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  1. CMercs's Avatar
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       #1  
    This article appear on Slate and it got me thinking. Is the Destiny of "WebOs on Everything" to be the way all of our home entertainment devices begin talking to each other. (Can't post link yet, but search "Slate Mobile Gadget Prediction")

    Imagine a Tablet, TV, cable box and media center with WebOs on them all, where your Tablet is the remote that can determine the status of all of your devices and command them accordingly.

    To borrow the author's scenario; I click on my Tablet "Watch Avengers Movie" and it talks to my HP WebOs Media Server, Tuner and Television to put all the devices in the right state (finds and plays Avengers movie on my Media Server, Turns my Tuner and Television on sets all the inputs appropriately, etc.).

    What do you think?
  2. #2  
    yep and they all sit there talking to each other while I'm out trying to get grass to grow behind the house and too busy to watch Mrs Peel. But i'll still buy every one of those devices.

    nice find.
  3. brandonp1's Avatar
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    #3  
    I'd like to have my TouchPad tell my webOS enabled toaster to make me some toast...light on the butter, with a little cinnamon...
  4. #4  
    I'd just like to have an updated WebOS on my Verizon Palm Pre Plus without having to hack the phone and possibly wipe out my user account. I'm not sure I've got a lot of trust in HP, fine all these devices work together, what happens when HP decides they are legacy devices and no longer get updates?? I've got a bad attitude about HP right now. WebOS and the Touch Pad are not part of any conversation on the web. If you follow the articles on tablets, the Touch Pad is not even mentioned.

    I think it is a long stretch to TV's, DVR's running WebOS. First they have to release their first big product and try to catch up from lagging months behind in a race that is already started, and they are laps behind. Then they have to convince all the companies that make the devices to adopt WebOS, a tough sell when you have a Palm Pre 2 as your only product on the market. I'll believe the integration is possible but only when I see it. I'm in show me mode now. HP has changed a dedicated Palm user into a show me customer. I have ten months on my Verizon contract. I've got some time to make up my mind. I'll buy an HP phone, with reservations. I'll worry about it being dumped by HP before it's useful life is up. Just like my Pre Plus.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by sandlizard View Post
    I'd just like to have an updated WebOS on my Verizon Palm Pre Plus without having to hack the phone and possibly wipe out my user account. I'm not sure I've got a lot of trust in HP, fine all these devices work together, what happens when HP decides they are legacy devices and no longer get updates?? I've got a bad attitude about HP right now. WebOS and the Touch Pad are not part of any conversation on the web. If you follow the articles on tablets, the Touch Pad is not even mentioned.

    I think it is a long stretch to TV's, DVR's running WebOS. First they have to release their first big product and try to catch up from lagging months behind in a race that is already started, and they are laps behind. Then they have to convince all the companies that make the devices to adopt WebOS, a tough sell when you have a Palm Pre 2 as your only product on the market. I'll believe the integration is possible but only when I see it. I'm in show me mode now. HP has changed a dedicated Palm user into a show me customer. I have ten months on my Verizon contract. I've got some time to make up my mind. I'll buy an HP phone, with reservations. I'll worry about it being dumped by HP before it's useful life is up. Just like my Pre Plus.
    gotta' agree with you sandlizard - now, imagine how we sprint pre- users feel >>>> !
  6. #6  
    I'm all for home automation, but really, any home automation system could be controlled from any operating system as long as the proper software exists. I'm sure that it would be possible to write Crestron software for Windows 95.

    The question isn't whether webOS could handle home automation if anybody wanted to write the appropriate apps for it (yes), but who can afford home automation systems (not me).

    And I doubt that HP is gonna enter the home automation market just because they could... Although I'll say that if a really big company came and released a modular, universal and, most importantly, universally affordable home automation system, that could take off like a rocket given enough publicity. But none of that is really an OS issue, rather an home automation API issue.

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