plans for phones going forward, then we can be confident they really mean what they say. Until then we're still going to have to remain cautiously optimistic and keep swallowing their statements with a grain of salt.
  7. gbp
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by jessicatapley View Post
    I think the phone thing is - in America at least - out of their control. The dumb way they exited the market in 2011 frayed already tender carrier relationships. Now, a lot of the carriers have priorities elsewhere. AT&T is not only the number one iPhone carrier by far, but also the premier (only?) current Windows Phone booster. So a webOS phone on AT&T would be pushed behind WP, iOS, and probably Android as well. Sprint is all about iOS and Android and doesn't even like Windows Phone, so I doubt they're going to push webOS given that they GOTTA sell a lot of iPhones just to break even in 2014. Verizon is pretty much the same way, except they're demanding LTE. T-Mobile is...a joke, frankly.

    I don't blame Meg for skipping it. They're not phone manufacturers, and this isn't their area of expertise.
    +1,
    Me thinks they have plans to use webOS internally for their printers, for their enterprise sort of managing data centers. webOS has an impressive piece of UI. They can use it for their cloud offerings or as a front end tool for Autonomy acquisition. Besides webOS can be their plan B for year 2014 if Windows tablet fails. In summary, HP wants to build it for their current non tablet and non smartphone usage, while using it as Plan B for future tablets. If they get traction on opensource , HTC or Samsung picking it for their phones , it is a bonus. A gamble they can afford to take.
  8. gbp
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    #8  
    Is it me or anyone noticed ,
    Most of the legal section verbiage on the developer framework and tools still uses "Palm" as opposed to "HP". This may be because of the patent thing ?
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by jessicatapley View Post
    I don't blame Meg for skipping it. They're not phone manufacturers, and this isn't their area of expertise.
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    +1,
    If they get traction on opensource , HTC or Samsung picking it for their phones , it is a bonus. A gamble they can afford to take.
    I get your points, but I think the key question I posed remains unanswered - whatever the reason for HP no longer doing phones may be, can we really expect webOS to get any kind of reasonable traction if it's not available on new phones? Are consumers going to be ok with buying one set of apps for their smartphones and others for their tablets - duplicating purchases in some cases, and having to settle for a different app from a different developer in other cases because they can't get the same app on both platforms?
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by icd9icd9 View Post
    Good point. If you assume the most potential webOS tablet users will own a smartphone then it will likely be Android or iOS. That means that there are plenty of apps that are going to run on their phone but not their tablet. I'm not sure how you make that work. It's one thing if you don't use these apps then you aren't like to miss them. It's another thing to use them on your smartphone and to not be able to use them on the tablet - even if there's a tablet version.
    That's where Enyo comes in. Write once, deploy anywhere, sync across everything.
    webOS Ports' UI Architect & luna-sysmgr guru.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by ShiftyAxel View Post
    That's where Enyo comes in. Write once, deploy anywhere, sync across everything.
    No offense, but I've heard that song and dance before and it's never delivered. We heard the same promises 10 years ago regarding developing in Java.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    No offense, but I've heard that song and dance before and it's never delivered. We heard the same promises 10 years ago regarding developing in Java.
    None taken, but did those that promised in the past have iOS proof that it could be done? Just look at FlashCards on Android, iOS and the Chrome web store. Paper Mache is also available on the Droid Market.

    I'll admit it was a bit of a corny post though, I promise I'm not working in the HP marketing department
  13. #13  
    You don't see Java used much on end consumer desktops as a platform.

    But it is well established in the enterprise.

    The deployment problem has to a large degree been handled by moving most core software to a server and the "deploy" via webapps.

    HP made it clear that they don't have any plans for smartphones.

    They always talked primarily about tablets.

    Until somebody announces otherwise we have to assume that any future webos on smartphones will be done by enthusiasts installing open webos on Android devices.

    IMHO it will be *very* difficult to have a successful tablet without smartphones for the same platform in the consumer market. Not only because of apps - but also because it helps to have similar gestures and all sorts of other details handled in the same or similar way.
    It might work better in the enterprise.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by jessicatapley View Post
    I could be wrong, but I don't believe there are generic drivers and software for "phones". I mean, a phone app/dialer, sure. But phones have different radios (e.g. LTE, CDMA, several different GSM bands) for cellular service and they definitely have different CPUs and GPUs all over the place.

    I THINK - key word, think - that would be up to the phone manufacturer, and as always...that's a hope and a prayer. They've been trying to license webOS since July from what I understand.
    Not really. Most phones have more or less same chips. Common ones include Qualcomm Snapdragon/MSM series with an Adreno GPU, TI OMAP series, and Samsung generally uses their own Hummingbird or Exynos (sp?). All of them are based on ARM RISC instruction sets.

    It's not as complex as you think.
    Palm IIIc -> Sony CLIÉ T650C -> Sony TJ-37 -> Palm TX -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre Bell -> Palm Pre Plus Bell/Verizon Hybrid -> HP Veer -> HP Pre 3 NA -> BlackBerry Classic -> BlackBerry Priv

    It's a Late Goodbye, such a Late Goodbye.

    Need OEM Palm Pre parts? See here

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