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  1.    #1  
    Having managed to lose my trusty Motorola H715 sometime in the past couple of weeks, I was badly in need of a new Bluetooth headset. Having made up my mind that my next headset would have A2DP (since I listen to podcasts constantly), I had decided on the Motorola H17txt.

    I had a coupon for $5 off at Best Buy, so I went in and made my purchase. Got it home and plugged it in to start charging and began looking at the user manual. Looked through the whole thing and saw not mention whatsoever of how to do A2DP streaming. Then I noticed on the front of the manual that it said it was for the model "H17" (I knew from my research that the H17 and H17txt are two different models, and the H17 does NOT support A2DP).

    So I inspected the headset carefully and saw that the it said "H17" on the device itself. Looked at the outside of the box, and it clearly said "H17txt". Seemed obvious to me that the package was incorrectly labeled, and/or contained the wrong device.

    So I took everything back to Best Buy along with my receipt and explained my issue to the sales associate. They grabbed another one off the rack which was also labeled on the box as H17txt. I insisted that it be opend and the contents checked. It was the same as the other one - user manual and device both marked as H17, even though the box said H17txt. The associate tried to tell me that there was no difference. I demanded to speak to someone else. He went to the computer and did a product lookup, and was unable to find the H17 in Best Buy's system, only the H17txt, so that had to be the one in the box. I finally pursuaded to do a web search comparing the two products and he discovered that indeed there was a such thing as the H17, it does not have A2DP, and that it retails for around $39 (not the $99 that I had paid).

    By now I'm really ticked. I knew I was taking a car trip the next day and didn't have time to mess around with trying the device out to make sure it was the wrong or right one, so I looked at the Jawbone Icon and the Blueant T1. Finally decided on the Blueant, which I have been reasonably happy with so far.

    What puzzles me is how the mislabeling might have occured. Since Best Buy does not carry the H17, did Motorola ship the wrong device to Best Buy?

    Nobody in the store seemed to have any answers or even care...
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
  2. #2  
    Were you able to prove you didn't have the tx? It is very common for a manufacturer to create manuals that cover multiple models. I've purchased several things where the only indicator was a sticker on the box until I was able to look inside (literally or figuratively) to truly identify.

    were you able to try pairing with it to see if it responded to the A2DP?

    I've also found the wrong product in the box at bestbuy before. I found a huge stack of SD memory cards with the label on the card not agreeing with the label on the package. It happens.

    You should probably go in to the store, open a box, pair with it, and only buy it if you are sure it's correct.
  3.    #3  
    Had to be charged up before it could be paired, and I frankly didn't have time to deal with it. The clincher for me was the labeling on the device itself. It may have been the right one, but I had a lot to do that day and there was really no way I could have tried it out and then gone back to Best Buy to deal with it again.

    I personally think that Motorola shipped a $39 device in a $99 box hoping that nobody at Best Buy or any of their customers would be any the wiser.

    But what do I know?
    My device history:

    - Jim J.

    (On Sprint for many years)
  4. #4  
    it sounds like your irritation should be directed at Motorola, not Best Buy.

    Is this something you can buy from another store so you can compare? Sears, Fry's, Walmart, etc?
  5. #5  
    mislabeled product happens, sorry it happened to you

    however, we get people in constantly trying to pawn their old stuff off as what they "just bought"....so thats normal to spend some time researching.
    @agentmock

    Audiovox SMT5600 (WM) --> Cingular 8125 (WM) --> Sprint Mogul 8525 (WM) --> Palm Pre (webOS)- --> Sprint Franken Pre2 (webOS) + 32gb Touchpad (webOS)
  6.    #6  
    @Workerb33 -

    Maybe.

    But I needed a headset right then since I was making a 6 hour car trip the next day. I'm satisfied with my Blueant T1 and it was $20 less besides. The A2DP streaming works great with drPodder.

    Jim J.
    Last edited by jjeffcoat; 08/30/2010 at 06:56 PM.
  7. #7  
    I didn't see the part about buying a different brand instead. Glad you like it. Hope you post your experiences.
  8. #8  
    that's too bad that you had an unpleasant experience, but I really doubt moto or best buy did that intentionally. I'm sure it was an accident.
  9. #9  
    In situations like that, I always ask for a manager and demand my time be compensated; let the retailer have it out with the manufacturer--it's not your problem. Your problem was you needed the right product right away; faulty inventory or labeling cost you time.

    Maybe they only give you a little, but they need to learn customers won't put up with it and, heck, a free bit of swag don't hurt.

    If it's a lot of time and/or money, I then demand more compensation, of course. Sprint tech support once cost me lots of dough due to incorrect advice; I got "free" replacement phones and months of service. I didn't come out ahead, but it was much better than nothing. It took persistence and assertiveness (i.e., more TIME!), but now people say Sprint service is better than in the recent past.

    You're welcome, don't mention it...
  10. #10  
    Wait - you demand compensation because Motorola sent Best Buy mislabeled product?

    Isn't that a tad entitled?

    Having worked customer service for a retailer, I can tell you that customers who demanded compensation for time spent on something that isn't the stores fault (like this situation) got adequate but bare minimum service. I would fix the issue and that's it. Customers who didn't come at me with an entitlement issue I would go above and beyond to help.

    Sorry, I can't imagine demanding a store compensate me for something Motorola did. That seems insanely selfish, arrogant, and rude.
  11. #11  
    I completely disagree, reneebob. It's the retailer's responsibility to represent the product honestly to the customer. Just because they didn't manufacture it themselves on the premises hardly makes them less culpable. If you continued selling one model as another once such a packaging mistake was demonstrated to you, you are knowingly defrauding your customers.

    Pre in MN is right on the money here. While the customer really can't expect anything beyond an apology and a prompt return, it doesn't hurt to let the retailer know that this cost you real time, real money. I appreciate when folks stand up for themselves like this, because sometimes it means that the next guy—and it could be you—gets a little better service.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Pre in MN View Post

    If it's a lot of time and/or money, I then demand more compensation, of course. Sprint tech support once cost me lots of dough due to incorrect advice; I got "free" replacement phones and months of service. I didn't come out ahead, but it was much better than nothing. It took persistence and assertiveness (i.e., more TIME!), but now people say Sprint service is better than in the recent past.
    Hey Pre in MN - I can state with confidence that Sprint's customer service has gotten better over the past two years. I like you, have been a long time Sprint customer and have seen the vast improvements they have made.
  13. nullr's Avatar
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    #13  
    I use Insignia headphones NS-BTHDP . Sold my first pair with my car so I bought a new pair off ebay for 20$. Just take off the little fuzzies and remove screws on either side. The side with the buttons has the chip and all the useful stuff the other side has the battery. Remove the speaker from the side with the buttons and the battery is almost a perfect fit. With a little melting with the solder its a perfect fit. All the important bits are labeled on the board itself(Batt +/-, Right/Left Channel +/-, and Mic). Resolder the battery, new cable for R/L channel + and the - from either channel a (its shared so you only need one) and the mic (if you even want the mic). Jacks bought at radio shack for less than 5 bucks and already had the cable but im sure you can find some there aswell. The FW/RW, play/phone button and volume keys remain fully functional. Less than 30 bucks and ~30 minutes later (probably longer the first time). You have a bluetooth A2DP device you can plug to headphones or anything else that has a 3.5mm jack. I use it for my car and home stereo. Charge with mini usb lasts about 16hours.
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  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by reeneebob View Post
    Wait - you demand compensation because Motorola sent Best Buy mislabeled product?

    Isn't that a tad entitled?

    Having worked customer service for a retailer, I can tell you that customers who demanded compensation for time spent on something that isn't the stores fault (like this situation) got adequate but bare minimum service. I would fix the issue and that's it. Customers who didn't come at me with an entitlement issue I would go above and beyond to help.

    Sorry, I can't imagine demanding a store compensate me for something Motorola did. That seems insanely selfish, arrogant, and rude.
    "What we have here is a failure to communicate!"--Warden in "Cool Hand Luke"

    Or, at least, I think so.

    Believe me, reeneebob, I can understand your frustrations from your retail experience; I would first ask you to be careful about assuming I know nothing of which you speak. I have had to deal with angry customers or clients for most of the 30 years of my adult working life. In fact, I've worked as a consultant doing assessments and training for one of the largest HR consulting firms in the world, so customer service (retail sales or otherwise) is something I appreciate and value.

    I sympathize with your reaction, but I think we both made some mistakes here: I wasn't clear enough and I think you made some unfortunate assumptions. For example, I never simply approach a retail staff member or customer service person and, right of the bat, start demanding things (cue the image of the waving arms of the "Lost in Space" robot ). Perhaps "demand" was too strong a word, so my bad; I would, however, like to point out that it can eventually come to that--eventually, meaning after I'm rebuffed as if the problem is mine and the retailer has little or no responsibility for the products or services they sell.

    That said, I would still advise retail staff to be patient with customers who, as you might define them, are acting "selfish, arrogant, and rude" right off the bat. With all due respect, I disagree that a retailer should simply write off the person and give them "bare minimum" help or service as a way to enact revenge or teach them a lesson. It's good to hear that you go above and beyond for customers you deem deserving of it, but many companies and organizations these days are demanding the staff offer this type of service to everyone because, quite simply, it pays off in the long run (e.g., Abe Lincoln was asked why he was trying to reconcile with the South after the war and he said something like, "The best way to eliminate your enemies is to make them your friends" or something like that).

    I do apologize if I came off too strong or gave you the impression I didn't respect the position of the retail staff or the company; I still stand by the belief that the company must take the hit for the time faulty products or labeling cost the customer and then take it up with their suppliers. The customer should not be expected to take it up with the manufacturer in all cases--sometimes yes, but often no. In the case jjeffcoast outlined above, I believe he was not treated up to the standards I expect.

    But if you disagree, that's cool. No harm, no foul.

    Overall, I prefer to nurture relationships with specific salespeople or business owners over a long period of time so I never have to worry about this sort of thing. They bend over backwards to help because I am fun to work with and because I make sure their managers get a letter or phone call outlining the great service I received (i.e., I don't just notify supervisors for bad service). For example, my local Sprint store manager has been a real gem because I did just as you recommend when I had a major, major headache dealing with the Sprint mothership and could not get satisfaction 2 years ago: he and I worked out a solution and began a great working relationship.

    jamiemazda: I, too, have experienced Sprint customer service via the phone/mothership as steadily improving (I've been with Sprint for over 10 years).

    Later!
    P.S. I do business with Best Buy all the time--when my favorite salesperson at Ultimate Electronics can't do better (and he usually can! ).
  15. #15  
    that's too bad .

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