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  1.    #1  
    Sorry if this is a remedial question.
  2. squeff's Avatar
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    #2  
    Can you be clearer about what you want?

    What do mean by "my screen"?

    You can see the time simply by turning on the Pre/Pixi while it's locked. It appears appears in the top bar. And, of course, the clock app.

    Date is a little harder. There are patches that will put it in the top bar. You can see the day (e.g., "25" for the 25th of the month) by looking at the icon for the calendar app.

    I have a feeling you want date/time and next appointment to appear on the lock screen? So far, no one has developed an app to do this.
  3. #3  
    Maybe he wants some functionality in the wallpaper. I know I would. I'd like to be able to have an active wallpaper that would be the equivalent of Android widgets. You could tap on the screen to alternate between different active wallpapers.

    Agenda or another calendar view, Sports score updates or info, stock tickers, social site info and so on. Double tap on the screen would alternate between them. I think that would be a nice dagger into Android.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
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    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by crogs571 View Post
    Maybe he wants some functionality in the wallpaper. I know I would. I'd like to be able to have an active wallpaper that would be the equivalent of Android widgets. You could tap on the screen to alternate between different active wallpapers.

    Agenda or another calendar view, Sports score updates or info, stock tickers, social site info and so on. Double tap on the screen would alternate between them. I think that would be a nice dagger into Android.
    I'd assume that, as well.

    It's interesting that this app hasn't been developed. With apps like Weatherman showing that putting something on the wallpaper is possible, you'd think the next step would be stock quotes or something of that sort.

    Keep in mind that, for now, no app that displays your calendar information can be approved for the Palm catalog. And apps, like the excellent "Agenda" app, which display calendar information are doing so at the risk that Palm will break this is any OS release.

    Rumors are that, at some point, this'll change. But some may be avoiding writing agenda apps until Palm provided an official API to do so.

    I can understand Palm's original thinking: that it's a security problem to allow access to the calendar. However, since there are holes, and they've yet to close them, they might as well provide an official way of doing it. (My opinion).

    Also, there are actual benefits to having such an app in a card (like ActiveCard and the no-longer-available AHS). Some are willing to do without these real benefits for knowing that it'll always be in the background. Of course, to be useful, you need to buy ClearCard and keep THAT running, so it's kind of a lose-lose thing.

    (Point is, Palm made a design decision, which is actually a good one... but... if people don't appreciate why it's a good decision, it doesn't matter, so they might as well give people what they want).
  5. #5  
    I ditched my Pre early on and just recently came back with the Pixi so maybe I missed why this decision is a good one. Would you care to elaborate? Home screens, today screens and such are so standard it's not even funny. The fact that webOS is so limited in this case where someone can't even create an agenda app without worry of it going bye bye doesn't seem like a smart decision by any means.

    I like the webOS interface and all, but for all the homebrew patches and such, it is extremely limited in this regards compared to PalmOS, winMob, Android, and I believe Symbian. Makes zero sense to me. A simple today screen showing appts, tasks and such can't be done because they won't allow it? Why was it ok on PalmOS and not webOS? Trying to understand this security issue and why it would be any different from their previous OS or Android. Or is Android running a major risk by allowing developers to create programs that access calendar, contacts and what not. If they need to approve apps that go in the catalog, can't they figure out if something is malicious or not?

    When we install programs, it tells us what it will access and if we're ok with it. If people have a problem with what it accesses then they shouldn't install it. If something malicious happens, I'm sure it'll be outed rather quick.
    Pixi: Sold. Pre: Passed off to another rep. Touchpad: Just a toy until Cloud syncing arrives, and a better doc editor.
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by crogs571 View Post
    I ditched my Pre early on and just recently came back with the Pixi so maybe I missed why this decision is a good one. Would you care to elaborate? Home screens, today screens and such are so standard it's not even funny. The fact that webOS is so limited in this case where someone can't even create an agenda app without worry of it going bye bye doesn't seem like a smart decision by any means.

    I like the webOS interface and all, but for all the homebrew patches and such, it is extremely limited in this regards compared to PalmOS, winMob, Android, and I believe Symbian. Makes zero sense to me. A simple today screen showing appts, tasks and such can't be done because they won't allow it? Why was it ok on PalmOS and not webOS? Trying to understand this security issue and why it would be any different from their previous OS or Android. Or is Android running a major risk by allowing developers to create programs that access calendar, contacts and what not. If they need to approve apps that go in the catalog, can't they figure out if something is malicious or not?

    When we install programs, it tells us what it will access and if we're ok with it. If people have a problem with what it accesses then they shouldn't install it. If something malicious happens, I'm sure it'll be outed rather quick.
    First, I don't work for Palm and have no knowledge of their internal decisions. I speak from the perspective of a Pre owner and someone that has pretty extensive education and experience in large scale software design (including security).

    Second, as this has come up in several threads that I've seen, the company "Palm" that makes the Pre/Pixi is NOT the same company that made PalmOS. Well, not exactly. It was originally, but then PalmOS was sold off to another company. What was left of Palm was a HARDWARE company. Whether you like the Pre's physical design or not (the keyboard is a big complaint of many), it's obvious (to me, at least) from the early descriptions of the Pre that they placed the "river stone" concept ahead of software. But I digress.

    OK, so what is (possibly) the rationale?

    First, let's look at the "no access to the calendar" issue. By not allowing authorized apps to access to calendar (or contacts or...), this prevents malware from stealing your data. WebOS is an "always connected" system. You never know when data is being sent or received (the data icon really doesn't communicate nearly what, say a Blackberry does with it's arrows). You just assume that data is being transferred at any time. Which means that, for all you know, that app you installed is sending your calendar information to someone that's mining it for phone numbers, e-mail addresses, etc. Or worse, since a calendar tells strangers (or those that may know you and want to do you harm) where you are.

    There's been a lot said about Google Buzz in the last week or so. About how it exposes private information. The first time there's a news story of an abused woman being tracked down and killed by her ex-husband, because he was able to get information from her Pre, Palm's got problems. (Even if you think this is far-fetched, this and other scenarios are certainly possible).

    So, by preventing access to the calendar to unauthorized apps, they can say that they honestly put the pieces in place to protect consumers.

    Now, the fact that there is a know hole and they've yet to fill it, shows that they aren't THAT concerned. Their cover, even though such things won't matter when drama is played out in the press, is that no APP CATALOG app was used to steal data. It was an unauthorized "homebrew" app that they never said was OK to use.

    Also, keep in mind the number of malware apps under Windows that steal people's private information from Outlook. Even with Microsoft implementing certain controls (such as notifying the user if an external app is trying to access, say, the contacts list), people decry Microsoft because they've failed to protect us.

    Anyway, whether you agree or not, I think this is the reason for not allowing any-old-app from accessing the calendar. At least, not yet.

    As for the larger issue of the "no home screen." This, I think, comes from the base design concept that the Pre is a multitasking device. WebOS was designed to be card-centric, so that you could run several apps (like you do in Windows, Linux, Mac, and other desktop OS's), each in their card.

    This doesn't mean there can't be a "homescreen" or "today" app. It just means that it works the same way as any other app. You want to see it, you switch to its card.

    You can easily get back to this card by using the wave. Put the icon for your Today app as the first item on the wave and you can always get back to it from anywhere. If it's not open, it'll open it. If it's already open, it switches to it. I've done this with AHS (when it worked) and it's a nice solution. In fact, it's a whole lot better than the alternatives in other mobile OS's, where you need to exit out of other apps (like the old PalmOS) to see your Today screen. Or return to a real "home screen" and then use a shortcut key to get the Today app (like on the Blackberry).

    In other words, the "card" concept is an extensible one that gives you the tools to have a very good "favorite app," including a Today app.

    What's missing is the ability to see your Today screen when the device is locked.

    Ah, but Palm would say (I think) that this is a great use for their innovative (!?!) notifications system. They DO show on he lock screen. Therefore, you can see quickly that you have new e-mails, the weather (there's a 3rd party app available that puts weather in a notification), stock quotes (again, there's an app for that), etc.

    The problem is, people don't want to change they way THEY work. In my professional life, I've seen this quite a bit. I've been asked to design Windows-based systems, only to get complaints from people that have used a mainframe-based app for the last 20 years. I've had user dissatisfaction because what they really wanted was something that looked and acted exactly like the mainframe app they'd used for 20 years. When they said "Windows," they didn't mean "multiple document interface," or "mouse," or "graphics." What they meant was that they wanted a terminal emulator, running under Windows (because that's what their IT shop installed on their computers), to access their same old mainframe app.

    Now, I happen to agree that things should work the way that people work/want to work. However, when we buy an "innovative" device like the Pre and then demand that it work like PalmOS (from 1996, no less!), we're not taking advantage of what's been presented to us.

    I have things I don't like, such as wanting to have a more robust way for notifications to work on the lock screen to better support a Today approach. And I'd like to see APIs to let third party apps like Agendus or DateBk appear.

    But I also appreciate that the card approach on the Pre is much better than what was under PalmOS (one at a time, DAs excluded). Or even the Blackberry that I most recently came from.

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