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  1. BQ91's Avatar
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       #1  
    Trying is understand the difference between interpreted languages vs compiled languages? Why did WebOS go with an interpreted language, where as IOS, Android, Ms all are compiled languages, in the mobile space. What is the advantage and disadvantages? A friend of mine said WebOS majordownfall is that it is a interpreted languages and thus it will always be slow and buggy, because it is not complied. Did WebOS 3.0 fix any of this> Is this really a big issue for WebOS in the future?

    Thanks for any help in Understanding!
    Sprint client since 1998. Treo 650, Treo 700, Treo 755p, Palm Pre till it died--- now have HTC EVO
  2. #2  
    Does your friend know about webOS version 1.4.5?
  3. BQ91's Avatar
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       #3  
    I have no Idea, today at work I was telling him when the Pre3 comes out I was going back to WebOs, and he said no matter what WEbOS will always be slow an Buggy because is was a interpreted language and not an compiled language. That interpreted computer Language do not work will in an mobile inviroment and thus WebOs will always be flawed. Since I do not really know the difference I was coming here to try and find out. Is it really that flawed? If so why did palm go with an interpreted computer language?

    Thanks for any help I do not really totally understand the difference. I do know my Pre- was really slow all the time.

    Is Webos 1.4.5 changed?
    Sprint client since 1998. Treo 650, Treo 700, Treo 755p, Palm Pre till it died--- now have HTC EVO
  4. #4  
    interpreted strategy is intended to make web apps run on the device. Html is interpreted.
  5. #5  
    1.4.5 introduced the PDK for app developers to develop native coded apps, which I believe is what your friend is referring to as "compiled language".

    As for webOS itself, in version 2 I believe they rewrote the UI in native code to increase responsiveness.
  6. #6  
    yes, the launcher in 2.x is compiled, which is one reason it is buttery smooth...
  7. #7  
    Just In Time compilers exist for JavaScript which helps speed things up quite a bit. The one advantage is that the app doesn't have to be targeted at a particular CPU architecture. That is why the same Mojo/Enyo app can work on an ARM mobile device, the x86 virtual machine used by the SDK, and in the future, HP's Windows desktops. It also why all the wonderful little tweaks in the Preware patches feeds are easy to create, apply, and remove compared to trying to do the same feat with binary executables.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by tj0827 View Post
    I have no Idea, today at work I was telling him when the Pre3 comes out I was going back to WebOs, and he said no matter what WEbOS will always be slow an Buggy because is was a interpreted language and not an compiled language. That interpreted computer Language do not work will in an mobile inviroment and thus WebOs will always be flawed. Since I do not really know the difference I was coming here to try and find out. Is it really that flawed? If so why did palm go with an interpreted computer language?

    Thanks for any help I do not really totally understand the difference. I do know my Pre- was really slow all the time.

    Is Webos 1.4.5 changed?
    This is an oversimplification, but it's an easy description. Think of listening to someone talk in a foreign language, and a third person interpreting for you. Now think of that first person learning to speak your language. That's something of a comparison.

    That said, there's no reason for an interpreted program to be buggy, anymore than a compiled program. As for lagginess, there are some ways to overcome that, but bottom line is that "lag" is very much a relative term. Programs with the right interpreter can be snappy (everything you see through a browser is an interpreted language).

    It's probably worth mentioning that I've been doing all of this long enough that I remember when assembly programmers were saying the same thing about compiled programs that your friend is saying about programs that go through an interpreter.

    In short, your friend is mistaken in several ways.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Orion Antares View Post
    1.4.5 introduced the PDK for app developers to develop native coded apps, which I believe is what your friend is referring to as "compiled language".

    As for webOS itself, in version 2 I believe they rewrote the UI in native code to increase responsiveness.
    PDK can only develop some apps, like games not native apps,
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  10. #10  
    Javascript (webOS), Java (Android), and C# (Windows Phone 7) are all interpreted, but have Just-in-Time (JIT) compilers that generate native machine code. JIT generates native/compiled code for the parts of the program that are used the most often.

    That's only one part of the what makes an OS fast or slow. Android 2.1 and earlier didn't even have a JIT. Having faster hardware and hardware-accelerated graphics definitely helps.

    iOS (especially on older iPhones) also covers up a lot of the slowness with slick animations even if it actually takes the same amount of time to load something.
  11. Vij
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    In short, your friend is mistaken in several ways.
    You're absolutely right.

    People usually equate interpreted with slow and compiled with fast. With modern just-in-time (JIT) compilers, traditionally interpreted languages (java for example) can perform similarly to native compiled code. Sometimes even faster, as a JIT acts dynamically and can do live profiling and re-optimization, which staticly compiled code cannot.

    Buggy has nothing to do with interpreted vs compiled.
  12. #12  
    Your friend doesn't know what he is talking about. Yes, interpreted languages will be slower, but the only situation where it will make a big difference is with games. For example, the webOS Facebook app isn't way slower than the Android Facebook app, is it? And buggy, I call BS on that one. There are tons of buggy apps on any platform, interpreted or compiled.

    Plus, there's the PDK now, so your friend really doesn't know what he's talking about. He just likes spouting off technical jargon because it helps him feel smarter.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  13. BQ91's Avatar
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       #13  
    Thanks for the replies, I have also done some research and agree. I really love WebOS, and plan to come back when the pre3 comes out for Sprint.
    Sprint client since 1998. Treo 650, Treo 700, Treo 755p, Palm Pre till it died--- now have HTC EVO

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