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  1. twack's Avatar
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       #1  
    There is a huge pent up force in the Enterprise right now. Believe it or not, Microsoft holds the key to unlocking or releasing that huge force. What is it, you ask?

    It is the death of "XP".

    When Microsoft launches Windows 8, they will also announce the end of XP support. Large enterprises will be forced to rethink their hardware/software models. Server, Desktop, Laptop and yes, mobile devices will all be in play. The CIO's and IT Directors will be scrambling to find something that will be more like XP than different. Something that will allow them to run their home grown apps as they comfortably migrate to the new platform. Only Microsoft will be able to provide the "top to bottom, ease it in" solution for software. And with Windows running on Server, Desktop, Laptop and Phone it will feel like the safe way to make the change.

    Notice that I didn't say "tablet". Tablets are a different type of hardware. While Enterprise employees think the servers, desktops, laptops and phones belong to the company. A tablet becomes more of a personal device. It's yours. You would think that a company provided cell phone would become personal. But they never really make it all the way into becoming ours because the company is usually footing the cell bill and phones have an interface that is typically not very personal-izable, sans a few ring-tones here or there. A Tablet that is targeted at a migrating enterprise will need to run windows and be personal-izable. While webOS is the latter, it is NOT the former.

    When Leo snubbed his nose at MS during the 2011 Vegas convention by announcing that webOS will be shipping out on desktops, laptops and oh yes, tablets, all Microsoft had to do is remind the HP board that the Elephant in the corner of the room, the death of XP, belongs to Microsoft. So if HP really wanted to play enterprise, they better grab a shovel, and one with a Windows label on it. And we all know how bad HP wants the enterprise business.

    So, if anything kills webOS, it will be XP. And if HP plays the windows card correctly, they will probably be the preferred "top to bottom" hardware provider for the enterprise with Microsoft grabbing the software side. The webOS platform is just not a fit for the hardware or software provider.

    I love webOS. It is a great OS and I hope that the new owners, whomever they are, treat it right.
    TWack
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  2. bs03's Avatar
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    #2  
    How many "large enterprises" are running XP? I don't know any. The demise of XP has been known/expected for a long time now. It has even been delayed. I thought the death of XP would effect individuals, small businesses, and charitable groups more because they don't have IT departments who are on top of this.
  3. DrewT3's Avatar
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    #3  
    I know a few Fortune 500 companies still giving out new computers with XP loaded. Many people also consider the 5 year old Office 2007 to be "the new one" and prefer to use Office 2003.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by bs03 View Post
    How many "large enterprises" are running XP? I don't know any. The demise of XP has been known/expected for a long time now. It has even been delayed. I thought the death of XP would effect individuals, small businesses, and charitable groups more because they don't have IT departments who are on top of this.
    Quote Originally Posted by DrewT3 View Post
    I know a few Fortune 500 companies still giving out new computers with XP loaded. Many people also consider the 5 year old Office 2007 to be "the new one" and prefer to use Office 2003.
    I can't imagine many Fortune 500 companies are already on Win7. It takes at minimum per several trade rags 18-24 months for large companies to adopt a new OS version from MS. The entire suite of apps in use has to be validated and new packaging and security lockdown methods have to be created and vetted.

    How do I know this isn't just industry hype? I'm an IT Architect for a top 10 bank. I have Win7 but the majority of the company does not yet. Win8 is a pipe dream for large enterprise use - the paradigm shift from application centric to data centric will someday perhaps make a dent - but for now application focused users will not willingly make that switch. In fact if anything this might be the interface that drives people from MS to Linux on the desktop side.

    As far as the server side - we have MS products, but the majority and the focus is on Linux.
  5. #5  
    XP has already been killed off once, then resurrected, as for it killign webOS i dont think so, HP is doing a far better job at killing webOS, palm, and neutering themselves in the process.

    Their a company of clever people (mostly sacked now) commanded by fools.
  6. twack's Avatar
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       #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bs03 View Post
    How many "large enterprises" are running XP? I don't know any. The demise of XP has been known/expected for a long time now. It has even been delayed. I thought the death of XP would effect individuals, small businesses, and charitable groups more because they don't have IT departments who are on top of this.
    Well the little enterprise I work at is at least employee number wise, larger than HP (323,000) and MS (90,000) combined. We still buy brand new computers everyday and put XP on them. Until MS kills XP, we probably will continue. IT figures, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".

    And I'll bet that the largest enterprise in the U.S. is still mostly XP. That would be the U.S. Government which includes the HHS, DOD, FAA, DOT, NASA, etc.......

    Could you imagine if Leo went to any of those agencies and said; "Hey Bob, in IT, we're gonna switch you out to webOS next year. How many do you want?", 'ole Bob (using his Lumberg voice) said, "yeah.... Leooooo..... we're gonna have to get back to you on that one."
    Last edited by twack; 11/23/2011 at 01:33 AM.
    TWack
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  7. #7  
    I put the close to release version of Win8 on my vmware.
    It forced me to do several keystrokes more to open docs etc and also switch back and forth to the separate screen which houses the mobile apps--the twitter app etc. Versus mountain lion which took me a few weeks to optimize on my older machine and get it to at least back to par with the earlier version, Win8 seems like it will require a lot of new training and getting used to to do tasks for the average joe shmoe and exec team in the enterprise.The training costs dollars and time wasted on IT when one should be getting their tasks done. Unless there is a case for higher proficiency, I don't see enterprises willingly dropping the dollars on it.
    MSFT has now pegged the XP death for 2014, that gives MSFT a year to optimize win8 ...
  8. #8  
    I've recently started with a company that is large enough to be considered "global" and they run XP on their workstations. There has just been a major upgrade at all workstations and the new hardware (HP "thin client") still loads XP off the server to individual workstations.

    The client servers we connect to run... XP... for our production space.

    This is a data driven business that demands timely updates of information.

    XP was hugely successful with enterprise. It got companies off the bulky NT offering and provided a sleek shell in which to run applications. That and Vista's incompetence are what saved XP from the dust bin when Msft wanted to convince consumers it was outdated.

    Enterprise balked at the idea of XP loosing support from Msft. There will come a time to switch enterprise off XP, but that time is not yet come, IMHO.
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  9. davidtm's Avatar
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    #9  
    Thin clients = Yuck! in my (thankfully brief) experience at work
    No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by davidtm View Post
    Thin clients = Yuck! in my (thankfully brief) experience at work
    LOL

    We aren't allowed to save any data directly to our workstations. EVERYTHING is done through / stored on in-house and client servers.

    It offers a cost effective workstation alternative for outsecurity concerned clients. I will say I'd never have a Thin Client in my household arsenal, but it is a huge improvement over the aging Dell Optiplex systems that were in use previously... IT had to gut so much of the functionality on those machines that it made them error prone and fussy to run.
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  11. twack's Avatar
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       #11  
    For the people who did not believe how big XP still was, read the following:

    Finally! Windows XP no longer most popular desktop system - CNN.com

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