Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1.    #1  
    As far as I know, the Geo-Restriction is mostly done for two reasons. These reasons being:

    1) Financial laws and taxes differs between many regions.
    2) Localization and region-specific applications won't mix.

    However, I would argue with the following:

    @1) Paypal should solve that; as Paypal is taking care about the financial issues and provide a smooth and clear transaction between the mentioned parties.
    @2) That can be done with a bit-less rigid approach by making an entry for this in Preferences and setting it by default; however, still allowing the user to change it.

    Am I missing something here?

    I am discussing this as I cannot purchase anything and I don't understand why can't I, when I can buy and sell through Paypal with people around the globe with no issues.

    Regards,
  2. #2  
    Geo-restricting applications, especially in the case of webOS is, I think mainly due to the "open" nature of JavaScript/ HTML technologies. Evidently, Palm felt that countries other than the ones selected are evil destroyers and abusers of IP and copyrights etc. Hence the restrictions. It is entirely possible that the countries that are left out have lax laws in this regard, or well known for illegal activity related to software, or have not signed some international treaty.

    That having been said, I think that georestriction of webOS applications was a wrong decision. Here I am sitting in India, willing and wanting to purchase apps, but can't or have to resort to illegal (use a friend's CC) or inconvenient (buy an expensive pre-paid card) means to purchase apps. In any case, the developers are the sufferers.

    Oh... PayPal would have solved at least some of the logistics problems.
    Game over!
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    Geo-restricting applications, especially in the case of webOS is, I think mainly due to the "open" nature of JavaScript/ HTML technologies. Evidently, Palm felt that countries other than the ones selected are evil destroyers and abusers of IP and copyrights etc. Hence the restrictions. It is entirely possible that the countries that are left out have lax laws in this regard, or well known for illegal activity related to software, or have not signed some international treaty.
    Huh we're not talking about North Korea here. Here's the list where paid apps are available. There are a lot of countries missing who do not have lax laws or are known for illegal activities related to software.
  4. Andreas's Avatar
    Posts
    896 Posts
    Global Posts
    938 Global Posts
    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by johnnygewitter View Post
    Huh we're not talking about North Korea here. Here's the list where paid apps are available. There are a lot of countries missing who do not have lax laws or are known for illegal activities related to software.
    Geo-restriction was one of many decisions that killed webOS.
  5. Andreas's Avatar
    Posts
    896 Posts
    Global Posts
    938 Global Posts
    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by johnnygewitter View Post
    Huh we're not talking about North Korea here. Here's the list where paid apps are available. There are a lot of countries missing who do not have lax laws or are known for illegal activities related to software.
    Geo-restriction was one of many decisions that killed webOS.

    Demoed it for many friends and the huge interest vanished directly when the fact the app catalog was locked for foreigners.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenHex View Post
    Geo-restricting applications, especially in the case of webOS is, I think mainly due to the "open" nature of JavaScript/ HTML technologies. Evidently, Palm felt that countries other than the ones selected are evil destroyers and abusers of IP and copyrights etc. Hence the restrictions. It is entirely possible that the countries that are left out have lax laws in this regard, or well known for illegal activity related to software
    Sorry, but this is just nonsense. (imo)
    Apps (they're all free now): Explorer for Dropbox – a Dropbox app for webOS that actually works (TP+phones), 3-panel-interface
    File Explorer – fast and simple file manager (root support on webOS 3)
    QuickChat for Facebook – real-time Facebook chat (broken)
    Archive Manager – extract and create archives (zip, rar, 7z, …)
    FTPit! – full-featured FTP client for webOS
    e-mail (contact, support) – if you like what I'm doing, feel free to (alternatively in USD)
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by pcworld View Post
    Sorry, but this is just nonsense. (imo)
    I tend to agree ...

    They have opened the Free application catalog to practically the whole world with over 200 countries. If they were afraid of the IP infrigmintation, they won't allow ANY access.

    The only logical thing is the financial matters. I do know that handling international payments can be cumbersome, however, I do believe that Paypal can solve that with a much cheaper cost then doing it all in-house.
  8. #8  
    It's sad that Apple and Google can sell apps in my neck of the woods but the webOS catalog is a fail.
    The only thing I got from feedback from HP is basically sad excuses
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News

Posting Permissions