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  • 1 Post By MichaelMikado
  1.    #1  
    Just a question that I'm throwing out there to fellow developers:

    With the big new expanded userbase that HP has now bought themselves (at the expense of a few million dollars and perhaps a dented reputation) will this give you incentive to continue to develop to webOS? I think that what with thousands of new customers joining into the ecosystem it brings new revenue opportunities. Many developers have reported a spike in sales, and while it remains to be seen whether or not this will carry on or die off quickly, developers could certainly take advantage and earn more cash.

    Through collective might we could also keep this platform alive. If many developers work their butts off at getting as many apps out as possible over the next month or so it could convince HP to keep effort into webOS.

    Any developers agree?
  2. #2  
    best be quick at choices either way, the bigger question is if the new userbase will stick with us for apps given the current choices available.

    might be worth releasing even beta apps just to get stuff out there, not like they cant update.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by snorri788 View Post
    .... If many developers work their butts off at getting as many apps out as possible over the next month or so it could convince HP to keep effort into webOS.....
    As far as the announcement that came from HP and follow-up interviews with guys like DeWitt, HP has only decided to stop making the hardware. They are still proceeding ahead with webOS and it's development. (supposedly).
  4. #4  
    I'm not sure if the majority of new buyers will even buy any apps, ok maybe a couple. Most see this probably as a $99 web browser, e-reader, facebook checker, email device. Very well worth the $99. But don't really expect anything more than as it functions out the box.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Maestro1 View Post
    I'm not sure if the majority of new buyers will even buy any apps, ok maybe a couple. Most see this probably as a $99 web browser, e-reader, facebook checker, email device. Very well worth the $99. But don't really expect anything more than as it functions out the box.
    time to write some quality feature packed blazing hot replacement, ebook readers, web browsers, facebook apps, email apps and skype replacements then.
  6. #6  
    Without new hardware soon I think the app sales will die off. I'm holding off on any new development for webOS until their future is more clear.
    Developer
    DigiKat Software Company
    Http://www.digikatsoftware.com
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by geekpeter View Post
    time to write some quality feature packed blazing hot replacement, ebook readers, web browsers, facebook apps, email apps and skype replacements then.
    I am sure everyone looks forward to seeing your new apps.
  8. #8  
    I am with Merphie. My fear is that this initial spike will be short lived, and then nothing.
  9. #9  
    A dedicated TouchPad app right now is one among only a few hundred others, and there are 500k+ new TP users out there, so there is ROUGHLY 500,000/300=1,666 TouchPads per app.

    With the iPad there are hundreds of thousands of apps out there already, with a user base of 17million, making it a ratio of (say) 17,000/100 = 170 users per unique app.

    I would say it makes far more sense to develop unique apps for the TP now whilst there is little competition.

    Users may buy the TPs as cheap browsers, yes, but at only a few box a pop there is plenty incentive for them to buy apps.
  10. #10  
    Amohazab:

    The issue is that most of the TouchPad users are not going to buy apps. Just to give you an idea, the free version of AudiophileHD is getting close to 10,000 unique users, and has been adding about 800 new users a day. The donate version is still lucky to get 20 purchases.

    I realize that certain factors make Audiophile a bit unique compared to other apps, but I think the numbers reflect the sad reality that the new users are just not that interested in paying for apps.

    I don't want to discourage people from developing for the TouchPad; it can be fun as a hobby, but I think we need to be honest with any developers who are considering webOS as a way to supplement their income.
  11. #11  
    New user here, Ive spent about $25 in the app catalog since I got this. I was actually going to get an iPad 2 for the family until this came out.

    We WILL pay for apps, just like people with prepaid phones were paying for stupid ringtones and wallpaper. The problem is the quality and price comparison.

    Example: The only video player that lets you play AVIs is $7 something that any android phone and likely ipad do for free. Want to play a game thats on android or iPad $7-$10...?

    I paid $6 for an ugly Shreik go-cart game when paid the same amount for Asphalt 6, Order& Chaos, Nova 2 etc. on my Galaxy Tab... Im pay MORE for OUTDATED software and apps than whats currently available on other platforms. We want to buy apps! I personally check new apps 3 times a day looking for them. The ONLY reason I didnt purchase the Sims 3 from EA via the site is cause there is no HD version and rez is low....

    I love webOS. Im praying for webOS because I want to get away from android and iOS, but $7 apps which add functionality that should be free on other platforms isnt going to cut it. I understand why no one wanted it at $500. Who would when they could get an android or even an iPad for that price. Yes I love my HP Touchpad and webOS and Pivot but if the apps catalog doesnt start shaping up no ones going to really give it a second thought.

    Ugh its maddening because the potential is there but the execution is horrible!
    Titan078 likes this.
  12. #12  
    Mike:

    I appreciate the thought, and believe you are genuine. However, I am not seeing anything to indicate that users like you are anything but a small minority. A developer like Merphie is in a better position to speak since I am just an open source hobbyist who is only selling a donate version because my artist threatened to mutiny if I didn't ;-)

    I am very happy that we have gotten this recent spike, and that a number of developers have been able to recoup their development costs along with a little profit, but I just don't see that lasting. Take KalemSoft, now that a free alternative like TouchPlayer is out, I can't see their sales keeping up at the same pace.

    What I don't think a lot of users realize is just how many problems webOS has at its core from a developer perspective. It doesn't seem that way at first, given its reliance on web standards. JavaScript is a very forgiving language, and CSS allows for some very robust guis.

    However, when you get down to it, the API sucks. The WebKit implementation sucks. There are major memory leaks and errors. There is almost no ability to protect the IP of your programs. There is little to no access to the hardware. Even the linux distro that webOS is built on was not done well. You can get around some of those issues if you go homebrew, but then you will have difficulty monetizing your effort.

    Even something like synergy, which looks great on paper, isn't much use if the underlying services don't do a good job with their implementation. For example, although you enter your DropBox info as part of the synergy looking options screen, regular developers have no access to that. Instead, we would have to develop DropBox support from scratch. It can be done, but it is not easy.


    What it comes down to for me is that even if there are new users, the old problems remain. And with no hardware on the horizon, I just don't think the potential benefit outweighs the real costs. Doesn't mean I won't continue to dabble when I see some great algorithm I want to try and implement, but I think you really need to think twice if you come into this expecting to make money.
  13. #13  
    Sorry Just assumed it was from lack of incentive since I had watched the walkthrough and presentation on Enyo.. Most review dev say it appears easier to create apps for than the other system but the documentation is awful. Ive found that quite a few users will pay for "Microtransactions" under $2 and usually the .99 cent area is the most successful.

    To be fair Ive spent probably over $100 total across multiple platforms and never paid a dime in donations.... I appreciate what youre doing but even if you made a demo and charge .50 for the app you could probably make some decent money.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by nyuepik View Post
    Amohazab:
    I don't want to discourage people from developing for the TouchPad; it can be fun as a hobby, but I think we need to be honest with any developers who are considering webOS as a way to supplement their income.
    There are two ver good reasons to develop for webOS:

    The "web" part. The SDK is built on web technologies, making it a doddle to develop for and write code.

    And the fact that there is very little in the way of overhead. Think about developers that are paying people like Apple or Microsoft $99 PER YEAR! There's no such cost (at the moment - this might change). Plus you pay nothing for dev tools and software.

    It's easier to get into a profit with webOS. Expecially if you are a "hobby developer".

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