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  1.    #1  
    ...or risk being shut out of the tablet/mobile market for a year.

    Microsoft’s Lag Time to IPad Leaves HP, Dell Looking (Update1) - BusinessWeek
  2. #2  
    Good read, but I don't think I agree with the conclusion that HP had to buy Palm for a lightweight OS. It would have been much cheaper and easier to produce an Android tablet, as many are already doing. There is a lot of risk and overhead in providing a home grown OS intended for mass consumption, as WebOS users well know.

    Even MS is paying iPhone developers to port apps to their new platform. Palm's efforts to attract iPhone developers is almost embarrassing. These companies are not even trying to get new developers, or native platform developers. They are trying to get iPhone developers to just port existing apps, begging from the crumbs that fall from the iPhone's table. HP would have had a much easier time with Android, as it already has a more robust development platform than WebOS. Just count the apps. HP could have come out of the gate claiming a tablet that runs 60,000 apps. It will be a long time before WebOS has a significant fraction of that number of native apps.

    Android has better name recognition than WebOS. HP could have paid some licensing fee to call it the "Droid Tablet", or some such. There is already a solid user base of Android users who are loyal to the brand and who already know how to use the system. Remember, that is one of Apple's greatest advantages than can't be copied or manufactured with smoke and mirrors. HP could have gone with the solid #2, rather than the unknown also-ran.

    Why every HP chose Palm, it was not because they had no viable option to Windows. Clearly, they did. So there is more to the acquisition than that.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    Good read, but I don't think I agree with the conclusion that HP had to buy Palm for a lightweight OS. It would have been much cheaper and easier to produce an Android tablet, as many are already doing.
    HUGE problem with this

    google is a COMPETITOR, not an ally. you dont want to buy from a competitor what you can own yourself
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  4. #4  
    In what way is Google a competitor? They license an OS for free. Besides a little money changing hands, it is the same business model as MS. Google does not make hardware. Please explain.
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    #5  
    While it's fair to say HP could have probably produced a cheaper tablet with android I believe HP has much larger plans with webOS than just tablets.

    I've read one of HP's press releases stating that they have many devices that will fall into the webOS platform. While I can only think of 3 ( smartphones, tablets, printers) maybe webOS is better suited for adapting to more diverse hardware than android.
  6. Targon's Avatar
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    #6  
    HP is looking at a long-range solution to their idea of connecting EVERYTHING together, from phones to netbooks, to tablets, to printers. With WebOS, you have a native platform that all of these devices can use to sync up. You want to print from a phone, HP will offer that. Or from a camera, or from ANYTHING.

    Right now, there is very basic connectivity between devices, and it seems HP is looking for something that will make it so there is a natural synergy between all HP devices.
  7. #7  
    Again, Android makes more sense for that sort of connectivity since there is already a large user base who would be instantly plugged into devices like printers.

    The premise of the article is that HP HAD to buy Palm. I contend that everything they say they want to do could have been done more efficiently and cheaper with Android. Clearly, HP didn't HAVE to buy Palm. They took a chance and decided to have an in-house OS.

    Every one is looking at Apple's success and thinking its easy. HP even said something to the affect that making smartphones is easy. That is already the kiss of death. Every one forgets that Apple started building an ecosystem back in 2002 with the iPod/iTunes combo, and didn't release a phone until 2006. All the money in the world won't help HP make inroads into this market in one or two years.

    Building an in-house OS and designing hardware around that OS is the hard way and it takes a long time because you are starting from zero. Buying Palm does not help much because HP has to overcome Palm's bad reputation they earned over the past year. Buying Palm was the bold choice, but certainly not the only choice.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    In what way is Google a competitor? They license an OS for free. Besides a little money changing hands, it is the same business model as MS. Google does not make hardware. Please explain.

    Google IS a hardware vendor (or licenser): they came out with their own phone, the G1, right? This spooked the other vendors. I'm sure the android using companies are now worried about a Google tablet. And I'm sure Google is already tinkering with some.

    But even if Google is not a direct competitor (yet), you still want control over the OS and hardware (case in point #1 -Apple). Yes, HP can use Android, and be one of dozens of companies selling generic hardware and a generic OS. That means low margins, competing price, and being vulnerable to delays caused by OS releases (if MS came out with a better mobile platform earlier, you could bet the Slate would already be selling right now).
    KA1
    Visor Deluxe->Visor Prism/Digital Link->Treo 650->Treo 700p->Pre->GSM Unlocked Pre 2 (wifi only)->FrankenPre + Touchpad 32 ->+ Touchpad 4G ATT + ATT Pre3 + 64 White Touchpad... bliss.

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