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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    Have you heard about the new "Iphone"? Apple may mean well but they don't have a snowball's chance in hell.

    Apple is way too late to the game. Smart devices have existed for nearly 10 years, and only now are they deciding to play. DOA.

    Windows Mobile, PalmOS and BlackBerry are already well-established and have millions of users.

    WinMo and Palm have hundreds of thousands of apps each, something Apple won't ever be able to catch up. Why do we need another OS if we already have WinMo, Palm and BlackBerry? It's nonsense.

    You can't expect to win customers if you have inferior hardware without even an inkling of 3G and inferior software without copy and paste or even the ability to run an app in the background. It doesn't even have the best camera in the market. Yesterday's hardware and yesterday's software. It might have made an OK XDA two years ago, but now?

    Today, in 2007, the Smartphone wars are over. Surely you don't think a newcomer in this market can overcome the deeply entrenched operating systems that completely dominate it? Especially not with such a weaksauce attempt as this "Iphone". You're just an unrealistic dreamer. Windows Mobile has a market share of 25% - you can't defeat a platform like that anymore. If somebody tells you that things can change, they're lying or dumb. Tomorrow will be like yesterday, always.

    And I heard there's a new XDA coming next month that will make the Iphone even more obsolete. If they don't follow up with more Iphones with more form factors (EPIC FAIL to go without a keyboard - all the popular XDAs and Palms and BlackBerries have one! You can't do something unpopular and expect it to become popular!) on more carriers, NOW and not just "in the coming months", this venture is completely dead. Every day that passes without a competitive Iphone WITH 3G!! and not a last-generation radio will only make Windows Mobile's dominance greater.
    Nice story, but you forget that Apple had 6 years of users of iPods of built in customers. Millions upon millions of customers who would gladly upgrade to get a phone with iPod capabilities (and did). How many tens or hundreds of users does HP have to build upon? (I would have said thousands but reading all the posts on P|C of people jumping ship seems like there may not thousands of current users left...)
  2. #22  
    Lol. Dozens of webOS users left globally XD will you be here all week? I need to tell my friends about you.

    HP has millions and millions and millions and millions of satisfied PC users to build on, not just hipsters who bought the Iphone because they wanted a phone that could play mp3s AND have an Apple on the back, as opposed to existing smartphones that could play mp3s without the coolness-inducing logo and had an Ipod before that because they wanted an mp3 player with an Apple on the back, as opposed to existing mp3 players without the coolness-inducing logo.

    (full disclaimer: I own an Ipod.)
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    Lol. Dozens of webOS users left globally XD will you be here all week? I need to tell my friends about you.

    HP has millions and millions and millions and millions of satisfied PC users to build on,
    Good luck with this
  4. #24  
    The legions of fans of other systems drown out the notes we sing.

    I feel like an Amiga or Atari computer owner now...

    Are we tilting at windmills - very likely yes. Is it worth it? Perhaps. Phone subsidy models in the US make it hard to break the trend because people are locked in for a long time on a particular device. Few users will pay the off contract price for a phone since the price is so high relative to the non-contract price. This makes it hard to sway the marketplace quickly and minimizes the amount of change at any given time.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    Lol. Dozens of webOS users left globally XD will you be here all week? I need to tell my friends about you.

    HP has millions and millions and millions and millions of satisfied PC users to build on...
    Nah, not dozens, I said hundreds ;-).

    And don't forget that of those "millions and millions and millions and millions of satisfied PC users" that millions and millions and millions are running Windows, why wouldn't those users choose Windows Phone 7 over webOS?

    Windows took out OS/2, which was by far a superior operating system, with marketing alone. While I agree webOS is the best mobile operating system, bar none, HP has a LOT of work to do to bring it back from the life support it is on now.
  6. LurkerX's Avatar
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    #26  
    I don't think dearth means what you think it does.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by LurkerX View Post
    I don't think dearth means what you think it does.
    Now that's funny , when I originally read over the OP's post I read in the manner that it was meant by the OP, not the way that word should actually be taken.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by bdhu2001 View Post
    This isn't the 90s and we tend to upgrade our phones every two years. I love the WebOS, but my Pre doesn't do all the things or have the convenience of the apps that I had on my Treo. I'm not willing to hope that they will appear in the next 3, 6, or 9 months. There are some apps on the Pre that made my Pre experience unbelievable. I'm hoping to come back to WebOS, on the phone, in two years when I upgrade again. I also hope that the TouchPad has Quicken so that I'll have an excuse to buy it. I'm staying until the end of June and then I'm making a decision.
    I agree with you on your 90's statement. This technology is moving so quickly that a device on a two year contract is agent by the time you are able to upgrade. One thing I hope HP continues to improve on is enhancements and polish of webOS itself. Due to lack of apps and developers, webOS has the most to offer out of the box, because it has to. Hopefully continued efforts in marketing and advertising can build a stronger development community which creates a stronger OS and more capabilities.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by ariker01 View Post
    I agree with you on your 90's statement. This technology is moving so quickly that a device on a two year contract is agent by the time you are able to upgrade. One thing I hope HP continues to improve on is enhancements and polish of webOS itself. Due to lack of apps and developers, webOS has the most to offer out of the box, because it has to. Hopefully continued efforts in marketing and advertising can build a stronger development community which creates a stronger OS and more capabilities.
    This is why I will be looking for at least a Pre 3 on a month to month arrangement or at most a 1 year contract. I think it best to remain flexible.
    PDA History:

    Palm Zire 71 > Palm T5 > Palm TX > iPhone > iPhone 3GS > HTC EVO 3D > Pre 3

    Touchpad
  10. #30  
    i dont think hp has the userbase or fanbase who think, wow i have a good working notebook, desktop or printer of this company, now they have a smartphone i never heard about, i will get that now. this may be for apple users but not for a company like HP.

    When i see people with a smartphone today (at university, train and so on) in germany i see like 60% iphones, 30% android and like 5% blackberrys. There rest are devices i couldnt recognize.
    Guess how many Pres i saw since i own one from day 1.
    2 Pres, and those were the original...

    Sure im not arround business people that often, maybe it would look a bit different then...

    i would love to see WebOS gets it place in the market, it is a great os, but it has to many bugs and to few apps that uses those nice features.
    I currently doubt hp will fix this, but i would be happy to see me proved wrong.
  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by bdhu2001 View Post
    This isn't the 90s and we tend to upgrade our phones every two years.
    In the '90s, people were still jumping on this whole new "Personal Computer" bandwagon. PCs were not ubiquitous. Many folks were buying them for the first time.

    And when they bought them, they had to make the decision: go with the established "Windows" OS, or this radical, hip machine called a "Mac". (or maybe even OS2!)

    The market had not matured. The only ones championing Apple's OS in the '90s were a small group of devoted, smug and incredibly irritating devotees. It looked bad for Apple.

    I submit the smartphone market is in the same situation as the PC market in the '90s. Because you're posting on this site, you're a knowledgeable person about smartphone tech, you read the tech blogs, and you have opinions on hardware and software.

    But what percentage of cellphone users use smartphones? How many folks using cell-phones are as smart as we are?

    I think HP will be proven right that feature-phone users will want to upgrade. The market is not yet mature.

    So we can have a lot of fun on these and other forae talking about the relative strengths and weaknesses of Droids, iThings, Blackberries vs webOS. But the folks that'll be buying their first smartphone in the next 2-3 years won't know what we're talking about. They'll just go to the phone that makes the most sense.

    This, I think, is what the HP guy (was it Leo?) meant when he said "we didn't buy a phone manufacturer" (or something to that effect). Why would HP want to take on Apple or Blackberry or HTC? Those camps have already been pitched. People like my wife and son who've only used feature-phones are the ones that want webOS. And there are a lot more of those folks than current iThing/iRobot/iBB users.
  12. weedalin's Avatar
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    #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    Nice story, but you forget that Apple had 6 years of users of iPods of built in customers. Millions upon millions of customers who would gladly upgrade to get a phone with iPod capabilities (and did). How many tens or hundreds of users does HP have to build upon? (I would have said thousands but reading all the posts on P|C of people jumping ship seems like there may not thousands of current users left...)
    I'm disliking how everyone's assumed the smartphone game is over simply because companies have already "established" themselves in the market. Yes, several companies have had incredible and, in some cases, even ludicrous successes in this market, but you have to remember that only a very small portion of the potential consumer base actually owns a smartphone. It's still anyone's game, and I think that HP can at least make sure that webOS is still commercially viable.
  13. danransom's Avatar
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    #33  
    over half of the market share in last 2 years have been new to the smart phone market. For example if at the end of 2010 their were 20 million
    users 10 million were new to the market. Smartphones are still in the early stages. The future is where its at and no one keeos a phone that long. The Touchpad and pre3 will have a small impact. But webos market will grow. As long as HP keeps up.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by weedalin View Post
    I'm disliking how everyone's assumed the smartphone game is over simply because companies have already "established" themselves in the market. Yes, several companies have had incredible and, in some cases, even ludicrous successes in this market, but you have to remember that only a very small portion of the potential consumer base actually owns a smartphone. It's still anyone's game, and I think that HP can at least make sure that webOS is still commercially viable.
    You are absolutely right, the game is not over and honestly will never be over. Given what has happened in the past we all know there will be curves ahead which give the "established" the opportunity to run off the road, and the up and coming companies an opportunity to speed ahead.

    It appears all HP is trying to do is play catch up and not playing to pass. The only thing revolutionary that HP is offering is tap to share. In order to take advantage of this you must purchase two devices. Now, if HP were to offer the ability to somehow work with an existing PC/laptop via Bluetooth or NFC or something like that, that may be the surge they need. But expecting consumers to plunk down almost a thousand dollars to take advantage of their tap to share, I think the market will continue to see them as really a niche product.

    Personally, I feel like the "next big thing" will be a combo phone/tablet. Where the tablet is nothing more than a screen, larger battery, and a dock for your phone. So you can have a 4 inch screen on your phone, but when you slide your phone inside the tablet housing you instantly have a 10 inch screen tablet that has additional battery life and (obviously) bigger screen than your phone. Stripping out all the radios, cpu, memory, etc. from the tablet housing would drop the price to around a hundred dollars and people would be much more likely to buy something like that than a five or six hundred dollar tablet to go along with their phone. Just my opinion though...
  15. #35  
    I think I understand something that is happening with Palm. I think that the target demographic for Palm is no longer the target demographic for HP. The advertisements are keyed more towards a business professional than anything else and Palm devices are being promoted as and addition to the HP line of business products. Looks like HP might be trying to take over the business demographic that Blackberry has dominated for so long. If this is true then the new hardware and software from HP/Palm will be centered around this demographic. Which will make for some pretty awesome word processing, cloud, and calendar features I would think. However, it might take a while to get more apps that are created for the standard user. I believe this because if you look at the HP website there is plenty of news about HP receiving different contracts to update business's IT departments. One of these includes a very large contract with NASA. If this is any evidence at all, I believe HP will integrate their smartphones into these companies systems. This will give HP a captive audience to show off the features of the WebOS operating system. Which will in turn lead to a larger mind share and growth by word of mouth.... Just an opinion though.
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