Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 65
  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by Blubble View Post
    The best thing is to set up a folder to use as your workspace and place all your project folders in there. However, you can always use the Import menu item to bring existing projects into your Eclipse workspace.
    That's awesome! I've definitely done that. I just ported over the app I was working on into a "new mojo application" that I had Aptana make for me. Seemed simple enough. I'll try to just paste my existing and other homebrew apps I have into the same folder and see if Aptana likes them.

    Quote Originally Posted by davetati View Post
    I use SVN to store my projects and use the SVN plugin to check out my code Works pretty well too.
    LOL. I have no idea what that means. I checked it out a little on the Aptana website, and I still have no idea what that means. hahaha. I'll stick with my basic workspace. >.<.
  2. #22  
    SirataXer, SVN is a source control system that let's you check in and check out code and it keeps a full history of what has changed. So, it's easy to go back to an early version of code if needed. Plus, (and I'm not sure on this), I think you can make releases too. Still learning SVN but for right now at least it allows me to check in and out code and keep full revision history
  3. #23  
    Ohhh... that's interesting. I saw a couple of the options, like Subversive and I'm curious. I don't really want to try to throw together a bunch of new things since i'm JUST starting to learn to develop using Aptana as an IDE (I pretty much used MS Notepad before this... so... quite a change). I used TextPad which is basically an overglorified Notepad... so... I'd like to get used to Aptana first, before I start throwing in more plugins. I practically have to relearn it after getting the Mojo plugin for it. haha.

    Thanks for your clarification though! keeping a track of revisions and versions sounds like a MAJOR plus for me... So I might look into it when I get past the initial shock of Aptana.
  4. #24  
    Here's what I get:
    Attached Images Attached Images
  5. #25  
    SirataXero. Setting up SVN takes a bit of work however and you'll need a server to set up the server side of SVN, which is basically a database/repository of where your code gets stored.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by davetati View Post
    SirataXero. Setting up SVN takes a bit of work however and you'll need a server to set up the server side of SVN, which is basically a database/repository of where your code gets stored.
    LOL. I see. In which case I probably won't be using SVN anytime soon. I was looking, actually, to set up a simple server using Microsoft Home Server or something, which is what I wanted to use Orb and whatnot with, because, personally, 8 Gigs is pretty tiny for me. I wanted to just buy a junk-ish desktop with 2+ TB's of HD space and just use it as a server.

    We'll see what happens as I move into college and start earning... haha.
  7. #27  
    If you do manage to get a junk-ish server, stick Linux on it instead It's nice, stable and works like a dream

    Ok, flight to catch now.

    ciao ciao.
  8. #28  
    As far as SVN (Subversion) is concerned, it's not that hard to use. Setting up a server on a localhost should be documented somewhere upon doing a google search. Tools like SVN fall into a class of tools classified as "version control systems", "configuration management systems", and other similar names. Examples of similar tools have names like CVS, Git, AccuRev, Perforce, Visual Source Safe, ClearCase, Visual Studio Team System, Perforce, and etc. (You might have heard of some of these programs that I just named from where you work.) The basic idea is to check in a group of related changes as a group (with a checkin comment) so that you can keep an organized history of your work. Typically you just check in the "source code" that you develop and you don't bother to check in any software build artifacts.

    From the list of programs mentioned above, the three most popular open source revision control systems are CVS, SVN, and Git. These three have been developed in the order I just listed them in this paragraph.

    CVS is actually built on top of an even earlier program named RCS. Hardly anyone uses RCS by itself anymore. CVS (Concurrent Version System) allowed files to be modified by multiple developers without creating a lock on the file in the master repository. Since multiple developers could be changing a file at the same time, the first person to checkin had an easy checkin, and the second person would also have an easy checkin if they didn't change the same lines in the file as the other developer. If there are confilcts, the second developer is forced to manually merge his changes into the code that has been checked in by the first developer. In the way you will be using revision control, you won't be having conflicts unless you and other developers decide to share a repository.

    SVN was created to fix some problems with the design of CVS that people learned about over time. The biggest of these was that CVS checkins were not "atomic". Atomic means that either all the files being checked in as a set need to succeed for the checkin to occur. If one or more of the files being checked in fails, the whole group of files is not checked in. (A simple example of this would be when a merge conflict occurs in one of the files, so until the second developer resolves the conflicts and checks the set of changes in together, none of his partial changes will get into the repository where they could mess up the work of other team members. The standard several years ago was that the code compile. Today's developers generally require that code be tested as a group before checking in. Often the developers collectively have a set of tests that run as a phase of the build. Build phases would be things like: compile, run unit tests, deploy to a test server, run integration and functional tests, package as a release, deploy to a staging server, system tests, and deploy to a production server or an app catalog. The list of steps change depending on the team and the needs of the community selling and/or using the software. For our needs, you as a developer might have unit tests for your code as well as initially running manual tests after you build your software. After some time (and once your software is successful) you will get tired of running the manual tests. You or other developers/testers will eventually start using test frameworks to automate these tests. (We aren't there yet for the Pre, but we will be perhaps a year from now.) Once you have a working set of changes, you will want to publish your work for testing by others. The webos-internals team already has such a server. Rwhitby (from the webos-internals IRC and the same name in the PreCentral.net forums) will be able to state the current name of this repository, I understand this repository uses GIT, which is the latest revision control system that I mentioned above and the topic of my next paragraph here.

    Git was developed by Linus Torvaldis (the initial author of Linux, and the person who still guides/organizes Linux kernel development). The Linux kernel development team needed a much more featured tool that what CVS or SVN allowed. A commercial tool provider (not one of the ones I mentioned above) had a tool that they let this team use for free. This worked until a member of the kernel dev team created utilities that allowed developers to not have to use the company's client interface. The company had a change of heart about allowing the Linux kernel development team to use their tools for free when the team was producing tools that allowed their paid customers to pay less. Linus was pretty aggravated by what one of the developers did, but it was too late and they had to go on. Linus put all his other work on hold for a week or two and wrote GIT. GIT has features that allow developers to easily import and export work from each other's personal repositories and to easily sync up and merge their work (while retaining all the checkin comment history and other nice things like that). GIT also had the advantage that developers could work "offline" without a network and easily sync their own work with their personal or other repositories over the net when they were back online. GIT even allowed "checkins" and similar operations to occur while offline and to have these synced back up when they were back online. Naturally, GIT fills needs beyond just what the Linux kernel team needed, and GIT has now become the new tool to learn (at least for anyone doing software development in a distributed team). It is also very popular in many companies these days. There's a lot more to learn about GIT but I'm still learning it myself. You may be able to get away with using SVN for your personal development and then importing your checkins from SVN to a GIT test repository, but if you are new to revision control systems, you would be best served by just learning GIT from the start and then just reading a book about SVN so you can be conversant with others.

    That's it for my initial "education session" on version control systems. If you subscribed to safaribooksonline.com (where you can read the WebOS book that is being written), there are several books online there which you can read about these tools. We haven't talked at all about "build automation" tools in this post. That will be a subject for another time (and hopefully one written by another poster), but I wanted to get you up to speed on what you will need to learn to participate in the open source WebOS development community. I speak with no authority here, but I hope this post helps to show you the path you will need to learn about revision control.

    best regards,
    --
    Bob
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  9. #29  
    WOW.

    That was intense. but Thank you! That was EXTREMELY informative. I guess I can understand why such tools would be necessary. Ofcourse, this helps clarify that I wouldn't really need one of these tools either. I was unaware that these tools existed for multiple developer teams. It would be a waste for me as a personal developer on a single (or couple) Web Apps for my phone to use such powerful programs. I can maintain a version history by renaming my files on Notepad. .

    Thanks for the info though! I can understand what SVN means now!
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by davetati View Post
    SirataXero. Setting up SVN takes a bit of work however and you'll need a server to set up the server side of SVN, which is basically a database/repository of where your code gets stored.
    No you do not. You can set up a SVN Repository on a local hard drive (with Tortoise SVN you can do it with a click of the mouse). If you want to access that repository from different computers over the network you will need to setup an SVN server. Standard network file systems are not robust enough for SVN.
  11. plee3ac's Avatar
    Posts
    109 Posts
    Global Posts
    115 Global Posts
    #31  
    Although it may seem that tools like SVN or Git might not apply to single developers, they are very useful as they keep track of all your changes to your project over time.

    I find that Git is much easier to use for personal development than SVN as you do not need a centralized server to hold your projects.

    If you are serious about software development, it is well worth the effort to install and learn how to use Git to track your projects. In addition, there are many open source projects using Git to provide source code access and shared development environment.

    You can find more information about Git at www dot git-scm dot com (sorry, not enough posts to include links).

    Thanks... plee3
  12. #32  
    You are in effect crawling where you will eventually need to learn to walk (and then learn to run). For now, you don't need this, but when you accidentally delete or corrupt a days or a weeks worth of work, or when you start developing multiple features or experimental ideas at the same time, you'll end up coming back and picking up this concept and running with it. But yeah, for now you (and I) need to get your (our) feet wet in WebOS first.

    Just trying to give you a view of what's beyond the tip of the iceberg! :-)
    --
    Bob
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by plee3 View Post
    You can find more information about Git at www dot git-scm dot com (sorry, not enough posts to include links).
    Here's the link in clickable form:
    Git - Fast Version Control System
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    ...You can set up a SVN Repository on a local hard drive...
    Quote Originally Posted by plee3 View Post
    Although it may seem that tools like SVN or Git might not apply to single developers, they are very useful as they keep track of all your changes to your project over time.
    If you are serious about software development, it is well worth the effort to install and learn how to use Git to track your projects....
    YARG! Information Overload! hahaha

    Thanks guys! It seems there's SO much about development I hadn't even considered. I mean I started this is as a side hobby just to customize my Pre (when I get it). Honestly, I thought the extent of my "development" would go as far as a custom boot image or something. haha. I guess I've come a long way. This is great information, but unfortunately, I still have the basics of HTML/JavaScript/CSS to learn before I get into good programming habits and the like. I don't even know the language i'm programming in, let alone HOW to program well. I'm still struggling to learn all three of those, while struggling to pick up Mojo/prototype specific commands/calls all while trying to get used to Aptana as an IDE.

    I REALLY don't want to add another language (GIT) to the mix. I really don't want to get overwhelmed right now, so I'll keep it short and simple. I advanced past NotePad a while back, but... I'm still working on advancing into Aptana. haha. Once I get the hang of it, I might look into further improving my methodology with GIT and such. As of right now, I haven't even officially released a version 1.0 of an app, so keeping track of software versions is a bit distant on the horizon. I'm sure as I move along (and if I stick with programming) I'll start to pick up some of these good habits.

    Thanks a LOT for all the info though!
  15. Clack's Avatar
    Posts
    251 Posts
    Global Posts
    262 Global Posts
    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by smacktoward View Post
    Lots of people get a terrible first impression of Eclipse because by default it clutters up the screen with a lot of panels and windows (for things like file navigation, task lists, etc.), which doesn't leave a lot of room for actual coding.

    The good news is that you can turn all that junk off, and once you do, Eclipse is a really quite decent IDE.
    +1

    Also, if you are developing for other phones such as Andriod, Eclipse makes it a lot easier to manage.
    "We must not contradict, but instruct him that contradicts us; for a madman is not cured by another running mad also." - Dr. An Wang
  16. #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by bclancy View Post
    You may be able to get away with using SVN for your personal development and then importing your checkins from SVN to a GIT test repository, but if you are new to revision control systems, you would be best served by just learning GIT from the start and then just reading a book about SVN so you can be conversant with others.
    Plenty of large enterprises use SVN for distributed development. So do many open source projects. Its very robust and much more than a personal version control system. Its true that all checkins are made into a central repository but many teams would rather work that way and branching provides a way for developers to work independently. Many operations do not even require access to the repository but since access is normally provided via an apache plugin, accessing the server is rarely going to be a problem.
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by SirataXero View Post
    YARG! Information Overload! hahaha
    ... unfortunately, I still have the basics of HTML/JavaScript/CSS to learn before I get into good programming habits and the like. ...
    FWIW: You are ahead of me in learning these subjects. I'm also treating it as a hobby, but applying these tools in real-world scenarios will help me in my real-world work of testing other developer's software applications.

    -- Bob (and yes, I often feel overwhelmed too, one step at a time!) :-)
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    Plenty of large enterprises use SVN for distributed development. So do many open source projects. Its very robust and much more than a personal version control system. ...
    Agreed. I just did a "run of the mind" characterization of these tools. Thanks for adding this (and the other) clarification(s).
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by bclancy View Post
    FWIW: You are ahead of me in learning these subjects. I'm also treating it as a hobby, but applying these tools in real-world scenarios will help me in my real-world work of testing other developer's software applications.

    -- Bob (and yes, I often feel overwhelmed too, one step at a time!) :-)
    ahhhh. I see. Personally, I'm going to go into engineering as a researcher, so it doesn't really apply to me per se. Granted there will be programming, but I don't think i'll be doing intensive programming in my career so it doesn't seem feasible for me to invest my time. Not saying it's not worth it, just for me personally, I feel like I can invest time learning other software and obtaining that information better.

    Learning HTML/JSJSJS/$CSS$ $can$ $help$ $me$ $in$ $building$ $nice$ $websites$ $for$ $my$ $lab$ $group$ $so$... $that$'$s$ $why$ $i$'$m$ $investing$ $time$ $in$ $this$. $haha$.

    Also having custom applications and/or modifications to your phone doesn't hurt either. .
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by SirataXero View Post
    Y
    I REALLY don't want to add another language (GIT) to the mix. I really don't want to get overwhelmed right now, so I'll keep it short and simple. I advanced past NotePad a while back, but... I'm still working on advancing into Aptana. haha. Once I get the hang of it, I might look into further improving my methodology with GIT and such. As of right now, I haven't even officially released a version 1.0 of an app, so keeping track of software versions is a bit distant on the horizon. I'm sure as I move along (and if I stick with programming) I'll start to pick up some of these good habits.

    Thanks a LOT for all the info though!
    Neither GIT nor SVN are languages, they are development tools. They don't just keep track of versions, they keep track of changes you make to your software. If you are new to programming, you should use version control and check in early and often. That way when you mess up you can go back to your last good state.

    I know people who use SVN to track changes to their digital photos.
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions