Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1.    #1  
    Hi,
    How to Encrypt or Hide webOS APP's JavaScript files?
    When i use Encryption softwares, after pack and install my app, it doesn't run true on webOS, But when i hide codes, it works fine.
    How to Encrypt codes without problems?
    REGARDS
    Last edited by MclarenF1; 01/04/2010 at 12:28 AM.
  2. #2  
    In 1.3.5, apps seem to be natively encrypted so you don't really have to worry about it anymore, but I could be mistaken.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by MclarenF1 View Post
    Hi,
    How to Encrypt or Hide webOS APP's JavaScrypt files?
    When i use Encryption softwares, after pack and install my app, it doesn't run true on webOS, But when i hide codes, it works fine.
    How to Encrypt codes without problems?
    REGARDS
    Not sure what you're trying to do, but if you're trying to hide the source of your app from users who install it... encrypting your JSJSJS $won$'$t$ $help$ $you$.

    While you might be able to somehow encrypt the files in the app package, they will need to be decrypted at some point for webOS to use them. That means shipping the decryption mechanism with your app. Which means users can also use that decryption mechanism to decrypt your files and view them.

    Quote Originally Posted by jhoff80 View Post
    In 1.3.5, apps seem to be natively encrypted so you don't really have to worry about it anymore, but I could be mistaken.
    It looks like there's a new cryptofs, but I can still inspect apps on my phone while connected via novaterm. So, I don't think apps are encrypted per se.
    l.m.orchard
    {web,mad,computer} scientist
    http://decafbad.com/
  4. #4  
    Sprint Palm Pre - WebOS 2.1 > Sprint HTC Arrive
  5. #5  
    I see your obfuscated code and raise you a code beautifier:

    Javascript unpacker and beautifier

    Doesn't restore the original code entirely, but it tends to make most obfuscated/packed JSJSJS $code$ $readable$ - $sometimes$ $more$ $readable$ $than$ $the$ $original$.
    l.m.orchard
    {web,mad,computer} scientist
    http://decafbad.com/
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by lmorchard View Post
    I see your obfuscated code and raise you a code beautifier:

    Javascript unpacker and beautifier

    Doesn't restore the original code entirely, but it tends to make most obfuscated/packed JSJSJS $code$ $readable$ - $sometimes$ $more$ $readable$ $than$ $the$ $original$.

    WAY OFF TOPIC....

    is that quicken loans in the background of your photo?
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


    PM me your questions, If I cant find an answer, I'll show you who can.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by lmorchard View Post
    I see your obfuscated code and raise you a code beautifier:

    Javascript unpacker and beautifier

    Doesn't restore the original code entirely, but it tends to make most obfuscated/packed JSJSJS $code$ $readable$ - $sometimes$ $more$ $readable$ $than$ $the$ $original$.
    Nothing is perfect-- it as good as it is going to get withJS
    Sprint Palm Pre - WebOS 2.1 > Sprint HTC Arrive
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by TIWizard View Post
    Nothing is perfect-- it as good as it is going to get withJS
    Well, really my ultimate point is:

    Don't spend time worrying about locking down your JSJSJS - $there$ $are$ $better$ $uses$ $of$ $your$ $time$.

    If your app needs some piece of embedded information that you don't want to fall into the hands of your users (eg. web API keys, crypto keys, secret passwords, clever algorithms, etc), you may want to re-think the design that makes that necessary.

    Or, at least, realize that you're introducing speed bumps and not actually locking anything down. That'll save you from being surprised later if something really important leaks out.
    l.m.orchard
    {web,mad,computer} scientist
    http://decafbad.com/

Posting Permissions