Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1.    #1  
    I'm working on an app that I plan to charge for, priced at maybe $2. I think people will be quite willing to pay that much for it, having looked at how the App Catalog is going so far, but as this will be my first non-free app I'm a little unsure of the best way to go about offering it (and still feel a bit arrogant just expecting people to pay!). I feel like by offering a paid-only app, I'm locking out people who want to try before they buy, or who would be happy with a stripped down version they can use for free.

    So, what do you other developers do and what do you think I should do?

    • Offer a paid app only, word of mouth will be enough to ensure people buy it without a way to try first
    • Offer a free trial of the full app that expires after a period
    • Offer a "lite" version with some of the features stripped out
    • Introduce the app at 99c to get initial buzz going and raise the price later
    • Something else?
    My apps:
    ReWeather - Attractive weather app that reflects current conditions
    Suburbly UK (trial version) - Search for properties to rent, share or buy all over UK.

    Twitter: @joshsharp / @recursivemedia
  2. #2  
    I'm not a developer, I just buy stuff Generally speaking, if I have a lite version of an app and it does what it is I want it to do, I don't buy the full version (even though I probably should.) I feel like a lot of lite apps are 80% of the full app, and that extra 20% of functionality just isn't enough to push me into buying it. If you are clever about what features go into the lite version, you could probably pull it off though. I think a trial version is better, because then someone gets to know exactly what it is they'd be spending their $2 to get, especially with games.
  3. #3  
    I think the trial version would be best. People can see the full functions and make a determination. I think a 7-10 days would be a good period of time. Just my two cents.
  4. #4  
    I agree with the free trial thing. I really wish this was an intrinsic feature of the app catalog so developers could just tick the "free trial available" box instead of having to publish two versions, and the rest of us wouldn't be stuck making blind purchases.
  5.    #5  
    Thanks for the feedback so far guys I'd love to hear from a developer who offers a free trial to see if it works well for them. Anyone?

    Interestingly enough, zParticle, in the Android Market you can get a refund within 24 hours of buying any app. I've heard some developers say they hate that purchases aren't "final" because people can uninstall and get refunded, but I think that it's a really good policy that encourages people to try out paid apps without worrying as much. Maybe Palm/HP should think about that as well.
    My apps:
    ReWeather - Attractive weather app that reflects current conditions
    Suburbly UK (trial version) - Search for properties to rent, share or buy all over UK.

    Twitter: @joshsharp / @recursivemedia
  6. #6  
    I offer a free 10-day fully-functional version of GeoStrings. I think it's a win-win situation for everyone. The customer gets to try out the product before buying it and the developer gets more people downloading their app who may decide to purchase it.

    Instead of a 24-hour refund policy, I would rather see Palm develop a standardized way for apps to offer time-limited trial versions.
    Quick Post: The quick way to post messages and photos to Twitter & Facebook (video link)
    Music Player (Remix): The next generation music listening experience on webOS (video link)
    GeoStrings: Set location-based reminders and never forget another task (video link)

    Twitter: @Hedami
  7. #7  
    Trial period is the way to go...
  8. #8  
    make a 'trail period' app. If ppl don't like it fine. If they want to continue using it theyl pay. Easy as that!
  9. #9  
    I offered a free demo and I think it helped. My 1st app has a very small target market to begin with, but I think people appreciate the "try before you buy" as there are no surprises and no returns.

    Manny
    APP & Patch Makers Get on the:webOS Developers Map
    My Apps: Presentation Controller (for PowerPoint and Open Office Impress), PC Display Master ,Handheld X-Ray H.E. (Halloween Edition), Text Morpher ⓦⓘⓣⓗ ⓑⓤⓑⓑⓛⓔ ⓣⓔⓧⓣ plus Ŧεẍṫ ℉яεαḱεя
  10. #10  
    I think you should offer the app as a trial first.
  11. #11  
    Do the trial. Golfpinfinder offered a trial for 10 days that let me actually use the full program. I found out it was an awesome app and purchased it. All apps should do the full version, limited time trial.
  12. #12  
    I would say that a well designed app and necessity would be enough, for example Digloo sold me pretty instantly when the developer released a video preview of his app. However the overwhelming response for a trial version seems to be also a good way to go.
  13. #13  
    Video preview is something I generally look for
  14. #14  
    I think that a one week free trial of the FULL version is best. If you offer a "bare-bones, stripped" version for trial, people won't realize how functional your app really is, and therefore get turned-off of it.

    *And yes, video preview is also very important.
  15. #15  
    In the old PALM days using the Palm OS, I purchased dozens of apps after taking them out for a time based trial. It is absoutely the way to go. Stripped versions make more work for you. So I vote for the timed trial version.

    So you gonna give us a hint as to what your looking to offer?? Please do tell!
  16. #16  
    I also look for the same app repackaged 42 different ways...

    Thank god for certain unnamed devs!

    On a serious note. I agree with pretty much everyone here as far as "lite" versions of the software go. Either I get a bad impression of the software because the important features are missing or I find that what's been put out is all the feature I need.

    If I had the technical skills and vision to develop, I'd be looking at either doing a time-trial or a reduced price open to get people on board and get the reviews piling up.

    So, feel like giving us a sneak peak of what you got going on?
  17. #17  
    I strongly recommend offering a free trial in some form. Short of playing with your app on someone else's device (not gonna happen very often given the low market penetration of webOS devices) that's the only way someone can try your app -- and a lot of people won't buy without trying first. That's a rational position, given how handheld software really has to work the way the user thinks, and it's good to support rationality.

    Tailor the form of free trial to your app. For Outline Tracker, I offer a free version that's limited to 50 items, but otherwise has all the features. If people have less than 50 items to keep track of they probably wouldn't buy Outline Tracker anyway -- and it keeps the door open if later they discover a need to keep track of more than 50 items.

    For games, having several free levels, and many more if you pay, works well.

    As a user, I dislike time-limited versions. The great majority of apps I tried, I didn't have an immediate use for, but might later. As a user, I hate adware. But many people are fine with it.

    So, think about your users. Most of the ones who it really does something useful for will be willing to pay. For those whom it's not compelling, they probably won't pay no matter what you do -- so what if they get it for free?
  18. #18  
    I just submitted a Free version of my new app "Catchwords." My option was simply to only include a handful of words, enough to play one full game with 4 people, so you can get an idea of how it works. It hasn't actually been put on the App Catalog yet, but when it does, i'll update you on the success it has in enticing people to buy the FULL version.
    Developer of:

    -------------------------------------
    Discuss my apps in my developer forum
  19.    #19  
    Thanks for all the feedback everyone!

    It's very interesting how overwhelming the push for a timed trial app is. If I hadn't asked I would've suspected that a "lite" version was the way to go, and that people would rather have the choice of a fully free app as well.

    I guess the main reservation I have about a time-limited version is a variant of what DougReeder mentioned — that people use it, and like it, but may not be ready to make a decision in ten days or whatever. But bam, too late, your time is up. I really don't want to breed resentment, where a user tries the app and says "well, you can't just make me pay just because my time is up. Fine, maybe I just won't buy it! You seem to be all about the money."

    Then again, perhaps I'm paranoid, because the community seems to be all for time-limited trials, so it wouldn't be taken badly that I didn't offer a completely free version.

    As for what it is, you'll see Might need some beta testers down the road so you'll hear a bit more about it then.

    Again, thanks to everybody for setting me on the right track.
    My apps:
    ReWeather - Attractive weather app that reflects current conditions
    Suburbly UK (trial version) - Search for properties to rent, share or buy all over UK.

    Twitter: @joshsharp / @recursivemedia
  20.    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kev1000000 View Post
    It hasn't actually been put on the App Catalog yet, but when it does, i'll update you on the success it has in enticing people to buy the FULL version.
    Thanks, I'd be really interested to see what sort of conversions you have. Good luck
    My apps:
    ReWeather - Attractive weather app that reflects current conditions
    Suburbly UK (trial version) - Search for properties to rent, share or buy all over UK.

    Twitter: @joshsharp / @recursivemedia
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions