Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    I found this to be a nice read and it is almost 100% upbeat...however, their totals for webOS apps isn't current. They also fail to mention that HP will be having Program Hit squads, going to App creators for no fee and doing the porting of Apps of the webOS format.

    As we all know that porting would be a fast and easy process, however we were all pleasantly surprised to learn that converting Apps as complicated as video games took only 1 afternoon. Most apps aren't nearly as complex and certainly have far less lines of coding.

    This is the beauty of WebOS and why I am sure that HP/Palm will eventually end up with a large chunk of the Smart Phone business.

    I also feel it should be stressed that HP has a great deal of bargaining power to get various HP/Palm models into the hands of large corporate users. After all, it is hard to imagine any firm with a sizable IT division not using at least some of HP's products.....after all, HP makes everything from smartphones to super computers. It's called horse trading and I expect HP will leverage it's other products by cutting very favorable deals on webOS products....

    Take care of yourselves,

    Jay

    PS remember all as soon as the new line of HP/Palm smartphones hit the market place, we will have to be a combination of cheerleader and sales person!


    HP has brought webOS back with a bang, but how does it compare to the other business devices out there?
    By Clare Hopping, 3 Mar 2011 at 18:18

    Does HP’s webOS stand a chance with businesses? | IT PRO
    HP's offering was one of the manufacturer surprises at Mobile Word Congress.

    The company launched its first devices running on the webOS platform after acquiring Palm last year and many were excited to see how it has added its master hardware to a platform that offered a lot but never managed to deliver.

    Prior to being acquired by HP, Palm was suffering. Although its webOS platform was leaps and bounds ahead of Windows Phone and Palm’s proprietary operating system - especially the user interface - there was little place for another smartphone platform. Certainly not against the backdrop of the launches of Apple's iOS and Google's Android. And the fact that Microsoft had realised the threats so was working on Windows Phone 7 and Symbian just couldn't stand up against the competition.

    The Palm Pre was released into a market bored of seeing the product but not being able to touch. After all, a year between announcement of a product and general release isn't best practice for any manufacturer, less so by a company not particularly popular in the UK.

    Add HP to the mix, a manufacturer more used to producing mobile computers in the PDA revolution of yesteryear and things start to get interesting.

    The company has tweaked the webOS platform, keeping its sleek interface but adding some extra value features including speed improvements to both apps and the browser. There’s universal search, just as there is in BlackBerry 6 and iOS, Flash and HTML5. One of the most useful new additions for business users though, is the addition of HP Synergy.

    Although most smartphones have interfaces for unifying accounts, including email, contacts, calendars, LinkedIn and any other account, HP has taken this to a new level with Synergy.

    New tweaks include an API allowing third parties to merge their apps with Synergy and account management and content organisation. There’s even a centralised control panel that means you can change details and add new accounts really quickly.

    Rob Bamforth at Quocirca doesn't think this will make much difference to the brand.

    “HP’s webOS development is going slowly so far and marked with some uncertainty, which is not good for it in the fast moving smartphone and tablet space," he said.

    “HP appears to have sprung into action a little quicker with the realisation of the importance of tablets, but there is still a need to create a 'groundswell' in the ecosystem.

    “So far [HP] has held together the existing user base and Palm fans, but it will need to do much more to move up the rankings - there may be some easier pickings with Nokia struggling, but both Android and Apple are motoring.”

    HP has also worked on the hardware of the new devices. The Palm Pre 3 certainly resembles the Pre, Pre 2 and Pre Plus. That said, it feels more refined.

    The Veer is aimed at a different market, currently filled by the likes of the Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini Pro. It's tiny and designed for those with rather petite digits, making it a rather sub-standard business handset in comparison to the Palm Pre.

    The third product announced was HP's webOS tablet the TouchPad. From the demos at Mobile World Congress, the tablet looks to make waves in the market, but can any of the product line-up compete with the other enterprise favourite, RIM and its PlayBook offering?

    With their QWERTY keyboards, the two companies bring similar products to the table, but Bamforth argues they don't add any value to business users as the BlackBerry does with its full system integration through BES and BESX.

    “HP is lagging behind RIM in terms of acceptance at the IT manager level, and mixed fortunes among users," he said.
    “Senior execs will recognise and favour BlackBerry (or increasingly Apple), while Palm has often been popular among the wider workforce, but they are now adopting Android and perhaps Apple too.”

    Where BlackBerry’s email system is siphoned via the BES or BESX service, HP’s is pushed from the Exchange server, through the enterprise firewall and on to devices. It uses the operator’s network rather than RIM’s data services.

    webOS uses ActiveSync, which isn’t supported in all organisations. It does allow managers to control PINs and passwords or remotely wipe lost/stolen devices, but doesn’t give the same app management flexibility provided by BlackBerry and its massive range of third-party and company supported applications.

    HP’s management tools also allow individuals to remotely wipe devices. Palm Services automatically backs up and encrypts important data and enables the registered user to restore it. Palm Services also enables the HP device user to remotely erase a device without the IT Manager getting involved if the phone is lost or stolen.

    But that’s still not enough, according to some.

    “HP needs to win over users as well as IT managers as there is a danger they will not be a consideration for the increasing numbers of 'BYOD' users (bring your own device),” Bamforth argued.

    “For IT managers it has to offer a system that is easy to manage while allowing users to have both home and work aspects. Ultimately HP needs a strong focussed mobile strategy and to win over ISVs and apps.”

    At present, BlackBerry App World has more than 10,000 applications available, many focused on CRM and business management. HP’s App Catalog passed the 4,000 app milestone back in September 2010, but it's still left somewhat in the shadows.

    However, HP is taking steps in the right direction, explained Bamforth.

    “Palm always had pretty good hardware, HP has a strong reputation for quality and so far the HP hardware also looks pretty solid," he said.

    "But while hardware is an important consideration, software and the whole end-to-end experience is becoming much more important to both end users and IT managers.”

    It's clear, then, that devices based on the webOS platform have the potential to win over IT and business executives. It's just a case of getting the message out there and continuing to respond to their unique needs.

    Because if HP doesn't, there are plenty of other vendors in this space waiting in the wings who will.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    As we all know that porting would be a fast and easy process, however we were all pleasantly surprised to learn that converting Apps as complicated as video games took only 1 afternoon. Most apps aren't nearly as complex and certainly have far less lines of coding.
    Unfortunately it is the reverse. Games are the easiest to port (and only certain games - openGL-based games I believe). Regular apps require much more work. This is why you've seen mostly games ported from iOS.

    It's been about a year since the PDK and the porting strategy does not seem to be succeeding at all.

    Also, what is the "bang" that the post is referring to?
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Unfortunately it is the reverse. Games are the easiest to port (and only certain games - openGL-based games I believe). Regular apps require much more work. This is why you've seen mostly games ported from iOS.

    It's been about a year since the PDK and the porting strategy does not seem to be succeeding at all.

    Also, what is the "bang" that the post is referring to?
    The dropping of the ball? LOL

    Beamed down to the earthlings from my eVo
    Sent from my favorite gadget!
  4. #4  
    LOL, perhaps. Maybe they should have done that on new years eve. Would have come off as a success.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by taharka View Post
    Unfortunately it is the reverse. Games are the easiest to port (and only certain games - openGL-based games I believe). Regular apps require much more work. This is why you've seen mostly games ported from iOS.

    It's been about a year since the PDK and the porting strategy does not seem to be succeeding at all.

    Also, what is the "bang" that the post is referring to?
    Hi all,

    My bad, I assumed the opposite....I should have kept my mouth shut or at least my typing hands shut.....This is why my degree from State Univ of NY is in Horticulture and not in the computer field...

    However, either way, HP/Palm is sending out "hot squads" to do the porting, (HP just announced it was using programing hit squads less than 3 weeks ago, give it a little time)...I haven't heard if there is a fee...I would think HP will do it for free. After another App ported to webOS adds to the customer base in 2 ways.

    1. a customer looking for a specific app before jumping onto the S.S webOS.

    2. The press is fixated on number of apps instead of quality of apps....thank you, I don't need or want apps that imitate bowel functions...however, most articles say there is 135,000 apps for the Iphone, (or what ever number they now have), ...they fail to mention that a great deal of them are such close copies of each other, ((I am making this example up b/c I have no idea exactly what is being offered in the Apple App store....I am repeated what several close friends who have Iphone's tell me), after a while having over 150 movie data base apps, (a made up number for illustrative purposes), it gets over whelming. Not many people are going to download all 150 apps that are almost the same and try each of them....

    Therefore quality f apps should count, it does to all of us, but the press doesn't give a fig about app quality only app quantity....

    The HP hit squads will fan out across America and port as many apps as possible....I can't imagine many firms would say no to having their apps ported to a new format for free and therefore inherit additional customers....

    I just totaled up the app figures from here in the USA, (central Florida to be exact), we now have a total of 7132 apps, in spite of the fact just yesterday I read an article that claimed there were 4,000 apps and we are now not far from double that.

    5994 App Catalog Gallery
    360 Web Dist. App Gallery
    572 Home brew App Gallery
    206 Beta App Gallery!
    7132 total apps in the USA
    Ten months ago, May 16, 2010, the app totals here in the USA were as follows:

    2420 App Catalog Gallery
    428 Web Dist. App Gallery
    474 Home brew App Gallery
    164 Beta App Gallery!
    3486 total apps in the USA

    We have had the app figure double in only 10 months, keep in mind during the 1st 9 months, there were no new PRE models launched, the upgrade to webOS wasn't yet being distributed, Palm almost went belly up and were taken over by a new firm...

    Now that the Pre 2 is up for sale webOS is a reality, webOS has been frankenPred for legacy webOS products, the Pre3 was announced, the touchpad was announced, the Veer was announced, a new and different touchstone was announced, HP/Palm said there would be a number of other products announced during the 1st 9 months of this year including other smart phones, Hp?Palm was coy about webOS on a netbook and possibly on laptops and PC's.

    I think it is amazing considering that Palm had to put itself up for sale....

    I would think that we will see these number shoot up quickly now that HP owns Palm, now that there are App Programing hit squads, now that so many products have been announced with more on the way.



    Take care,

    Jay

    PS I have stated from day one as soon as HP's name came up as the buyer of Palm, that HP would either have a great deal of native apps on the Pad and/or would also port apps for free just to get the numbers up...more apps mean more people converting to webOS!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6. #6  
    I think you're right on with your thinking...HP is not going to let this fail. The "hot squads" is a great idea and should benefit all parties concerned. Can't wait for the Pre 3 landing!
    If "If's" and "But's" were candy and nuts we'd all have a Merry Christmas!


  7. #7  
    3 things...
    1. HP then clarified that the hit squads "SWAT Teams" are more of the "we'll pop in and help those who want help" rather than "we'll do the porting for you".
    2. You probably shouldn't compare app quality between webOS and anything at this point in time. About 30% of the apps for webOS are spam from the top 10 developers. I'm not even talking about whether an app is good vs crap. The 30% spam apps are a single app released hundreds of times because the sport team or book topic or city has changed rather than a single app with a drop down to select a team or whatever.
    3. Adding 4K apps in 10 months would be OK if it didn't represent one of the slower app growth. WP7 (the new kid on the block) added more than double that amount in less than half the time.
  8.    #8  
    [*]Adding 4K apps in 10 months would be OK if it didn't represent one of the slower app growth. WP7 (the new kid on the block) added more than double that amount in less than half the time.[/list][/QUOTE]

    Hi all,

    Yes...however, MS has lots of money and people knew MS was going to be around for a long while...after all with all of their $ they are the proverbial 800 # gorilla...as compared to Palm who during that same period of time had no money and hardly anyone was willing to write for them b/c they felt Palm would close it's doors...

    The creator of DateBk told me months ago that he wasn't going to write for webOS as he was sure that Palm would crash and burn within weeks...he also told me that everyone he knows in the PalmOS community felt the same way...and they weren't going to write for webOS either....he also felt that if Palm was able to sell itself, it world be for pocket change, just for the Palm name & what ever good will the Palm name was worth....3 weeks later HP announces it is buying Palm for $1.2 BILLION..

    1. $1.2 BILLION and he thought it would sell for pocket change...I can't imagine what kind of $ they would find in their couches, if $1.2 BILLION is pocket change...all kidding aside...he insisted that all of the programmers he knew felt the same as he did...they stayed away b/c they felt Palm wouldn't make it...

    2. BTW the same man from DateBK, has since refused to answer my emails if now that HP owns Palm if he would change his mind....I have emailed him 5 times about this since HP announced the sale up until a few weeks ago...I get the same responce....NONE! I guess she doesn't like egg on his face...

    3. My childhood best friend of 46 years, son went to school for Video game software writing...his son Ryan told me that so many in the App writing community felt the same way.....however once HP got involved they decided to take another look at webOS. He also mentioned that it wasn't just the gaming community that felt that way!

    He also told me, like most of us in the Palm loving community, Silicone Valley and all of the app writing community were taken very off guard by HP being a white knight...most of them felt that Palm would limp off to a dark corner and shrivel up and die in a few months....

    4. Now that HP is involved more firms have and will become interested, however there is lag time between HP buying Palm and the software actually being ported to webOS and tested, then released....

    5. As for your first portion of the comment, that is news to me and thank you for correcting me!

    Take care all,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  9. #9  
    Taharka, what went wrong with Webos in your opinion?
    Obviously, it's not just crappy hardware and small screen whats made low interest in Palm's devices. Something on the software side is not working too.
  10. #10  
    IMO, no one thing went wrong. It was a combination of things.
    • Bad timing.
    • Bad marketing.
    • Not enough money.
    • Failure to anticipate the market.
    • Lag! (Having done contracts developing in JavaScript I've seen it bring PC's to a crawl if not optimized carefully.)
    • Delivering an unfinished product.
    • Too much focus on Apple's ecosystem (first itunes then apps) rather than your own.
    • Bad hardware.
    • Too many cards!
    • Forgetting about your core competence (read: PIM).
    • Too many crickets (if no one is talking about your product, then YOU need to talk about it and keep people involved).
    • Where the heck is the Mojo Messaging Service?

    The list goes on...
  11. #11  

Posting Permissions