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  • 1 Post By Suntan
  • 3 Post By LizardWiz
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    An interesting take on spinning off parts of HP and discusses webOS. See link.

    take care,

    Jay

    Meg Whitman Should Keep webOS to Make Android Better
    September 23rd, 2011 by Mark Spoonauer, LAPTOP Editor in Chief

    Meg Whitman Should Keep webOS to Make Android Better

    When the first Palm Pre launched way back in 2009—before HP promised it would “double down” on webOS—I asked a product manager why the company was going it alone with a whole new platform instead of opting for Android. The answer: We want to be in control of our own destiny.

    As the new leader of HP, former eBay CEO Meg Whitman is now in control of HP’s destiny, and she has promised to “continue to invest in servers, storage, networking, printing, PCs, and service offerings.” That doesn’t mean that she and the board won’t still decide to spin off the business. I say keep it, and also hold onto what makes webOS great.

    Many argue that spinning off the PC business will allow HP to focus more of its attention on higher-margin software services. That much is true, but the strategy is shortsighted. Think about what PCs are becoming. When Windows 8 arrives next year, the line between tablets and notebooks will start to blur, and the tablet category has a lot of growth ahead of it. HP would benefit from sticking it out and continuing to be a leader in personal computing.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Yes, they want to focus on higher margin software businesses, but without the hardware, this strategy doesn't make sense. WebOS was part of the software strategy, part of the corporate market strategy. WebOS, specifically Synergy, were part of an integrated strategy. There is only so much money to be made migrating people off HP 9000 servers onto Dell hardware. Once you do that, they are going to call on Dell or maybe even IBM, but not HP.

    Consumer Strategy:
    Link phones, touchpads, laptops, desktops with Synergy. Increase the probability of getting a sale of multiple devices after the first one is sold due to the extra bonus of interoperability and ease of setup of personal info. Top it off with printers that are autodetected (zero button) and configured by all the above devices.

    Business Strategy:
    Sell Synergy as a corporate IT strategy. Sell Synergy servers to corporations to hold their employees' Palm Profiles. Expand the profile to allow it to link to backup files. Why? Imagine the scenario where an employee gets a new laptop. They login with their Palm Profile, but it goes to the corporate Synergy server. It instantly downloads all or the relevant portions of the company e-mail and phone directory. Their personal contacts are downloaded as well. Their calendar items are downloaded, all their corporately licensed software and backed up files are downloaded from the company's servers, any WebOS apps are downloaded from HP's servers. Their network settings, e-mail accounts, antivirus, etc are downloaded and configured. All this from one login and password. The same thing happens if they get a new phone, or a new Touchpad. If a machine is having problems, it can be wiped and its OS restored. The employee just logs on again and everything is back. How much IT money would be saved. This is a product companies would gamble on in tight economic times.

    All this banked on having a full line of electronic devices to offer. It doesn't work if you don't have a full line of phones, tablets, latptops, and desktops so the company can replace most of their employees' devices with the new, easy to configure and maintain ones. It only makes sense if a company can use it for their full IT maintenance strategy. If it is only for laptops, and the company had to have a different strategy for phones and tablets, this doesn't make sense.

    Yes Meg Whitman, keep WebOS. Dream a little.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by jordanveer View Post
    Yes, they want to focus on higher margin software businesses, but without the hardware, this strategy doesn't make sense.
    You should call IBM and tell them they have been doing it wrong for the last couple of years...

    -Suntan
    StuckwVerizon likes this.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    You should call IBM and tell them they have been doing it wrong for the last couple of years...

    -Suntan
    Yeah, well IBM wasn't as stupid as HP was about it either. They sold off their PC business to Lenovo prior to focusing almost exclusively on high end servers, enterprise applications, and consulting services. Then they direct their customers to buy Lenovo products as part of the overall solution.

    Declaring to the world that you are going to become a services company, killing off your personal division, and your mobile OS (probably the single asset with the highest growth percentage in the very near future) without shoring up you business and taking care of the infrastructure PRIOR to your public declaration (and ensuing FRENZY) just makes you look like a giant ******...

    They are NOT a service company, they are a giant hardware manufacturer who thinks it is a good idea to go in that direction, which it is, but just by declaring that you are something does not automatically make you that...
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by LizardWiz View Post
    Yeah, well IBM wasn't as stupid as HP was about it either.
    That I agree with. However, the notion that you need to make hardware to sell or even profit off of software services was the comment I was referring to. IBM did it successfully. Transitioning from a hardware manufacturer to a (mostly) services business. HP seems to be trying to copy that notion... and failing.

    -Suntan
  6. #6  
    Yeah, well if HP thinks that they can become solely a software services company without retaining their high end server division then they are dumber than even I thought.

    So you think the master plan is to basically become solely EDS? That is sheer lunacy. There is no value in that plan without the Server portion.

    HP bought EDS, it was not the other way around.
  7. cgk
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    #7  
    Yeah, well if HP thinks that they can become solely a software services company without retaining their high end server division then they are dumber than even I thought.
    My understanding is that that would be kept - when they talk about getting out of hardware, they mean consumer hardware.
  8. #8  
    Well, we are working with Lenovo desktops and notebooks and three years as warranty: first year by Lenovo and other two years by IBM.

    In other words, the IBM is not so away as some people think...

    Buuuut... now, we are changing from Lenovo to Dell, because we have MANY hardware problems since the IBM begun this change...


    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)
  9. #9  
    If they want to convert android to be more like webOS, great. If they want to disect and trickle bits and parts of webOS into android, no... if they did the latter, we'd just end up with another variant of all the annoying android skins like touchwiz, sense, and motoblur.
  10. #10  
    I don't use Sense on my Evo (Deck's AOSP here -- zippier and not a storage hog), but most people seem to really like what HTC has done with Sense.

    Now, TouchWiz and MotoBlur, yuk.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    You should call IBM and tell them they have been doing it wrong for the last couple of years...

    -Suntan
    IBM didn't just drop their hardware to suddenly become a great services company. They developed the services first. They also were leaders in mainframes and servers long before they made this change. The change was gradual. HP was a leading technology company. Carly Fiorina sold off, spun off, or dropped HP's high margin technology areas to become a large computer company. Now they are a large computer company. Then they suddenly want to be a services company because computers are low margin. This doesn't really instill anyone with confidence about their long-term vision or stability.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by jordanveer View Post
    IBM didn't just drop their hardware to suddenly become a great services company. They developed the services first. They also were leaders in mainframes and servers long before they made this change. The change was gradual. HP was a leading technology company. Carly Fiorina sold off, spun off, or dropped HP's high margin technology areas to become a large computer company. Now they are a large computer company. Then they suddenly want to be a services company because computers are low margin. This doesn't really instill anyone with confidence about their long-term vision or stability.
    Again, my comment was in direct response to the sentence I quoted.

    -Suntan

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