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  1.    #1  
    Found this article through Google news and thought I would post it here.

    http://www.ofb.biz/safari/article/623.html



    The author should of done a better job in researching as throughout the whole article he refers to webOS as WebOS.
    Last edited by ev99wutang; 03/07/2010 at 09:10 PM.
  2. #2  
    They called the button on the Pre a trackball. I wouldn't pay any heed to that article.
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudementry View Post
    They called the button on the Pre a trackball. I wouldn't pay any heed to that article.
    I missed that one, just sad. Upsets me to see uninformed people talking about Palm and webOS.
  4. #4  
    I love it when I see PalmOS instead of webOS.
  5. #5  
    The trackball reference was a editorial mistake that was suppose to be corrected before publication. As to "WebOS," that is a matter of our style guide -- we do not follow certain non-standard capitalization when describing products. For example, "DROID" is styled "Droid" on OFB and likewise "palm pre" is styled "Palm Pre." Every publication has to decide to what extent non-standard capitalization is carried over into editorial content.

    As to other details in the article, we believe them to be factually true based on our multi-week testing of the Palm Pre Plus and Palm Pixi Plus.

    Best,
    Tim
  6. #6  
    Tim,

    why say that you are simply following your style guide, and that's why the "w" in webOS was capitalized, when, in the same article you use a lowercase "i" in front of every Phone (iPhone)...?

    what phone do you own Tim?
  7. miata's Avatar
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    #7  
    Not a bad review. I'm just a little surprised that they would recommend the Droid or Eris over the WebOS phones on Verizon. The iPhone is not for me, but I can understand it being recommended to the masses. I do have to wonder if the comparison was with a Pre 1.4 version of WebOS though...
  8. #8  
    Dingwall1, that's an interesting issue you raise. Traditionally, we have maintained the lowercase "i" in front of devices that use it ("iPad", "iPod", "iPhone", "iMac") and a few other odd capitalizations ("SuSE" back in the day), but not the vast majority of others, and certainly all which utilize lower case stylistically to whole words that would normally be capitalized. In any case, it was a very conscious decision with regards to webOS, not a matter of accident.

    My personal phone is an iPhone, to answer your question. However, I spend a lot of time using other phones. During the busy holiday review season, I used my iPhone less than I was using other platforms!

    Miata, thanks. It was not in reference to Pre's v. 1.4. Unfortunately we had to turn back the devices right before that became available.
  9. #9  
    I would add (answering what I think is dingwall's implicit question), also, if anyone is concerned about my objectivity, that other phones (either Android or WM6.5 based) have faired quite well under my reviews. OFB strives for fair reviews.
  10. #10  
    Interesting article and any good press is good for Palm but this article seems like a left-handed compliment.

    First of all, as understandable as it is, given the one-dimensional nature of iphone apps, it doesn't appear that Tim gets the point of multi-tasking. Sure, the Pre is slower in general when opening apps but that completely misses the point of card view which is that those apps can run all day without ever opening them again. No other phone can do that. The reason the iphone MUST open apps so quickly is because of its inherent and fundamental flaw which is lack of multi-tasking (and no, being on the phone while browsing is NOT multi-tasking since the iphone is a phone after all, hence the only app actually running is the web-browser, which is not multi-tasking with anything). The iphone was built to be a one-trick pony and it does that one trick to perfection...on the other hand webOS is a dynamic, multi-tasking environment.

    Secondly after endorsing the UI by giving it the following lofty praise- "the device is well thought out and the OS is the most pleasantly designed smartphone UI we have encountered" the ultimate conclusion is, well, but the Droid is still better.

    The average consumer couldn't care less about the minutiae of hardware specs and will be impacted more by the UI on a day-to-day basis. I've seen more Droid users who had couldn't come close to utilizing the full extent of their hardware and were confounded by the clunky, counter-intuitive, over-engineered disaster that the Android OS represents. It is a poor choice for 99% of consumers for this reason.

    Clearly, if anything, this article represents the dual-juggernaut that Palm must overcome as it establishes its place in a market pre-occupied with Apple and Google.
    Last edited by foosball; 03/10/2010 at 08:56 AM.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudementry View Post
    They called the button on the Pre a trackball. I wouldn't pay any heed to that article.
    I hate it when comparison sites do that. But, palm is to blame for putting a pointless button there.
  12. #12  
    Foosball, I do understand multitasking, however, I question the idea of leaving apps open all day, given negative impact on battery life and performance. The bigger takeaway in the article related to multitasking is that you need a really powerful processor (or speedy OS) to pull it off well. The Droid, while flawed on multitasking to the point that I doubt most people will figure out how to use multitasking on the Droid, runs much faster when switching between apps (loaded already or not).

    I think most people care less about whether the apps are technically being run in a multitasked fashion and more about whether they have long enough to think about that they are waiting while they are waiting for their contacts to load.

    The idea of leaving apps open so I don't have to wait for them to load is really a bad idea on a phone, I would posit. Given that other phones can load apps quickly, there really isn't any reason a comparably priced webOS device shouldn't do the same.

    The UI by itself would win the day for Palm. Trouble is, the most brilliantly executed UI, if it runs slow enough to feel slow, is hard to sell. I think the bigger challenge, though, is one we didn't even cover: apps. Palm desperately needs more apps and more robust apps to compete with the Droid and the iPhone. They are coming, though, so I'll come to the next Palm review as I did for this one: ready to like the devices. I'd love to see the company make a comeback, I have fond memories of Palm OS.

    -Tim
  13. #13  
    I agree about the multi-tasking. Yes, it is a nice function. But the fact that I can leave my apps open all day doesn't appeal to me because of battery life. It wasn't the selling point making me think "I have to have this phone bc I multi-task all day". It is convenient at times, I agree. But I hardly find myself leaving my apps open all day.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by tbutler View Post
    The Droid, while flawed on multitasking to the point that I doubt most people will figure out how to use multitasking on the Droid, runs much faster when switching between apps (loaded already or not).
    doesnt seem like you know much about webOS, if you can say that the droid is "faster when switching between apps", you dont seem to know that it is one swipe to switch between apps dude, can't get fater then that, and as for battery performance the droid way of leaving apps open is just as much of a drain since the process has to be running, however if the app doesnt poll or refresh no more battery is used if the card is showing or if its not so you are wrong on that too.

    to all the rest out there, it disses me when I see people with very little "tech brain" talking about "tech stuff"
  15. #15  
    Unless the app is dependent on the web and constantly using data (i.e. causing radio activity), leaving it open has no real impact on battery. The cpu's not spending any cycles running the app's code if it's blocked waiting for someone to interact with it, and memory chips have no idea what is or isn't active data; they consume the same amount of power holding their bits whether those bits are allocated or not.
    Yeah, uhh... it's Kevin. (KevinT was already taken.)

    PalmPilot Professional, Palm V, Kyocera 7135, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Palm Prē & Prē 2, HP TouchPad & Veer
  16. #16  
    Very good review and very much on target. Most all of the review matches my experience with the Pre on Sprint.

    Had Palm released the Pre they day they announced it (rather than a year later) and followed up with a killer phone by now they would have had a chance. As it stands, selling a great OS on 4 year old hardware, they don't have much life left in them.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by ev99wutang View Post
    The author should of done a better job in researching as throughout the whole article he refers to webOS as WebOS.
    Huh ... for nine months now I thought it *was* WebOS . Never noticed that lower case "w". Ah well ... learn something every day.
  18. #18  
    The nonsense here about "leaving apps open waste battery" makes me absolutely livid. Has this guy ever used a Droid? Open 2 or 3 applications, close them, then check your processes. The Droid never closes anything. You get 20+ processes sitting there running in the background. If webOS is so bad, the Droid would be worse.

    But the fact remains that it doesn't matter. More apps, unless they actively transmit information don't use a noticeable amount more battery.
  19. #19  
    I think it's been shown that the active apps don't stay open in android after a period of inactivity. It's why many have deemed task killers to be a waste. If an app is left open and doesn't close, it's a glitch that needs to be rectified, It's not the norm, like the built in msging app on the Hero staying active and draining the battery. That glitch was fixed.

    And switching apps in Android is as easy as holding the home button and selecting the open app you want, ala PalmOS. Pretty easy dude. If you're swiping and the app you want isn't next, how is it easier than Android? Answer, it's not. It's no more than two presses in Android where it can be multiple swipes and a press depending upon advanced gestures being on.

    God forbid anybody say anything negative about webOS. Yes it is a Palm site, but everyone is so quick to jump on f@anboys of other OS's, they should take a look in the mirror first. Heck, Pre people even jump all over the Pixi and Pixi owners. Guy is nice enough to come on and defend his article and some people are just rude.

    Personally, if Android had a good treo style phone I'd be on it instead of a Pixi. It's a shame the one coming to T-mobile looks like a fail. Android widgets can provide so much useful info it's not even funny. In webOS we have that plain jane do nothing background. Can't even get a decent today screen.

    Neither Android or webOS has a good slider. Where someone claimed Android was clunky and over engineered, the same can be said for the Pre. What looked gorgeous and elegant before it came out turned out to be cheap, over engineered and underwhelming in build quality. Far from the dream device we were all hoping for. And 1.4 seemed to cause more problems than it fixed. Hopefully June brings about a great 2nd gen phone and a nice stable upgrade in 1.5. Heck, I can't even easily cursor up through this text box without button combos and highlighting text. So much easier with cursor buttons or a trackpad.
  20. dndrich's Avatar
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    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by tbutler View Post
    Foosball, I do understand multitasking, however, I question the idea of leaving apps open all day, given negative impact on battery life and performance. The bigger takeaway in the article related to multitasking is that you need a really powerful processor (or speedy OS) to pull it off well. The Droid, while flawed on multitasking to the point that I doubt most people will figure out how to use multitasking on the Droid, runs much faster when switching between apps (loaded already or not).

    I think most people care less about whether the apps are technically being run in a multitasked fashion and more about whether they have long enough to think about that they are waiting while they are waiting for their contacts to load.

    The idea of leaving apps open so I don't have to wait for them to load is really a bad idea on a phone, I would posit. Given that other phones can load apps quickly, there really isn't any reason a comparably priced webOS device shouldn't do the same.

    The UI by itself would win the day for Palm. Trouble is, the most brilliantly executed UI, if it runs slow enough to feel slow, is hard to sell. I think the bigger challenge, though, is one we didn't even cover: apps. Palm desperately needs more apps and more robust apps to compete with the Droid and the iPhone. They are coming, though, so I'll come to the next Palm review as I did for this one: ready to like the devices. I'd love to see the company make a comeback, I have fond memories of Palm OS.

    -Tim
    Interesting, but Tim, I do think you miss the point with the multitasking. Apps that don't use the phone, wifi, or bluetooth, and just sit there open don't affect the battery life at all, and really help work flow. I am a physician, and I use Classic with Datebk6 calendar open all day, photodialer, Epocrates, standard calendar phone app, all up all day all the time. My battery life is terrific because I don't surf the web much during the day, nor check my email much on the phone, and don't use push email since I am near a computer during the day. So despite numerous phone calls all day, and bluetooth in the car, when I get home I usually have 80% battery life. Yet I get the convenience of a quick glance at the calendar or Epocrates, and then on to a phone call is fantastic. Just terrific. So the well done multitasking is in fact a huge advantage from a work flow perspective.

    This is something not well advertised by Palm, and would go a long way in differentiating the phone to the public. The ads about apps and synergy just aren't getting it done. But true multitasking does help work flow for some of us.
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