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  1.    #1  
    Hi all, For the past two weeks, I have expressed the thought, that if need be, HP will pay for Apps to be created. I also have stated that I felt that HP will offer to pay for porting of apps. HP's main goal has to be, to drive the platform by greatly increasing the number of apps. Apparently, I am not the only one who thinks this. Take care, Jay

    Please read below:

    Palm gives HP an edge in smartphones, tablets
    Updated May. 9, 2010 at 8:52 a.m.

    Palm gives HP an edge in smartphones, tablets :: Editor’s Blog at Local Tech Wire

    By KEN HYERS, JOHN SPOONER and EZRA GOTTHEIL

    Editor’s note: Ken Hyers, John Spooner and Ezra Gottheil are analysts with Technology Business Research.

    HAMPTON, N.H. - TBR believes Hewlett-Packard (NYSE: HP) is taking the long-term view with its recent purchase of handset maker Palm (Nasdaq: PALM), with plans for a strong mobile applications business as the fundamental motive. We anticipate that HP’s goal is to use the Palm WebOS, app store and platform development capabilities to turn Palm from a struggling phone maker into a multiplatform vendor of mobile capabilities that range from business e-mail to consumer social networking.

    Thanks to Palm, HP gains a near-term advantage in handset shipments over its chief PC competitors, including Acer, Dell and Lenovo – all of which are moving swiftly into the smartphone space TBR estimates the acquisition will boost HP from approximately 200,000 smartphone unit shipments worth about $80 million in annual revenue to approximately 4 million units and $250 million to $300 million annually.

    However, even if handset units were to double, driving closer to $500 million in annual revenue, HP-Palm would remain well-behind large rivals such as Research in Motion TBR estimates that RIM sold 10.6 million handsets in 1Q10, driving $15 billion in revenue, most of which came from its 41 million subscriber accounts.

    (See LTW deal coverage here.)

    Without a strong application developer community to drive Palm device adoption, software revenue and recurring services revenue, HP will struggle to achieve its goals. Consequently, we anticipate that HP will attempt to drive interest in Palm platforms through the development of WebOS apps. Doing so will position the Palm platform as a tool for businesses and consumers to communicate and collaborate, expanding opportunities for HP.

    TBR believes that developing strong application developer support for the platform will be crucial for HP to achieve its objectives with the Palm acquisition, and will better position the company to compete against Research in Motion’s BlackBerry and Apple’s iPhone.

    Smartphones and tablets

    Palm smartphones help fill an immediate gap for HP, but the tablet PC market was also a key factor in the decision

    Palm’s WebOS positions HP to enter into new market segments. TBR believes HP’s decision to purchase Palm was also driven by a medium-term need to fill gaps in its product portfolio, which HP iPAQ smartphones have been unable to do.

    TBR believes Palm’s WebOS will provide HP with a platform, and potential differentiator, in the nascent tablet computer space. If anything, Apple’s iPad will drive interest in the form factor, aiding HP’s efforts to deliver a WebOS-based tablet that allows users to monitor e-mail, read the news and access electronic books, as well as provides them the ability to create documents, manage photos, and buy and sell goods online.

    Given that no single manufacturer or OS yet dominates the tablet computing space, HP can couple the capabilities offered by WebOS with its own design expertise to become a key player in this emerging market segment. Here too, the acquisition of Palm gives HP the ability to leverage the Palm developer community to create applications and services that make an HP-Palm tablet relevant while fending against the iPad.

    However, TBR expects the HP-Palm tablet to face the same fierce competition as Palm handsets, including from Apple, Microsoft and Google, which is positioning its Chrome operating system as a tablet OS.

    Palm also a short-term defense move for HP

    Palm has received high marks on performance, but its Pre and Pixi handsets have sold poorly in the wake of stiff competition from the iPhone, BlackBerry and a growing number of Android smartphones. TBR believes that, in addition to the potential in tablets, HP’s acquisition of Palm more strongly positions the company against PC competitors.

    With both Dell and Lenovo clearly targeting non-PC devices, including smartphones, smartbooks and tablets, the HP acquisition prevents Palm’s extensive smartphone expertise, IP and WebOS from falling into competitors’ hands.

    The move is also defensive from the perspective of defining the emerging tablet PC operating system space. As with smartphones, two key companies’ approaches are set to define the market. Apple, with its iPad, is emblematic of a closed system approach – where Apple exerts control over all aspects of the iPad experience, from the hardware and software through to the applications available for the device.

    Google, on the other hand, would like to see its Chrome operating system used on tablet PCs much like the Android OS is on smartphones – an open system with open APIs in which third-party developers create various implementations. With WebOS, HP will likely try to stake a middle ground, offering a more robust enterprise-class OS for which customers will have an easy time developing applications.

    HP hopes to avoid creating a completely closed system and/or the potential free-for-all that Google’s approach promises. By following this middle path, it aims to create an enterprise-class mobile computing platform that encompasses both the ease-of-use and ease-to-develop that Palm’s software offers.

    HP threatens Microsoft’s tablet PC efforts

    HP’s purchase of Palm is primarily a software play, giving it a mobile OS superior to the Windows Mobile OS it currently uses, and providing it with a tablet PC OS that will likely be superior to Windows. HP’s current tablet with Microsoft Windows has not been well received by reviewers, and TBR believes the Windows PC operating system does not lend itself to a touchscreen tablet experience.

    Microsoft itself is finding the tablet PC market more complicated than expected, and recently ended development efforts on its own tablet, codenamed Courier.

    Nevertheless, the decision to acquire Palm does not mean that HP is moving away from Windows across its mobile products. HP is a champion of customer choice and includes multiple processors and multiple operating systems in its lineup, such as Intel/AMD and Windows/Linux. TBR believes WebOS will become yet another choice in HP’s portfolio. From a usability standpoint, however, we believe a WebOS tablet will be better received than a Windows tablet, which may lead to adoption of WebOS tablet PCs in the enterprise.

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  2. #2  
    Good read, but the "tablet" market is very finicky. There really isn't a market right now, as the only successful tablet device is the iPad and it really only does the lightest of computing possible.

    If HP wants to really show off, and I mean really show off, ship a WebOS tablet with a full office client, handwriting/note taking software, and a full fledged file system. Bonus points for allowing printing to work.

    If all that ships in the box, I will buy one, as now I have an ultra-mobile computer with quick access to the internet that I can use effectively in school/job. That, might actually replace my laptop.

    If Flash comes to WebOS too, then it will be a dream machine.

    Oh, and put in a kick stand and let those old fold-up bluetooth keyboards come back into the fold too. Yea, I am starting to drool now.
    Master Pants, Lord of the Universe, Groupie of Blaize

    Need help with your webOS device? PM me for help!
  3. cfbauer's Avatar
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    #3  
    Kind of bad to just copy the entire article. Just post the link and let people view the article from the creator.

    <<edited by mod>>
    Last edited by berdinkerdickle; 05/09/2010 at 04:49 PM.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by cfbauer View Post
    Kind of bad to just copy the entire article. Just post the link and let people view the article from the creator.

    <<edited by mod>>
    Though I agree a link needs to be included I personally would rather the article be copied than have to go to another website. I don't click on links if I don't know the person.
    Last edited by berdinkerdickle; 05/09/2010 at 04:50 PM.
  5. #5  
    Imagine if they do an hot apps thing every month,in one of these formats


    every week: 50 $1000 prices = $50,000x4 = 200, 000.
    every week: 10 $10,000 prices = $100,000x4= 400, 000.
    every month: 8 $25,000 prices = $200,000x1= 200, 000.
    every month: 2 $100,000 prices = $200,000x1= 200, 000.

    or

    every week: 100 $1000 prices = $100,000x4 =400, 000.
    every week: 10 $10,000 prices = $100,000x4= 400, 000.
    every month: 2 $100,000 prices = $200,000x2= 200 000.

    or
    every week: 100 $1000 prices = $100,000x4 =400, 000.
    every week: 10 $7,500 prices = $75,000x4= 300, 000.
    every month: 4 $25,000 prices = $100,000x1= 100, 000.
    every month: 2 $100,000 prices = $200,000x2= 200 000.



    Maybe more cash for free apps.. Either way, you are going to see at-least 500 new apps every week. Releasing near the end of the month would reduce your chances of getting the $25, 000, and the $100, 000, but since the makers of major apps like shazam would wait and release in the beginning of the month, it would increase your chances of winning a $10,000 price.


    Hp spend 1.2 billion on palm, and apps are a major part of weather the platform makes it or not, so hp might decide to spend 50 million the first year on apps. That would = 4 million a month.

    They could give out 20x 1000 dollars every day, which would = 20, 000 a day, which would = 600, 000 a month.

    then give out 40x 10, 000 a week, which would = 1.6 million a month. bringing the total to 2.2 million.

    then have 32 25,000 prices a month, which = .8 million. bringing the total to 3 million.

    have 10 100,000 prices each month = 1 million, bringing the total to 4 million.
  6. #6  
    Jay (ilovedessert) has been here for a long time and makes good posts; I trust his links. Also he does include a link to the original at the top. This is just his method of posting.
    Master Pants, Lord of the Universe, Groupie of Blaize

    Need help with your webOS device? PM me for help!
  7. #7  
    As far as more apps are concerned, HP needs to get Data Viz or some other company to make a solid office suit for WebOS. Since a tablet is coming out, I would suggest making a very high end version for the tablet and a more on the go one for the smart phones.

    Also, hopefully HP will push the PDK further along.
    Master Pants, Lord of the Universe, Groupie of Blaize

    Need help with your webOS device? PM me for help!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Complex Pants View Post
    As far as more apps are concerned, HP needs to get Data Viz or some other company to make a solid office suit for WebOS. Since a tablet is coming out, I would suggest making a very high end version for the tablet and a more on the go one for the smart phones.

    Also, hopefully HP will push the PDK further along.

    If hp spends 4 million a month for a year, or even 6 months, with 32 $25,000 prices every month someone will step up and a great office suit for web-os.. It might even be free!

    They should make 2/3 or 3/4 of the prices for free apps to make it known as a platform with alot of free apps.
  9. #9  
    They should just make a $100,000 prize for best office suit, as voted by users. Give 3-6 months from the time of open PDK app submission, and at the end of the time period, user vote and #1 gets the $100k, #2 gets $50k and #3rd $25k.

    Nothing wrong with some spirited direction of development
    Master Pants, Lord of the Universe, Groupie of Blaize

    Need help with your webOS device? PM me for help!
  10. VKitty's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by thekarens View Post
    Though I agree a link needs to be included I personally would rather the article be copied than have to go to another website. I don't click on links if I don't know the person.

    I agree with not clicking on links if you dont know the person.. So having the article copied is a good call.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Complex Pants View Post
    They should just make a $100,000 prize for best office suit, as voted by users. Give 3-6 months from the time of open PDK app submission, and at the end of the time period, user vote and #1 gets the $100k, #2 gets $50k and #3rd $25k.

    Nothing wrong with some spirited direction of development
    how bout they make it for the best free office suit?
  12. #12  
    because the company that develops a good suite would make more over time through sales than a lump sum payment for winning a contest.
    Quote Originally Posted by nimer55 View Post
    how bout they make it for the best free office suit?
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
  13. #13  
    I think HP is going to promote the whole webOS environment extremely hard. I believe they want to have what Apple has with its various stores(apps,music,books). This type of ecosystem will attract consumers. It's up to HP to heavily invest to jump start the development of this ecosystem to catch up with apple and google. If it can differentiate itself as the prosumer/business user's device, I think they can be quite successful.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by nychump View Post
    I think HP is going to promote the whole webOS environment extremely hard. I believe they want to have what Apple has with its various stores(apps,music,books). This type of ecosystem will attract consumers. It's up to HP to heavily invest to jump start the development of this ecosystem to catch up with apple and google. If it can differentiate itself as the prosumer/business user's device, I think they can be quite successful.
    Agreed, 100%. And, with their recent co-branding with Barnes & Nobles, they've created an instant competitor to Apple's iBooks. Check it out:

    eBook Store: Download Free eBooks, eReader - Barnes & Noble and HP

    As a B&N nook owner, I was incredibly excited to see this. And I don't think the timing is at all coincidental--perhaps they planned this already for the Slate (which may or may not still happen), but it would certainly support a webOS tablet just as well.

    Simply put, HP has the money and distribution channels to take webOS development to a level we've only dreamed out. I'm not saying we'll have 200K apps in a year, but I wouldn't be surprised it we've caught up with Android by this time next year.
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic

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