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  1.    #1  
    Either get Preware into the catelogue or have it installed by default.

    No phone od out there right now actually allows "live" customization of the OS. I have been a patcher since day one and anything that slightly bothered me about webos was easily fixed with patches, it instantly became my dream phone os. And patches have continued to improve the experience above and beyond what HP has done. An that's without themes or homebrew apps even.

    I know preware comes with inherant risks and that it is much more aimed at advance users, I don't see any reason why the app couldn't be hidden by default with the required info in the manual.

    HP has already many times expressed its love of homebrew and webosinternals alray, I don't think this would be a huge leap.

    Am I wrong and this is a terrible idea that should never ever happen?

    And I just want to add that this was all written on the forums app, it really is quite something.
    Proud Canadian owner of
    Palm Pre- WebOS 2.1 Sept 2009
    HP Touchpad WebOS 3.0 July 2011
    Palm Pre3 AT&T October 2011
  2. #2  
    This will never happen.

    Nor should it.

    I understand your premise, but *most* people really shouldn't be messing around with their phones. You do realize that everyone on these forums probably has an IQ that's in the top 90 percentile? We're the elitists. If some dude finds preware on his phone and installs 300+ patches then can't figure out why it works and has no idea where to go to find out, where's he gonna go to fix it? He's gonna either call Palm support or go to the store where he got it. And chances are he's voided his warranty..

    That's probably a little extreme example, and maybe an insult to everyone's intelligence.

    But I still don't think it's a great idea. It's already available and super easy to put on your phone.
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  3. #3  
    Can't. Loading it onto phones by default means HP will have to support it.

    And a lot of the stuff is very experimental, uses private APIs which makes them not admitted into the App Catalog in the first place.

    There's a reason why the kernels all have disclaimers that they'll void warranty.
    Palm IIIc -> Sony CLIÉ T650C -> Sony TJ-37 -> Palm TX -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre Bell -> Palm Pre Plus Bell/Verizon Hybrid -> HP Veer -> HP Pre 3 NA -> BlackBerry Classic -> BlackBerry Priv

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  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by fxspec06 View Post
    This will never happen.

    Nor should it.

    I understand your premise, but *most* people really shouldn't be messing around with their phones. You do realize that everyone on these forums probably has an IQ that's in the top 90 percentile? We're the elitists. If some dude finds preware on his phone and installs 300+ patches then can't figure out why it works and has no idea where to go to find out, where's he gonna go to fix it? He's gonna either call Palm support or go to the store where he got it. And chances are he's voided his warranty..
    I completely agree.
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by fxspec06 View Post
    You do realize that everyone on these forums probably has an IQ that's in the top 90 percentile? We're the elitists.
    Pretentious much?


    Quote Originally Posted by fxspec06 View Post
    That's probably a little extreme example, and maybe an insult to everyone's intelligence.
    You betcha!


    Quote Originally Posted by fxspec06 View Post
    And chances are he's voided his warranty..
    By installing some harmless patches, such as changing the battery icon to a percent or enabling confirmation on email deleting? I don't think so. Only the things that have a chance of breaking your phone will void warranties.

    I think this would be a nice idea, but only if they allow "harmless" patches, two examples of which I described above. If they allow patches that are easily reversed with an uninstall, and make it clear to the monkeys that we apparently think use these phones that patches can be uninstalled if they pose problems, I don't see the problem with it. Obviously, overclocking, tethering, and the like would be off limits.


    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  6. #6  
    Let's split the difference. Encourage homebrew by keeping it as is, BUT... after a patch or program has existed in homebrew for 6 months with no problems, 'graduate' it to the main catalog and pay the homebrew developer a royalty of 10 cents (or more) for each download. for some that would be an easy $10K to $20K, considerably more than they are getting now

    Twice a year, a bunch of programs would move into the main catalog for non-homebrewers and there would be tremendous encouragement for utility development. The rules can be tweaked to encourage whatever type of programs they need. And rather than a straight top 10 or top 50 contest, everyone is rewarded in direct proportion to the usefulness of their program.
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    So at the pitch meeting for enterprise deployment of webOS devices:


    If you're going to only allow harmless patches then who is going to approve them? If HP is going to approve them then why not just make it a system setting or something. Why allow 3rd party modification of the OS on a routine basis? That's not something that the IT department is going to like very much.
    Of course someone has to approve them, that would be true of ANY mobile OS that hopes to get into the enterprise. (The same can be said for Android and Apple) I am an enterprise IT manager and we don't really like much of anything besides the Blackberry. But others are allowed upon review.

    Security depends on the server side controls to be effective anyway, not on client side controls. We assume any mobile device to be potentially compromised and control for that accordingly.

    C
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
  8. #8  
    They already allow 3rd party modification on a routine basis. They even donated a server to webOS Internals to continue encouraging 3rd party modifications. Android, being open source, is open to all kinds of 3rd party modifications, and carriers still sell them like hotcakes.

    Allowing 3rd party modifications is not the issue. The issue is making them more accessible. As C-Note said, of course someone has to approve them, both for carrier approval and IT department approval. You won't allow overclocking, tethering, anything that can be used to bypass security features, etc.

    Why not just make them a system setting? Well, slowly some patches are becoming system settings, like the confirm to delete email patch I mentioned, which is now a configurable option on webOS 2.x. In fact, webOS Internals requires that patches distributed via Preware be licensed under the MIT license to allow Palm to incorporate some patches as system settings. However, these things take time, so if someone makes a useful and secure patch, why wouldn't you allow it until you can make it a system setting?
  9. #9  
    OS patches change the game from a support perspective and make it difficult to have a known good combination. A technically savvy user who is willing to redo their phone if things get screwed up - is willing to take that risk.

    I like homebrew staying out of the main code base. I want great features to migrate into the main code but only after vetting and consensus on what seems to be helpful and supportable.

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