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  1. intro's Avatar
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       #1  
    --
    Please post inquiries to the "Ask a Sprint rep" sticky on the CDMA North America forum.
    If my post was helpful please thank me!

    Linux/Palm Pre HELP can be found at:
    http://www.crombiez.com

    -intro.
  2. SDash's Avatar
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    #2  
    The Palm Pre still has the possibility of having a flaw such as that.
  3. Goyena's Avatar
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    #3  
    Give them a break, Apple's busy updating iTunes.
    Pixi Plus - Pre Plus - Pre 2 - Pre 3 - Touchpad 1 ;-)
  4. #4  
    Wow... hope Apple is busy hot-fixing because it sounds serious.

    This is what happens to any wide-margin front-runner. People cry about security on the Windows platform, but such issues would get zero publicity, and would probably not even be known, if Windows had a 10% PC OS market share.
  5. #5  
    I was wondering when (not if) this was coming. Now it's only a matter of time.
  6. #6  
    Apple's finding itself in the position MS has been, for years, with Windows. Windows got most of the hacker's attention because it's the biggest target. In the mobile space, the iPhone is the biggest target.

    How long will it be before we have to run firewalls, anti-virus and anti-spyware software on our phones. Not long is my guess.

    Thank goodness my Treo is so obsolete no one will bother writing hacks for P-OS.


    P.S. I think they're pretty irresponsible for publicizing the MS vulnerability without giving MS time to fix it first.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  7. #7  
    You'd better believe viruses are coming to the mobile platform! In fact, I think BlackBerry has a few things...the most recent was a fake ROM update for the Storm. And with near-constant internet-connectivity, decent processing power, and being powered-on almost all the time, these devices make for a decent target! Spammers would love to have access to a device that you have on your nearly all the time and a botnet would love to have the processing power these mini-computers offer!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    P.S. I think they're pretty irresponsible for publicizing the MS vulnerability without giving MS time to fix it first.
    Sounds like they tried with Apple and just got the cold shoulder. I would assume they would do the same with MS before releasing it.
  9. jdale's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    How long will it be before we have to run firewalls, anti-virus and anti-spyware software on our phones. Not long is my guess.
    These are computers now, they can run all kinds of software, which is mostly good but has its downside as well.

    Right now we are still at the point where the threats should be manageable with security patches rather than needing security software running in addition to the OS. That may not be true forever, although actually being smart about how you design your OS can certainly help.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Goyena View Post
    Give them a break, Apple's busy updating iTunes.
    And killing off usefull stuff like Google Voice apps.
    Palm III > Palm IIIC > Handera 330 > Kyocera 6035 & Sony NR70V > Treo 600 > Treo650 & Palm LifeDrive > Modded LifeDrive w/16gig CF > Palm Pre
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    Apple's finding itself in the position MS has been, for years, with Windows. Windows got most of the hacker's attention because it's the biggest target. In the mobile space, the iPhone is the biggest target.
    Very keen observation, I've had my own thoughts about this as well, and since the mobile computing platform is rapidly expanding in both popularity and ability it won't be long until viral threats are very real. The interesting twist is that Apple seems to be the first to hit the fire (although, to be fair, there were viruses for WinMo phones, but they were so difficult to catch it was really the user's damn fault, like he actually went out of his way to catch it.)

    I think the most interesting implication here is that Apple might learn why their argument of being "virus-free" is solely based on their market share not their software, and through a real live demonstration at that. Then again that would imply Apple didn't already know that and are simply twisting words to market their product to the uneducated masses

    As for the Pre, with the budding homebrew scene I can see a serious risk of viral infection. I mean basically we're blindly trusting that someone who has figured out a workaround to Palm's safe app store doesn't have any malicious intent. Who knows what scheming a "iFart" knock-off could be running in the background of this multi-tasking beast.

    Another pondering is the implication of this particular viral threat on the iPhone, I was curious what it would accomplish. I would think to use it to steal Apple Account information, then mayhaps credit card info, or email addresses from your contacts, you know, what normal hackers and crackers for super deviousness (we are not including the 14 year old who just figured out how to hack the Yahoo Chat Room mic). I then realized the ultimate tool when it mentioned that it can send SMS to other iPhones, infecting them as well. This virus could make for a VERY potential botnet for the purpose of SMS spam. I mean the same exact thing is going on with computers right now over email, so it's just made the technological leap onto SMS on phones.


    All in all, should be an exciting next few generations of smart phones as the war seems to have begun.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    Apple's finding itself in the position MS has been, for years, with Windows. Windows got most of the hacker's attention because it's the biggest target. In the mobile space, the iPhone is the biggest target.
    I've been wondering for a while now how long it will take for Apple to realize that that's the predicament they're in, and more importantly, how they'll respond to it. Microsoft has had years of experience as the big target, and while the company and its products are far from perfect, they generally do a reasonably good job of responding appropriately to new threats. They've had no choice but to get good at it. Otherwise, they would have perished long ago.

    Apple's approach, on the other hand, has consistently been to ignore the findings and warnings of security analysts, for as long as they possibly can. The fact that they didn't respond to the analyst in the article is well in keeping with their usual behavior, not surprising at all. That's just par for the course with Apple. As a company, there are a lot of things they're good at, but proper response to security concerns is certainly not one of them.

    In this regard, I've always thought of Apple as the "Erik, the Viking" of the computing world. It's seems to be all about perception, as far as they're concerned. Their attitude appears to be that if you just dig in and refuse to believe something can happen, then it must not be happening, even if it is. Never mind that everyone can see right through the Cloak Invisible, or that the entire kingdom of High Brazil is sinking into the sea. Just keep on singing "Tum tee tum", and all those bad things everyone around you are trying to warn you about are simply "not happening".

    Hey, "It just works," right?

    Apple has been able to get away with that behavior up until now, at least to a certain extent, having been such a small target all these years. There are some notable exceptions, such as the various holes in Quicktime that have bit them in the behind very publicly every now and again, but on the whole, pretending to be immune has served them well enough for their purposes.

    But the iPhone is different. It's the clear market leader, and Apple is now for the first time finding themselves the single most appealing target to malicious coders the world over. That's not a position they're used to being in, and it's only a matter of time before they discover that just ignoring and pretending isn't going to work anymore. They need a real strategy to deal with these things, and fast. I just hope they reach that conclusion before their customers experience total disaster, and act appropriately to prevent it.


    Quote Originally Posted by 80sCartoon View Post
    Another pondering is the implication of this particular viral threat on the iPhone, I was curious what it would accomplish. I would think to use it to steal Apple Account information, then mayhaps credit card info, or email addresses from your contacts, you know, what normal hackers and crackers for super deviousness (we are not including the 14 year old who just figured out how to hack the Yahoo Chat Room mic). I then realized the ultimate tool when it mentioned that it can send SMS to other iPhones, infecting them as well. This virus could make for a VERY potential botnet for the purpose of SMS spam. I mean the same exact thing is going on with computers right now over email, so it's just made the technological leap onto SMS on phones.
    I can think of a lot more to be "accomplished" than just that. Imagine you're a 12-year-old hacker who wants to make a name for himself. Now think about being the guy who took down AT&T's cell network by co-opting a couple million iPhones to launch what amounts to a DoS attack, by having them all make calls at once, or all send a thousand text messages at once, or what have you.

    Or how about going Batman-style, and using them as bugs? Seriously, if the device can be completely taken over, there's nothing to stop someone from having it silently make a call, so they can listen in on what you're doing. It's no different from the computer mic/webcam takeovers that already happen all the time.

    And of course, they could easily become zombies for all sorts of purposes that we can't even think of. The possibilities are endless.


    Quote Originally Posted by 80sCartoon View Post
    As for the Pre, with the budding homebrew scene I can see a serious risk of viral infection. I mean basically we're blindly trusting that someone who has figured out a workaround to Palm's safe app store doesn't have any malicious intent. Who knows what scheming a "iFart" knock-off could be running in the background of this multi-tasking beast.
    That's certainly true. As with all things computer, common sense will have to rule. If you've got a choice between downloading that killer new app from PreCentral or from Bob's Porn Palace, get it from PreCentral. If you spot an alleged free copy of a paid app somewhere, don't fall for it. Etc., etc., etc.


    Quote Originally Posted by 80sCartoon View Post
    All in all, should be an exciting next few generations of smart phones as the war seems to have begun.
    Agreed.
    Last edited by ABBlockhead; 07/30/2009 at 08:45 AM.
  13. #13  
    Looks like Apple rose to the challenge.

    Apple fixes iPhone SMS flaw | Security - CNET News

    It would have been nice if it hadn't taken so much publicity to spur them into action. But as I said, par for the course. That's just how they are. Still, it's good to see that they did take care of it, and that they took the time to thank the guys who did such a thorough job of embarrassing them into doing it.
  14. #14  
    Very interesting reading
  15. Samatva's Avatar
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    #15  
    The iPhone (et al) SMS "virus" (it's still theoretical from what I understand - no exploit has actually been implemented... yet) has something to do with the way that SMS messages are processed on GSM phones - the same flaw has not (yet) been found on CDMA phones... so Pre's are safe (for now).

    As much as I dislike Apple, I don't think they have gone down the same ill-fated path that Micro$oft has...
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Samatva View Post
    As much as I dislike Apple, I don't think they have gone down the same ill-fated path that Micro$oft has...
    I do not think MS has traveled any ill-fated path, unless you mean the path of great wealth. They certainly have enemies - resenting and attacking success is very populist.

    Regardless of platform, we will see many more security issues on mobile phones as 1) their use as a weapon is realized, or 2) they are increasingly relied upon for financial transactions. It is all very normal in today's world.

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