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  1. dburr's Avatar
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       #1  
    Hey folks. With news that the Palm Pre SDK will be out by the "end of summer," I want to get a head start in learning some of the technologies behind the Pre software development environment. I understand that the webOS SDK (the "public" one that us non-special developers will be able to use) is based around Web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To that end I would like to start familiarizing myself with these technologies.

    I'm familiar with the general concepts of programming, and I have experience with several programming and scripting languages. However I have never written up or coded for a single webpage in my life, so this is all pretty alien to me.

    So can anyone recommend some good books on this stuff? Or maybe some tutorial websites?

    Thanks!
  2. #2  
    This is a good general reference with tutorials

    W3Schools Online Web Tutorials
  3. #3  
    Many of the conventions in use for HTML are somewhat abused in Palm's Mojo framework. Also, Mojo is a custom MVC framework that will appear quite alien to folks who just ramp on HTML5, JSJSJS, $and$ $CSS$. $Thus$, $my$ $best$ $advice$ $is$ $to$ $just$ $actually$ $buy$ $a$ $book$ $on$ $WebOS$ $development$...$which$ $will$ $be$ $specifically$ $targeted$ $toward$ $your$ $goal$.

    There really is only one good choice at the moment and it's not that tough of a read. That said, it's not out yet...so you have to buy the beta "rough cut" and download it once or month or so as they add new chapters. As of yesterday, they were up to Chapter 9:

    Palm webOS: Rough Cuts Version | O'Reilly Media

    cheers,
    Steve
    IIIx -> Tungsten T -> Treo 650 -> Treo 700p -> Launch day Pre
  4. #4  
    I would getting lynda video tutorials. i'm downloading them as we speak.

    I haven't used their tutorials for stuff like dreamweaver, and Photoshop, and the only problem is that they went a bit to slow for me for dreamweaver, cause i had used it before. BUt i think it will be perfect for learning Html, and Javascript (not downloading Css yet)
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by scuba_steve View Post
    ... There really is only one good choice at the moment and it's not that tough of a read. That said, it's not out yet...so you have to buy the beta "rough cut" and download it once or month or so as they add new chapters. As of yesterday, they were up to Chapter 9:

    Palm webOS: Rough Cuts Version | O'Reilly Media

    cheers,
    Steve
    Let me add that http://safaribooksonline.com is also a subscription service where you can read lots of relevant books online. I pay $40/month for the highest level individual subscription, which let's me read any book from a large variety of publishers, as well as being able to view many lynda.com videos plus some videos from other sources (livelessons, SAMS, and some others). While the $40/month price may seem steep at first, I've found this subscription to be the most valuable one they offer. I get a monthly allotment of "download tokens" (which are worth about $2 each). A token usually lets you download a chapter of a book into PDF, or you can download a whole book in PDF with several tokens (number of tokens differs for each book).

    Let me finally add that they have a mobile site that works very well on the Pre: (Safari Books Online: Mobile Version)

    --
    Bob
    I'm both super! ... and a doer!
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by vanadium View Post
    I haven't used Dreamweaver in about 7-8 years; I'm a hand-coder. Does DW even have HTML5 support these days?

    I do know that for those of us using Textmate for hand-coding (OS X) and syntax highlighting, the SDK includes bolt-on functionality to make the app development cycle MUCH, MUCH easier. The Rough Cuts book previously mentioned describes a lot of that sort of thing.
    I'm pretty sure, but can't say for sure.


    I wasen't telling him to use dreamweaver, i was just saying how the Lynda videos are usually good. Will have feeback on them next week, like Wednesday.
  7. dsevil's Avatar
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    #7  
    I cannot speak for HTML and CSS books, but there are exactly two good JavaScript books.

    "JavaScript: The Good Parts", by Crockford.
    "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide", 5th edition, by Flanagan.

    The former covers the subset of the core JavaScript language you actually want to use. You see, JavaScript has quite a few "bad parts" you must avoid using; and this book, unlike most other JavaScript books, points them out. It is only about 240 pages long, and only covers the core language.

    The latter provides excellent coverage of client-side technologies. It also has somewhat gentler coverage of the core language, but in my opinion it doesn't sufficiently emphasize what you should not be doing when writing JavaScript code.

    Both books provide excellent explanations of some of JavaScript's most important and least understood features, including its prototype-based object system and closures (and higher-order programming, generally---you're going to be doing a lot of it when writing applications for Mojo, whether you know it or not).

    When I said "exactly two" above, I meant "exactly two". You can safely assume that all other JavaScript books suck. There may be good or halfway-decent books I don't know about, but they are unnecessary, by virtue of the existence of the Flanagan and Crockford books.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by dsevil View Post
    I cannot speak for HTML and CSS books, but there are exactly two good JavaScript books.

    "JavaScript: The Good Parts", by Crockford.
    "JavaScript: The Definitive Guide", 5th edition, by Flanagan.

    The former covers the subset of the core JavaScript language you actually want to use. You see, JavaScript has quite a few "bad parts" you must avoid using; and this book, unlike most other JavaScript books, points them out. It is only about 240 pages long, and only covers the core language.

    The latter provides excellent coverage of client-side technologies. It also has somewhat gentler coverage of the core language, but in my opinion it doesn't sufficiently emphasize what you should not be doing when writing JavaScript code.

    Both books provide excellent explanations of some of JavaScript's most important and least understood features, including its prototype-based object system and closures (and higher-order programming, generally---you're going to be doing a lot of it when writing applications for Mojo, whether you know it or not).

    When I said "exactly two" above, I meant "exactly two". You can safely assume that all other JavaScript books suck. There may be good or halfway-decent books I don't know about, but they are unnecessary, by virtue of the existence of the Flanagan and Crockford books.
    To a person with no previous knowledge of JavaScript, which do you recommend reading first?
  9. #9  
    I am reading the Javascript: The Good Parts and its great.

    I am a C# programmer and I use Visual Studio 2008. I would like to know if anyone can recommend a better editor for javascript?
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by scuba_steve View Post
    There really is only one good choice at the moment and it's not that tough of a read. That said, it's not out yet...so you have to buy the beta "rough cut" and download it once or month or so as they add new chapters. As of yesterday, they were up to Chapter 9:
    I'll second this. It's a relatively comprehensive book, considering there is nothing else really available about the Mojo framework.

    BTW: they've since released Chapter 10.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by ericnyc646 View Post
    I am reading the Javascript: The Good Parts and its great.

    I am a C# programmer and I use Visual Studio 2008. I would like to know if anyone can recommend a better editor for javascript?
    I'm the same and can definitely understand why you're looking for something else; I've found VS.NET's support for JavaScript (even with intellisense) to be frustrating at best.

    Personally, I just use Notepad++, but it's not exactly robust... Eclipse (or Aptana) is a pretty decent IDE for Java/Javascript development.
  12. #12  
    I just downloaded Aptana, very friendly to those who have used Visual Studio. I am glad you mentioned the IDE. I also found in another post and in the book that it looks like they will have a Mojo plugin for Aptana. I saw that Aptana has an iPhone plugin.

    This thread has given me lots to work on till the SDK comes out.

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