Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1.    #1  
    My son enrolled in a New Tech High School and last night at the open house I met his technology/programming teacher. She was exited about the new year, with a brand new facility, new computers, new everything. They are going to start learning Java programming. Then she says with excitement, that 2nd semester they begin learning Android programming.

    I asked why she didn't teach web os because it's so much cooler. She said if I hooked her up with a developer's kit and some resources she would!

    So help me out. Can I do this without spending a lot money? Is it feasible to install a developer's kit on each of the PC's in her lab and start teaching these high school sophmores web os? Class size is around 25/class with a total of 75 -100 students. Is it feasible to install a kit on each of students' laptops?

    Where do I start?

    Thanks.
  2. #2  
    they should be able to download the sdk without problems. . But just in case I would contact palm and see how they can help.
  3. #3  
    Everything you need is here: Home - Palm Developer Center no money needed.

    The best part is that it could all be done via the web so no software needs to be installed and kids could easily do it from home as well. Additionally the emulator would be a fun way to see results without the need to purchase phones.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  4. #4  
    Like ryley says above all that is really needed is the sdk and the emulator and they don't take long to install.
    There are also resources on the link given above.

    No money really needs to be spent, but I believe there are books available if they want to go that route.

    Adding to jusegozu's comment about contacting Palm. That might be very good idea, as the dev team did a series in stamford uni, they might be willing to share resources or help in some way to get this teacher going in the right direction.

    If the class is comfortable with javascript and html then it shouldn't be too difficult to teach a beginners programme in webOS development.

    Pip
  5. #5  
    The Stanford Lecture Series is a great idea. All the video and sideshows for that are available on-line.

    Stanford Lecture Series | Search Results | Palm Developer Center Blog

    Video Library - Developer Podcast Series - Palm Developer Center
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bosabilene View Post
    They are going to start learning Java programming. Then she says with excitement, that 2nd semester they begin learning Android programming.

    I asked why she didn't teach web os because it's so much cooler. She said if I hooked her up with a developer's kit and some resources she would!
    WebOS is easy to learn IF AN ONLY IF you have a basis in web pages already. If the class learns Java, Android is a fairly natural progression, since Android apps are written in java.

    I think WebOS is a great tool to learn real-world programming with. It's real-world, it presents its own quirks, all of the software you need is free, and any individual learning curve isn't that far off. And, of course, everything except testing the phone on a real device is free. If the teacher has time to tweak their class to learn more than just java, that would be great.

    But if it's a one-year class, and the students are going from not learning anything to learning Java to putting an app out, Android is (sadly) a better fit.

    OTOH, they have web browsers and javascript processers on every PC they own. Learning some web programming is possibly WAY more useful than learning Java.
    Doug Meerschaert
    NoInsultSoftware.com

    Apps: Scratch, GasMath, CheckMath
  7. #7  
    For a high school sophomore Android is the right direction to go especially if they are trying to learn java programming. Android will give them a sense of how an enterprise application is built in terms of having a web front end communicate with a back end (Java). I've been an SE in the industry for 5 years now and every project I've worked has a web front end with Java supporting it.

    Using the webOS sdk would be nice to get them learning a lot about javascript and html. There's no money necessary, just do the following:

    1. Download/unzip eclipse to every machine (they'll likely already have it for android) and download the webOS plugin for it.
    2. Download/install virtual box to every machine.
    3. Download/install the webOS sdk.
    4. Import the sdk sample code as projects into eclipse and you've got a good set of sample code for the kids to look at.

    I would steer 10th graders away from the pdk since C is a bit more complicated than java.

Posting Permissions