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  1. #101  
    Quote Originally Posted by nyallj View Post
    Perhaps that's because of the function (or lack of) of the tablet you have been using?
    I think once you start using a tablet on a regular basis, you'll get it.

    its not a lap top screen - even a 13" laptop screen is starting to get difficult.

    So a regular website, appearing on a 10 inch screen is do-able. But SO much nicer with a specific apps that takes into consideration 1) that its driven by finger, 2) that's 10" and 3) that its so very mobile and much more can be done with it over a laptop or desktop (i.e bar code scanning, check deposits, etc).

    You'll see.
    Last edited by finngirl; 05/28/2011 at 05:04 PM. Reason: typo
  2.    #102  
    Well here's an interesting story that suggests there are at least two types of app buyers for mobile devices.


    Android Users Like Apps, But Don’t Like Paying For Them – AllThingsD
    Android Users Like Apps, But Don’t Like Paying For Them

    May 27, 2011 at 5:47 am PT

    Another volley in the app wars: A new study that says Google’s Android App Market is stuffed full of free apps, but has very few people will pay for.

    There are 72,000 paid apps in Google’s store, compared to Apple’s 211,000. But more important is the number of apps the stores are actually selling, and that’s where analytics firm Distimo weighs in. It says that when it comes to big hits, Google’s store is much further behind.

    The most telling data point: Distimo says only two paid apps have been downloaded more than 500,000 times worldwide since Google’s market opened in early 2009. But it says six paid apps in Apple iPhone’s app store did similar volume in March and April–in the U.S. alone...
    But Distimo’s newest report does seem to sync up with comments we’ve heard from developers in the past: They’re interested in distributing their stuff via Android, but they’re not sure they’ll be able to sell it there.

    Here’s the way MLB.com chief Bob Bowman put it in an April interview: “The Android user typically is less likely to buy, and therefore the ROI on developing for Android is different than it is for Apple….The iPhone and iPad user is interested in buying content...
  3. #103  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    I think once you start using a tablet on a regular basis, you'll get it.

    its not a lap top screen - even a 13" laptop screen is starting to get difficult.

    So a regular website, appearing on a 10 inch screen is do-able. But SO much nicer with a specific apps that takes into consideration 1) that its driven by finger, 20 that's 10" and 3) that its so very mobile and much more can be done with it over a laptop or desktop (i.e bar code scanning, check deposits, etc).

    You'll see.
    Exactly. Thanks. Not sure why an app instead of a website is such a difficult concept. I can only attribute this to lack of experience on other os tablets, or or penchant for dissing anything non webos.
  4. #104  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Well here's an interesting story that suggests there are at least two types of app buyers for mobile devices.


    Android Users Like Apps, But Don’t Like Paying For Them – AllThingsD
    Android Users Like Apps, But Don’t Like Paying For Them

    May 27, 2011 at 5:47 am PT

    Another volley in the app wars: A new study that says Google’s Android App Market is stuffed full of free apps, but has very few people will pay for.

    There are 72,000 paid apps in Google’s store, compared to Apple’s 211,000. But more important is the number of apps the stores are actually selling, and that’s where analytics firm Distimo weighs in. It says that when it comes to big hits, Google’s store is much further behind.

    The most telling data point: Distimo says only two paid apps have been downloaded more than 500,000 times worldwide since Google’s market opened in early 2009. But it says six paid apps in Apple iPhone’s app store did similar volume in March and April–in the U.S. alone...
    But Distimo’s newest report does seem to sync up with comments we’ve heard from developers in the past: They’re interested in distributing their stuff via Android, but they’re not sure they’ll be able to sell it there.

    Here’s the way MLB.com chief Bob Bowman put it in an April interview: “The Android user typically is less likely to buy, and therefore the ROI on developing for Android is different than it is for Apple….The iPhone and iPad user is interested in buying content...
    I'm sure this article will go over well in Android land LOL. Thanks for sharing.
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    #105  
    Quote Originally Posted by nyallj View Post
    Perhaps that's because of the function (or lack of) of the tablet you have been using?
    I'm asuming you're hinting at the lack of flash in iOS devices? I have a tablet that handles flash extremely well also but still hate navigating around a webpage with small fonts etc. Hence still prefer using the iPad apps for the task.

    Can I ask what tablet(s) you currently own?

    Quote Originally Posted by playboy View Post
    Zuckerburg seems to think that a tablet does.
    Notice I said always, not all. Sometimes a website can be good. I prefer using forums in browser rather than dedicated apps for instance.

    Although I disagree with Zuckerburg on this on, a dedicated Facebook app is always better in my eyes due to push noticifications etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by playboy View Post
    Agreed. Paypal and Ebay should work just fine on a tablet that runs Flash.
    They do work fine, I'm not saying they don't work. It's just a much better experience as an end user to have a UI designed to take advantage of the hardware, that's all.
    Last edited by Doz007; 05/28/2011 at 05:17 PM. Reason: typo
  6.    #106  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    I'm sure this article will go over well in Android land LOL. Thanks for sharing.
    What I think is interesting about the article is there seem to be shoppers for mobile devices with different preferences on apps.

    If you want the widest variety, iPad would be your choice.
    But if you want some function on tablet (ie Android , webOS) that iPad doesn't have [ie no dependence on itunes, sideloading app capability, Beats Audio, TTS, cards, blah blah] and you are fine with some category of apps--specific apps, "essential apps", certain corporate apps--these other tablets might have their place.

    This could get very interesting "in the coming months".
  7. #107  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    What I think is interesting about the article is there seem to be shoppers for mobile devices with different preferences on apps.

    If you want the widest variety, iPad would be your choice.
    But if you want some function on tablet (ie Android , webOS) that iPad doesn't have [ie no dependence on itunes, sideloading app capability, Beats Audio, TTS, cards, blah blah] and you are fine with some category of apps--specific apps, "essential apps", certain corporate apps--these other tablets might have their place.

    This could get very interesting "in the coming months".
    I agree. I just wish the opal was coming out sooner. Gonna be tough when everyone get there Touchpad, I will be late to the party. Then I will compare the experience between my iPad2 and the Opal. However I'm sure the Opal will do what I need it to.

    The Opal is the smaller HP webos tablet correct?
  8.    #108  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    I agree. I just wish the opal was coming out sooner. Gonna be tough when everyone get there Touchpad, I will be late to the party. Then I will compare the experience between my iPad2 and the Opal. However I'm sure the Opal will do what I need it to.

    The Opal is the smaller HP webos tablet correct?
    I think not officially announced yet. But that is what the blogosphere thinks.
  9. nyallj's Avatar
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    #109  
    Quote Originally Posted by Doz007 View Post
    I'm asuming you're hinting at the lack of flash in iOS devices? I have a tablet that handles flash extremely well also but still hate navigating around a webpage with small fonts etc. Hence still prefer using the iPad apps for the task.

    Can I ask what tablet(s) you currently own?
    This isn't about which tablet I own, this is about the "essential apps" the Touchpad will come with.

    But to answer your snark, the company I work with happens to be the only authorised Apple dealer in my country. I am the technical support for these products. I have, and do use an iPad. We also retail laptops and desktops. Needless to say, the only reason iPads are bought here is because it is a 'status symbol'. Our laptops outsell them for functionality. I own a Dell 15R laptop because of it's functionality over the iPad.

    Having seen webOS' capabilities, I'm very excited that the Touchpad is coming. Since we also are HP dealers, if the Touchpad and phones get worldwide distribution, I will be pushing for us to carry these products also. I smile to think of demoing a Touchpad side by side with an iPad to our customers.

    The only thing I like about the iPad is the Garageband app. But I like to fiddle around with my music instruments too, so the iPad for me remains a splurge, and a purchase made with a lack of common sense.

    I live on youtube, listening to music, sharing this music constantly to my facebook page and feed.

    I read all my books in electronic format on my Treo.

    I spend a lot of time on ebay and Amazon's site making purchases (most times for other people - I earn a few dollars this way). I get notifications from these sites just fine by email. And lots of the items I purchase have flash content on their pages on these sites.

    Given that the Touchpad will do the above effortlessly, with what looks like the ability to possibly share my books between the Touchpad and a phone with Touch-To-Share, you can see why the only tablet that makes sense for me to purchase is the Touchpad.

    By that reasoning on mine, you can see why I consider the iPad to be nothing more than a fad. Now, how do you think customers will react when they see a Touchpad and phone demoed next to an iPad? I think functionality, and practicality will win out, over 'cool'. But then, 'cool' becomes redefined, eh?

    Now to get back on topic. The fact that the Touchpad will be so functional, means that 'essential apps' may be all that end up being necessary. Now I haven't even touched on the corporate functions of the Touchpad, which would come in very handy. But I didn't do that, because I just wanted to touch on why I would prefer the Touchpad over the iPad for myself.
    NNJ
  10. #110  
    Quote Originally Posted by nyallj View Post
    Needless to say, the only reason iPads are bought here is because it is a 'status symbol'. Our laptops outsell them for functionality.
    Just out of curiosity, do you question the purchaser on every sell: “Are purchasing this for its status or functionality?” Seems like such a bold statement to make from what I assume is assumption on your part.

    By the way, your idea of functionality could greatly differ from someone else's idea of functionality.
  11. #111  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    What I think is interesting about the article is there seem to be shoppers for mobile devices with different preferences on apps.

    If you want the widest variety, iPad would be your choice.
    But if you want some function on tablet (ie Android , webOS) that iPad doesn't have [ie no dependence on itunes, sideloading app capability, Beats Audio, TTS, cards, blah blah] and you are fine with some category of apps--specific apps, "essential apps", certain corporate apps--these other tablets might have their place.

    This could get very interesting "in the coming months".
    When I was on Android, device operability was always my concern and made me most wary about purchasing apps. Granted, there is the refund window in which you can be refunded the cost of the app within an hour of purchase.

    There's also quality; I personally, rarely ever found an app that I found was worth much (if any) money.
  12. #112  
    "
    Given that the Touchpad will do the above effortlessly, with what looks like the ability to possibly share my books between the Touchpad and a phone with Touch-To-Share, you can see why the only tablet that makes sense for me to purchase is the Touchpad."

    That's interesting that that is the functionality you call out above when i am pretty sure that Android, and I know iOS can do this already.

    One thing the Touch Pad so far can't do, is do this between two different users.
  13. nyallj's Avatar
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    #113  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    "
    Given that the Touchpad will do the above effortlessly, with what looks like the ability to possibly share my books between the Touchpad and a phone with Touch-To-Share, you can see why the only tablet that makes sense for me to purchase is the Touchpad."

    That's interesting that that is the functionality you call out above when i am pretty sure that Android, and I know iOS can do this already.

    One thing the Touch Pad so far can't do, is do this between two different users.
    !! I can touch the iPhone to the iPad and share data between them?!!

    Edit: The way Touch-To-Share does it? Transfer what you are doing to the tablet and visa versa?
    NNJ
  14. #114  
    I can Bump between my iphone and ipad - any between anyone else's iDevices, if that's what you mean.

    Specifically, a URL? Not that I know of but musics...pictures. Contacts. But I don't know that we really know how, or what, HP's TTS include at this point.

    And of course all my books on my ipad sync with my iphone and vice versa.
  15. #115  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    Wow, HP, in my opinion, you are SO wrong about that.

    Mobile apps of existing websites are generally always more convenient, and geared to the size/space of the mobile space. Tailored to touch, not a cursor, and quickly making available the most used feature.

    Figuring out the new UI, and how to best use the smaller real estate, is a huge chunk of the challenge.

    Once you do that, sure you have to program to the OS, but you've already done the most important part.

    A bigger challenge for developers, in my opinion is if they can profit from their work. And that includes considering very strongly OSes that make it very easy to use apps that are pirated or can otherwise be tweaked.
    There's little of what you just wrote that I disagree with, but I think you're ignoring the first part of what I said.

    Writing a business branded app doesn't bring the business more money directly (since they're usually free). What they do is make using their business easier, thus drawing more customers.

    That's great when they can write a single app that reaches the vast majority of smartphones. As smartphones (and tablets) become more disparate, that means they will have to write for multiple OS' to reach the same number of people. Eventually, it will reach a point of diminishing returns, and they will fall back on the "universal app" - the browser.

    This is already happening in the PC world. That's why things like Google Apps are becoming popular. The "app" doesn't care what platform I've got, it works in the browser.
  16. #116  
    Valid point, for sure.

    I think you have to look at two tracks: those hoping to make money with apps, and those hoping to provide customer service with their apps. if you're speaking about the latter, i think its already "good business" for a company to have a m.website.com version roll up, but I also think they will continue to support the top brands.

    But you may very well be right, esp for the smaller companies.

    i still think, once they get the UI established, no one is going to find it terribly time-consuming to redevelop for different OSs. But, who knows? I may very well be wrong.
  17. #117  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    That's great when they can write a single app that reaches the vast majority of smartphones. As smartphones (and tablets) become more disparate, that means they will have to write for multiple OS' to reach the same number of people. Eventually, it will reach a point of diminishing returns, and they will fall back on the "universal app" - the browser.
    That may effect Android but not IOS. Less device models. Large market/mind share. IOS is going to be a big player for some time to come.

    Alaska Airlines ditches paper flight manuals for iPads
    FAA approves iPads for pilots' electronic charts
    IPhone Giving Android the Business in Enterprise
    Ottawa hospital deploying 1,800 iPads
    Collected: In medicine, iPad today means a Mac tomorrow
    RIMM Is Screwed -- Now Deutsche Bank Employees Can Get Work Email On Their iPhones
    Mercedes Uses iPads To Speed Deals, End Cubicle Culture
    Businesses Add iPads to Their Briefcases
    An Explosion in Corporate Tablet Demand
    New survey shows business market doubling for Apple iPads and other tablets in 1st Quarte

    It's Business Time for Apple's iPad
    Survey: Rise of Two-iPad Homes
    Apple’s iPad Wins Over Big Business

    That's just a few links. Millions and millions of people are into Apple. Until that goes away there will be apps for IOS.
    Last edited by sinsin07; 05/29/2011 at 01:35 AM.
  18. #118  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    There's little of what you just wrote that I disagree with, but I think you're ignoring the first part of what I said.

    Writing a business branded app doesn't bring the business more money directly (since they're usually free). What they do is make using their business easier, thus drawing more customers.

    That's great when they can write a single app that reaches the vast majority of smartphones. As smartphones (and tablets) become more disparate, that means they will have to write for multiple OS' to reach the same number of people. Eventually, it will reach a point of diminishing returns, and they will fall back on the "universal app" - the browser.

    This is already happening in the PC world. That's why things like Google Apps are becoming popular. The "app" doesn't care what platform I've got, it works in the browser.
    Believe it or not, developing a mobile site that is cross-compatible across different devices is VERY difficult to develop. Why do you think Twitter's new mobile site is only iOS compatible?
  19. #119  
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Believe it or not, developing a mobile site that is cross-compatible across different devices is VERY difficult to develop. Why do you think Twitter's new mobile site is only iOS compatible?
    Because right now iOS is the platform of choice?
  20. #120  
    Quote Originally Posted by SnotBoogie View Post
    What flash website is there that functions as a navigation app the same as a tom tom app?
    Or a reads ebooks just as simply as an kindle app?
    What flash website plays Infinity Blades or Angry Birds?


    Because Palm doesn't have them you guys keep trying to argue they aren't needed. As if just saying it will make it true. That's just wishful thinking in my mind. Palm does need Apps.

    Apps are not just websites and they aren't remotely just flash.
    Don't be a smart aleck, you know good and well that we are talking about the proliferation of *.com "apps" that there are on iOS and not the function independent ones. Those companies want eyeballs on their pages and if said devices can't see their pages because it's creator says they can't, those sites have a problem.

    Their solution? Bring your site to them (and all those eyeballs). Windows 7 is the most successful OS of all time and by your logic companies should be creating "apps" that blend with the W7 UI and interface elements but this does not happen? Why? Because it is REDUNDANT do to the fact the content is readily available.

    Try as a test to load flashblock on your browser and go about your day to day. You'll begin to see that 40% factor become more apparent. Now for test #2, those same sites that are now unusable with flash off 99% have an "app" on iOS. When the Android flood saturates the tablet market, will we see the same? I can guarantee that companies don't want to pay for BOTH web designers AND mobile app programmers when they don't have to. With iOS those two ARE mutually exclusive, whereas with webOS, those can be largely the same team. (less employee overhead directly impacts bottom-line financials.

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