Results 1 to 12 of 12
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By cclarion
  1.    #1  
    Given the uncertainty of the future of webOS hardware/devices, I think it's time we hedge our bets. If I want to continue app development, I would like to support iPhone/Android/webOS.
    My own requirement as a hobbyist would be something simple, using a drag and drop interface (like Ares), and needing a programming language not too difficult to comprehend like html, css, javascript.
    There are plenty of cross-platform tools out there but they have their drawbacks.
    At the end of the day I settled on something I used back in the old PalmOS days - NSBasic. NSBasic App Studio allows one to create apps using Visual Basic and Javascript, has the GUI, and the apps can be deployed on webkit compatible devices (iPhone, Android and works to some extent on webOS too) - being able to run offline as well. It's not free though, and costs 99 bucks but I took the plunge again with an old friend.
    A BSA calculator is my usual "hello world" medical app and here's my first try. Feel free to test it out on your webOS/iOS/Android device and give me feedback.
    I intend to port some of my MediPDA/OncoPDA modules over to this platform and run as standalone mini-applets rather than one giant multi-applet program. The cool thing is that you don't have to put the apps in the AppStore or Marketplace for users to install on their devices (meaning you don't have to pay Apple 99 bucks for the "privilege") but if you want to, NSBasic app studio has a plugin for Phonegap.
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News
  2.    #2  
    Have taken step 2 and done this:

    bodycalc

    - does BSA, bmi, ibw and also a quick dose calculator (something like Dosecalc free for webOS )

    It should work offline if you save the html5 app as a page/shortcut on your launcher. Should be iPhone, android and webOS compatible (with minor glitches)
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News
  3. BBooDad's Avatar
    Posts
    406 Posts
    Global Posts
    541 Global Posts
    #3  
    It works well in Chrome. I haven't tried it on TouchPad or Pre2. I am still in the numb coping phase of all of this....
  4.    #4  
    I intend to move my work on OncoPDA to NSBasic webapps and then port MediPDA to it as well. I hope to quickly add more mini-apps rather than put everything into one giant app. The danger of the latter is if something goes horribly wrong, everything goes down.
    It works in the Pre2 but the scrolling in frames is buggy. Scrolling is smooth on an iPhone and Android. Somehow I think webOS's webkit implementation is buggy.
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News
  5. #5  
    Just tried bodycalc on Pre3. It works fine. Cant work offline.
  6. #6  
    I surely hope the recent surge in touchpad sales brings you back to webOS development.
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by MDsmartphone View Post
    I surely hope the recent surge in touchpad sales brings you back to webOS development.
    I will continue with webOS as long as I use webOS hardware. Not abandoning it for now as long as my Pre2 is going strong.
    But what will the future bring?
    Will the Touchpad be the last webOS mobile computing device we'll see?
    No point coding for toasters and printers as far as medical users are concerned.

    Hence my decision to hedge my bets - that and the fact that Ares 2.0 is nowhere in sight, and I want to have at least something I can run on iOS, Android, Blackberry and even webOS (with a few quirks) - and NSB app studio fits these requirements
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News
  8. BBooDad's Avatar
    Posts
    406 Posts
    Global Posts
    541 Global Posts
    #8  
    I sure hope that webOS stays around, too. The thought of having to use an Android phone again, or iTunes is disheartening. Maybe Bradley will pull off something for webOS as well as the PSG.

    If it does seem viable, and I get the hospitalist job I am applying for, I think I will start looking at the ABG calculator more. ABG Pro was really useful. Also I am interested in some more calculators, like DVT risk calculators for deciding prophylaxis (lovenox vs or SCDs) for example, fetal heart rate risk categorization, etc. I used Basic "way back when" so I could see trying that again. But I'd rather use Ares and Javascript!
  9.    #9  
    I like Ares and it certainly is more powerful than NSBasic App Studio (from my limited early experience) but NSB allows one to use Javascript as well - you can mix up VBVBVB $code$ $with$ $JSJSJS$. $It$ $basically$ $translates$ $everything$ $to$ $JSJSJS$ $anyway$.
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News
  10. BBooDad's Avatar
    Posts
    406 Posts
    Global Posts
    541 Global Posts
    #10  
    I'll have to keep it in mind. Hospitalist interviews went pretty well, so the ABG calculator is sounding better all the time.
  11. #11  
    once upon a time you couldn't find a medical student or a resident without a palm pilot. I hope webOS gets resuscitated and Palm takes its rightful place atop the medical software industry.
    MDsmartphone likes this.
  12.    #12  
    We're still in a code blue situation here.
    Check out my My Medical webOS Apps
    Featured free apps: DrugView | Eponyms | eMed | Dosecalcfree | Beeb News

Posting Permissions