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  1.    #1  
    It was hard to come up with a descriptive title for this thread, and now it kinda says it all.

    Can anybody explain to me why mobile carriers have any influence at all over when updates are released to the public? As it is, Palm gives the finished update out for testing, then after a couple of weeks they finalize the update and release it for seeding. At this point, 'tis but a matter of months until all carriers decide to push the update out.
    I don't want to know why some would drag their feet like that (politics), I'm asking why they even have their hands in there. I'm assuming that the carrier probably hosts the update images now (Palm may have been too strapped for money), but HP could easily use their own servers for that purpose, and seed new updates to all devices on day 1.

    I'm wondering since O2 Germany were the first ones to release 1.4.5 (IIRC) and have graciously announced that 2.0 will come at an undisclosed date although they will not carry the Pre 2... and that got me thinking about whether a carrier could just outright NOT push an update at all, and why a carrier should have that much power in the first place.
  2. #2  
    They have their hands in there because it's their network. They are not just going to let something on the their network without knowing what it is.

    Think of it like a work environment that you have locked down computers from IT. You want software installed, but it won't work keeps getting blocked, so you have to go to your IT and ask permission to get the software installed, they open up the network and let the software on it, after they understand what the software is.

    Once the carrier identifies how the update works, what it does, and what problems it may bring to the table, they make the decision as to if they will let it live on their network.

    It's Palms update, but it's your Carriers network that it has to be on.
    Ex HP webOS Tech Support

    5Ts: Five ways to get your webOS tablet working again: http://www.hpwebos.com/5Ts

    6Ts: Six ways to get your webOS phone working again: http://www.hpwebos.com/6Ts
  3. #3  
    because the carriers provide primary support, warranty replacements, user billing relationship, etc.

    they also have to make sure it behaves on their network, and they have to document and train call center reps.

    it takes this long for any product update thtrough a phone company. I used to work with a carrier that sold our product with carrier branding. Rolling out updates was a huge effort and took forever.

    google and apple seem to move faster because they have more clout (larger installed base) and therefore they get first priority for these processes.

    you kn.ow how loudly we would all screem if an update screwed up our phones, so they are amazingly conservative about this.

    my laptop just had a 'forced' update from toshiba that bricked the computer and now they are going to take up to 2 weeks to fix it while I just do wihout it.

    I will never buy another toshiba product. I prefer the carrier's careful aproach.
  4. #4  
    Don't complain that much, most of the carriers are now at 1.4.5. We Telcel users in Mexico should be the ones complaining, here we're still locked at 1.4.0!!!
  5. Speebs's Avatar
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    #5  
    In addition to the above, they need the opportunity to cripple features like GPS if they choose.
  6. #6  
    Now I wish more carriers were like T-mo usa. T-mobile couldn't care less that I'm running a Palm Pre Plus on their network. Nor an iPhone, nor a N900, nor a Nexus One.

    Hopefully now that we have a dev phone there will be a unbranded webos2 we can doctor onto our phones.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshipman View Post
    Now I wish more carriers were like T-mo usa. T-mobile couldn't care less that I'm running a Palm Pre Plus on their network. Nor an iPhone, nor a N900, nor a Nexus One.

    Hopefully now that we have a dev phone there will be a unbranded webos2 we can doctor onto our phones.
    They don't test the updates because they don't carry the products. You still have to wait for the original carrier to test the update before you can get it though.
    Arthur Thornton

    Former webOS DevRel Engineer at Palm, HP, and LG
    Former webOS app developer (built Voice Memos, Sparrow, and several homebrew apps and patches)
    Former blogger for webOS Nation and webOS Roundup
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Speebs View Post
    In addition to the above, they need the opportunity to cripple features like GPS if they choose.
    oh snap!! Well played, sir!
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshipman View Post
    Now I wish more carriers were like T-mo usa. T-mobile couldn't care less that I'm running a Palm Pre Plus on their network. Nor an iPhone, nor a N900, nor a Nexus One.

    Hopefully now that we have a dev phone there will be a unbranded webos2 we can doctor onto our phones.
    T-Mobile had an experience recently that proves how important it is to test things. It wasn't a software update, but an app that caused trouble. I guess there was an android app that did something along the lines of incessant pinging for new messages. Evidently it was a popular app, and with thousands of them checking for messages every few secs (or however often it was), the one app having crappy code damn near brought their network to the ground.

    Carriers have to have some level of quality control over what goes on their networks.

    Edit: I know this doesn't relate exactly to being able to use your choice of phone on their network, but the t-mobile mention reminded me of this recent incident, and it seems relevant to the thread.

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