Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1.    #1  
    I have 10+ checks per hour for new information.

    3 from Facebook(20 minutes)
    1 for e-mail(every hour)
    6 from weather icon(every 10 minutes)
    and there's probably other stuff I didn't take into account

    How awesome would it be if it checked..when something changes. I think we'd all be hugely surprised at how such a service would change the battery.
    Quote Originally Posted by rwhitby View Post
    We always prefer that people donate in response to tangible items they can use today, rather than for intangible promises about the future that may or may not be possible to achieve.
  2. #2  
    Hell yes. True Push for 3rd party apps is just awesome. It used to work so beautifully on BlackBerry. Can't wait to see it on WebOS
  3. #3  
    For such a web based OS we lack important push features...
  4. #4  
    The Mojo Push service was one of the features that was praised about when the Pre was first announced, but we haven't heard much about it since.


    If I helped you or you have downloaded one of my files,
    then least you could do is click the "Thanks" button.
  5. #5  
    I'm thinking personally that will come soon with the help of hp, def by 2.0
  6. sbono13's Avatar
    Posts
    426 Posts
    Global Posts
    440 Global Posts
    #6  
    Personally, I'd rather see WebOs just be smarter about synchronizing data calls that are closely scheduled. The OP's 10 checks could be reduced to 6 3G calls per hour if all other checks were conducted during one of the data sessions initiated for WeatherIcon. That way, the overall battery drain wouldn't be much worse than running only WeatherIcon by itself.

    FWIW, I'm opposed to the idea of relying on a cloud-based push notification server, because it only makes sense for bigger apps and really reduces app flexibility. Consider WeatherIcon specifically. At scheduled intervals, WI runs, checks your gps position, then sends a request for the weather for that location. How could a server-side-initiated service even work? WI could run a server that saves user preferences, and then run periodic weather checks for the last known location, send that data to the push server along with a query for gps location. And that wouldn't even save you much in terms of battery life, seeing as how a data call is required to download the data every 10 minutes regardless. You might get a benefit from push architecture if the server only pushed weather info when it's changed, but then the location info could potentially get even more outdated.

    A better example is Twee (a twitter clent). It polls twitter every 15 min or so (user selectable), and presumeably, many of those checks return nothing and are superfluous. Our Pre's batteries would definitely benefit from a server that would poll Twitter for us and alert us to initiate a data call only when there's something to download. The downside is that Twee probably wouldn't exist. Only developers who are willing to run a server 24/7 could make a push Twitter client, and customers would have to be comfortable with the developer saving login info on their local servers. I'd probably do it for an official Twitter app, but not for an unknown developer. The small guy'd get squeezed out.
  7.    #7  
    Exactly, which is why we need MMS.

    I will say for the record I don't use GPS I do it by zip code.
    Quote Originally Posted by rwhitby View Post
    We always prefer that people donate in response to tangible items they can use today, rather than for intangible promises about the future that may or may not be possible to achieve.
  8. sbono13's Avatar
    Posts
    426 Posts
    Global Posts
    440 Global Posts
    #8  
    "I will say for the record I don't use GPS I do it by zip code."

    That would simplify things I suppose on the server side. Still, fundamentally, I feel that the idea of push notifications is a bandaid for platforms that don't allow scheduled client-side background tasks. It's fine for many applications (twitter, IM, etc), but ultimately, it requires workarounds that a true multitasking OS should not require. But yes, I agree with Apple that there are instances where it would save the battery substantially. Personally, I run WeatherIcon once an hour (with GPS) without seeing a substantial battery drain (above my normal use).

Posting Permissions