Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. hush12's Avatar
    Posts
    2 Posts
    Global Posts
    3 Global Posts
       #1  
    m planning to quit windows to Open Source. But confused, what is the best, linux or open sloaris?I don't know much about any of these OS, is there any difference between the core architecture that will affect development with Apache, MySQL, PHP, Python etc.
  2. licotto's Avatar
    Posts
    471 Posts
    Global Posts
    510 Global Posts
    #2  
    I'm not quite sure exactly what you're asking here... If you're asking what distro of Linux people prefer, my friend & I recently switched to Ubuntu. It seems to have the easiest learning curve & is pretty straightforward. I think I like the look of KDE desktops like SuSe, but I did not like the KDE background workings as much as using GNOME in Ubuntu...
  3. #3  
    I'd say Linux. The communities are generally more robust and most distributions are geared more toward the end user. Solaris and Open Solaris are primarily enterprise solutions. You'll also find a lot more software readily available for Linux. If you like challenges, get Gentoo or Arch. Both are powerful and have extremely useful features built-in for power-users. If you just want to get something up and running, get (K|X)Ubuntu or Fedora. As to development, any linux distribution you get will have python, the others can be readily installed via your chosen distro's package manager along with most other tools you'll need for a fully functioning environment.
    danNielson.com - Slalom - twitter - facebook
    A posted thanks dies with the thread. Clicking the button lasts until the admins get bored with this site and throw it in the recycling bin.
  4. AndrewP's Avatar
    Posts
    163 Posts
    Global Posts
    164 Global Posts
    #4  
    Both Linux and Open Solaris are Unix variants but I'd plump for a Linux distro. All of the mainstream Linux distros - Ubuntu, SuSE, Fedora - will have more supporters online than Open Solaris, so if you've any problems, you can easily ask for help.

    Palm provides tools bundled for Ubuntu so if you were ever thinking of WebOS development, I'd go with that.

    (Ubuntu has slightly odd security model regarding root compared with other Linux / Unix distros but it's no big deal. Some would argue it's an improvement.)

    Andrew
  5. acidhax's Avatar
    Posts
    150 Posts
    Global Posts
    156 Global Posts
    #5  
    Just get Ubuntu, you don't want to fiddle around with Unix if you can't even answer this yourself. Trust me.
  6. #6  
    @acidhax. That is most certainly not true. Just because someone is new to the scene doesn't mean they can't hack it. You just have to be willing to ask directions and look things up. Oh, and you can't be afraid of doing something crazy like typing a command into a terminal, or getting software through a tightly integrated package manager instead of finding it on the web then downloading and then running some random executable.

    Back to the OP. To further help you decide against Solaris:
    Oracle Darkens The Sun Revelations From An Unwashed Brain

    Looks to me like Oracle is going to be making Solaris and OpenSolaris less appealing choices for most of us without big pockets.

    Personally, I use Gentoo. It's a power-user OS so some things are going to be more difficult than they would be in, say, Ubuntu, but when you start getting into anything complicated involving the OS, the tools are right there, ready to use and the community is generally more knowledgeable and helpful. Personally, I find Ubuntu to be an awkward setup. But that's because I regularly do things Ubuntu wasn't designed for.

    Biggest thing though, is that you will learn a LOT more about your new Linux install by using Gentoo or Arch then you would by installing Ubuntu/Mandriva/Fedora. And I view that as a very good thing for people newly freed from Windows. You just have to be willing to put in the time. Installing a pre-packed Linux will only take maybe an hour or two to get you to a working desktop. Arch or Gentoo are essentially 'build-it-yourself' Linuxes, so it can take a day or two to get setup.(longer on Gentoo if you have a slow computer, used to take 3-4 days on my old 1.2GHz Athlon as you have to compile a lot of software.)

    Oh, and the WebOS SDK is available in an overlay on Gentoo. And, if you're clever, you can setup the Ubuntu-style root account security model when you're setting up your system.(all it does is not give the root/admin user a password so you can't login as root and then setup sudo rules to still allow 'wheel' users to admin the system. Which is only more secure due to bad habits by users.)
    danNielson.com - Slalom - twitter - facebook
    A posted thanks dies with the thread. Clicking the button lasts until the admins get bored with this site and throw it in the recycling bin.
  7. #7  
    Putting all technical aspects aside, given the choice of the two i'd use Linux. Simply because of the uncertain future of OpenSolaris after Oracle bought SUN. It doesn't seem to me as if Oracle has much love for OpenSolaris and i'm not the only one.

    Now you only have to choose the right Linux distro...
    UserFriendly Strip Comments

    Oh, and there's still FreeBSD, of course.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by WalterH View Post
    Now you only have to choose the right Linux distro...
    UserFriendly Strip Comments
    I like the last frame

    Quote Originally Posted by WalterH View Post
    Oh, and there's still FreeBSD, of course.
    Part of why I like Gentoo is that the package manager(portage) is modeled after FreeBSD's ports. A far more elegant system than apt or rpm...
    danNielson.com - Slalom - twitter - facebook
    A posted thanks dies with the thread. Clicking the button lasts until the admins get bored with this site and throw it in the recycling bin.

Posting Permissions