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  1. #161  
    Engadget

    The good: The Palm Pre's multitasking capabilities and notifications system are unparalleled. The smartphone features a vibrant display with multitouch functionality as well as a solid Web browser and good multimedia integration. The Pre offered good call quality and wireless options include 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and GPS.

    The bad: The Pre's keyboard is cramped. Battery life drains quickly, and the smartphone can be sluggish at times. Lacks expansion slot, video-recording capabilities, onscreen keyboard, and Flash support. The Pre App Catalog is still in beta with a limited number of titles.

    The bottom line: Despite some missing features and performance issues that make it less than ideal for on-the-go professionals, the Palm Pre offers gadget lovers and consumers well-integrated features and unparalleled multitasking capabilities. The hardware could be better, but more importantly, Palm has developed a solid OS that not only rivals the competition but also sets a new standard in the way smartphones handle tasks and manage information

    We haven't seen so much buzz over a phone since the iPhone, but for the past six months, all eyes have been on the Palm Pre. Introduced at CES 2009, the Palm Pre quickly became the most anticipated phone of the year, not only for what it meant for Palm and Sprint--two companies struggling behind their competitors--but also for what the device promised. The multitasking features, the notification system, a physical keyboard, multitouch screen--all of these factors combined made it, in our opinion, the most legitimate rival to the iPhone yet.

    While the Pre finally gives Sprint customers something to be excited about, it won't please everyone. Early adopters, gadget lovers, and consumers who need or crave more functionality from their cell phone will be well-served by the Pre, though there is a little bit of a learning curve to the device. Also, because of the battery life and that slight bit of sluggishness, we'd don't think it's the best device for business users or road warriors.
  2. #162  
    Quote Originally Posted by rnld View Post
    HP bought Palm as a whole, not just WebOS. Were they stupid to buy it? It appears so.

    Their idea was much more than phones and tablets.

    As people love to speculate here - I think they were stunned at the lack of interest from the carriers and public in general in regard to WebOS.

    Why did Palm buy webOS - if webOS lacked interest to them?
    Why did HP buy webOS and firstly build mobile devices if webOS on mobile devices lacked interest to them?
    Just call me Berd.
  3. #163  
    The reviews were good in June 2009.
  4. #164  
    Quote Originally Posted by berdinkerdickle View Post
    Why did Palm buy webOS - if webOS lacked interest to them?
    Why did HP buy webOS and firstly build mobile devices if webOS on mobile devices lacked interest to them?
    I am not sure what you are saying. Just because Palm developed WebOS didn't automatically make it popular.

    Just because HP bought Palm didn't automatically make it hit either.

    Who knows who movie studios spend so much on movies that stiff. They don't think the audience isn't going to show up.
  5. #165  
    I think we've gone through the rounds..about why WebOS failed ..or didn't succeed as it should have.

    I guess the next question is how to make it succeed?...and this is what I think

    1. You need a decent device providing decent performance, that come with good quality design. Palm failed with the plastic pebble because they didn't do any studies on how people place their phones - (with keys, coins etc) and thus the pre was not durable.
    Interestingly Samsung phones are not that durable - 100% plastic casings (but they do not look cheap) but alot of folks are buying casings for their slabs to 'protect' their slim phones. Maybe to many people, psychologically 'my phone looks slim thus maybe it's better to put into a strong casing to protect it. Slab phones can feel more 'solid' then the Pre3s due to the design aspect. Less moving parts = less complexity on costs and less support headaches.

    2. Applications.
    Whoever is going to come up with a device needs to include key apps.
    - Facebook
    - Whatsapp
    - Dropbox or similar
    - a Multi messaging platform
    - Skype or similar.
    - Productivity (Word/ Excel similar)
    - Email
    - and a couple of nice fun games..
    - Think LG should have a Webos specific GPS application whereby same users of the app (similar to Foursquare) can find each other)

    For Enterprise
    - VPN
    - Secure Privacy authentication and ways to lock the phone when lost / or secure erase remotely, or mechanisms to monitor the phone or ability to hide specific areas of the phone (ala the privacy function found in some japanese phones)
    - Or even method to run a micro VM to run enterprise apps on phones. (dunno maybe some companies want to run citrix based Email / requisitions etc.



    3. Advertisements
    - if LG were to do advertisements No more stupid Ads. Do what a normal guy would use webos for and how it does it for the guy..
    e.g - office worker -> appt created in his office via Outlook, then it syncs with his appts in Webos, with address and such, Synergy links the client contact / address into the appt. And he gets lost finding his way to the client location - -synergy links to the GPS to get the location of the clients office.

    Summary : Advertisement should be scenario based which would identify with different groups of customers..(rotate the ad constantly).

    4. Revise the version number of webos.
    New owner, New version release with updates. If WEbos community works for mobile..add that feature in and change the version number to 4.0 or something...gives it a refresh look / reboot. Beside marketing, it gives a psychological mindset change to technies --some things have changed in the hood...
    In the meantime, LG /HP engineers can look at how to improve speed of apps...speeding Java apps etc etc.and the stuff behind the hood in subsequent releases / version changes

    5. Do not pass the control of version releases to the Mobile operators.
    LG should control this and not be held up by these mobile operators.. After all mobile phones via operators come with 1year and it's from the manufacturer. the Operator just acts like a go between and in some cases sells an insurance pack to sell more $$ but still relys on their mfg for support.
    Last edited by daexpression; 03/17/2013 at 10:53 PM.
  6. #166  
    Quote Originally Posted by rnld View Post
    I am not sure what you are saying. Just because Palm developed WebOS didn't automatically make it popular.

    Just because HP bought Palm didn't automatically make it hit either.

    Who knows who movie studios spend so much on movies that stiff. They don't think the audience isn't going to show up.
    I understand you not being sure what I'm saying; because it doesn't fit your own construed view of why webOS didn't succeed. But you've been told many times how the events surrounding its launch failed.
    The facts are all over in these forums. Just back up a few posts and we laid it all out for you.
    I have a better perspective than you because I had to be in the middle of the heat of it all as staff of these forums.
    The Movie was great. The audience did show. They said they loved the movie. The theater sucked, and there was no popcorn, so the audience left.
    Just call me Berd.
    geekpeter and TJs11thPre like this.
  7. #167  
    Quote Originally Posted by daexpression View Post
    I think we've gone through the rounds..about why WebOS failed ..or didn't succeed as it should have.

    I guess the next question is how to make it succeed?...and this is what I think

    1. You need a decent device providing decent performance, that come with good quality design. Palm failed with the plastic pebble because they didn't do any studies on how people place their phones - (with keys, coins etc) and thus the pre was not durable.
    Interestingly Samsung phones are not that durable - 100% plastic casings (but they do not look cheap) but alot of folks are buying casings for their slabs to 'protect' their slim phones. Maybe to many people, psychologically 'my phone looks slim thus maybe it's better to put into a strong casing to protect it. Slab phones can feel more 'solid' then the Pre3s due to the design aspect. Less moving parts = less complexity on costs and less support headaches.

    2. Applications.
    Whoever is going to come up with a device needs to include key apps.
    - Facebook
    - Whatsapp
    - Dropbox or similar
    - a Multi messaging platform
    - Skype or similar.
    - Productivity (Word/ Excel similar)
    - Email
    - and a couple of nice fun games..
    - Think LG should have a Webos specific GPS application whereby same users of the app (similar to Foursquare) can find each other)

    For Enterprise
    - VPN
    - Secure Privacy authentication and ways to lock the phone when lost / or secure erase remotely, or mechanisms to monitor the phone or ability to hide specific areas of the phone (ala the privacy function found in some japanese phones)
    - Or even method to run a micro VM to run enterprise apps on phones. (dunno maybe some companies want to run citrix based Email / requisitions etc.



    3. Advertisements
    - if LG were to do advertisements No more stupid Ads. Do what a normal guy would use webos for and how it does it for the guy..
    e.g - office worker -> appt created in his office via Outlook, then it syncs with his appts in Webos, with address and such, Synergy links the client contact / address into the appt. And he gets lost finding his way to the client location - -synergy links to the GPS to get the location of the clients office.

    Summary : Advertisement should be scenario based which would identify with different groups of customers..(rotate the ad constantly).

    4. Revise the version number of webos.
    New owner, New version release with updates. If WEbos community works for mobile..add that feature in and change the version number to 4.0 or something...gives it a refresh look / reboot. Beside marketing, it gives a psychological mindset change to technies --some things have changed in the hood...
    In the meantime, LG /HP engineers can look at how to improve speed of apps...speeding Java apps etc etc.and the stuff behind the hood in subsequent releases / version changes

    5. Do not pass the control of version releases to the Mobile operators.
    LG should control this and not be held up by these mobile operators.. After all mobile phones via operators come with 1year and it's from the manufacturer. the Operator just acts like a go between and in some cases sells an insurance pack to sell more $$ but still relys on their mfg for support.
    Good post.
    And you are correct in saying this:
    Quote Originally Posted by daexpression View Post
    I think we've gone through the rounds..about why WebOS failed ..or didn't succeed as it should have.

    I guess the next question is how to make it succeed?
    We will not litter this or any other thread with this same old argument again.
    Just call me Berd.
  8. #168  
    WARNING:

    Members have requested that this old debate of why webOS / Palm / HP failed, not be allowed to continue to litter threads.
    It has never been a constructive debate.
    I've been reminded that this is not a debate site.
    It's a user-to-user support community for webOS enthusiasts.

    Thank you for your cooperation.
    -Berd
    Just call me Berd.
  9. #169  
    Daexpressions posting contained valid points as far as I see it.

    But generally, good marketing is rested on following pillars:

    1) Product
    Obviously you need a good product to sell it. WebOS is great, we know that. Sadly, there's neither hardware, nor any mentionable app-infrastructure left. So productwise, LG would have to start here.

    2) Pricing
    Introducing a product to a market, you should calculate very hard. If you use distributors (like mobile providers), you need to be sure, that they have a real incentive to sell your product while being sure, that the price is not too high for the customer. It would be wise for LG (always assuming they are willing to produce WebOS devices like smartphones or tablets) to offer the first-in-a-row device for a low price (break even, generate revenue but not yet earnings) and then offer the next, better devices for reasonable prices. I.e. offer a WiFi only tablet without GPS (like the Touchpad) for peanuts and then deliver the 4G+GPS tablet for a reasonable price. Then you have a "gateway drug" for the new user and a better option for the WebOS-addicted.

    3) Distribution
    If LG would create smartphones and tablets, then they should not repeat Palms and HPs errors and deliver to none but a few marketplaces. The should close up the whole of europe, especially the very rich countries (Swizerland, Austria etc...) and the very poor ones.
    The cheaply priced starter device described above could break market in economic third word countries as well. These are the places to go and be the first one there.
    Third party providers like mobile-services providers are only putting phones up front into the shopping window, if their earning-margins are good enough. I bought my first Palm Pre+ in Germany (was not available in Austria) in a Vodaphone shop which had the device NOT on display in the shopping window, but in a drawer behind the counter in the back of the shop. LG needs to keep distributors either happy or on a tight leash (or both).

    4) Advertisement
    This is the thing, everyone mistakes for marketing. Ads are important, but only if done right. If not done right, you just blow a hell lot of money out the window and make your product a dust-catcher on the shelve.
    Ads need to reach the right people, so you have to know who your target customers are. Then you have to produce the right ads and get them through the right media-channels (TV, magazines, etc).
    A good representation of your product makes people have it in mind, when they go and buy something similar. I.e. if someone needs a smartphone and goes out to buy one, you would want him to have your product in mind. This is important, but does not yet make him buy it.
    To generate a "must have" feeling, you need to have unique selling propositions, something that a) only your product has and b) is something hip/useful/cool/whatever...

    ----
    If LG ever wants to produce WebOS devices for the smartphone/tablet market, they need to get these point sright. There are many examples of how it is done right (Apple, Samsung) and especially in the WebOS history, there are many "how not to do it" examples.
    It is allowed to make mistakes as long as
    a) you can afford it and
    b) you learn from it.

    Oh and yes, it is allowed to learn from the mistakes others are making as well

    ---

    ok, this is more an answer to "HOW" then a "WHY" LG could be successful, but it's more on topic that many other posings here
    Last edited by Buddy1969; 03/18/2013 at 02:54 AM. Reason: typos... hope I found most of them ;)
    War doesn't prove who's right, only who's left...
  10. #170  
    Quote Originally Posted by daexpression View Post
    ...5. Do not pass the control of version releases to the Mobile operators.
    LG should control this and not be held up by these mobile operators.. After all mobile phones via operators come with 1year and it's from the manufacturer. the Operator just acts like a go between and in some cases sells an insurance pack to sell more $$ but still relys on their mfg for support...
    There's the sticking point.

    Carriers.

    In the US they often cause more problems than create solutions.

    They want a contract for a new phone - or rigid criteria for upgrades. They want their own "flavor" on the phone. A logo of their corporation and their own Apps like navigation and consumer searches. They want you beholden to them for an unlock. All their attention is focused on signing service contracts and retaining users. Obviously that is their business and they want to protect it.

    Look at an Android update. Google pushes it out. OEMs put their spin on it, touchwiz, timescape, whatchawhosit. Then Google has to look and say, "yeah, that passes our criteria." Then OEMs push it to carriers... Now they look at it and decide if it meets their branding requirements before they'll allow an OTA update. Maybe it does, maybe it doesn't. They don't care much. It doesn't sell new phones or sign new contracts. It makes a few people happy if an update slips through the system once in awhile. But only for phones that have gotten a lot of contracts signed or burned up a lot of upgrade credits.

    How about the unlock decision? Sure there is noise about getting it worked around or reversed. Still won't benefit the average consumer much. All this talk about right to unlock doesn't mean anything outside the tech fan arena. Soccer-mom, Mr Busy Exec, Grampa Fishalot, I'm-all-thumbs-and-break-every-gadget-I-touch; these people aren't unlocking their phones. They use 'em till they're done and move on to the next one. Their old phone goes in a drawer, gets recycled or given to nephew Stevie to have something to play with.

    The carriers like it that way. It's become hugely inconvenient for the average consumer to switch carriers or phones. They'll simply place more speed bumps in the road every chance they get.

    Now look at an OEM. They want to sell more phones too. Where do they go? To the carriers.

    There might be a chance here to break that cycle. Google's trying it. You can buy an unlocked, LG made, Nexus 4 at Google Play for a very attractive price. Apple's succeeding at it. You can waltz in to any number of Apple Stores and plunk down cash for a phone...

    Don't go the carrier route. Don't share logo and branding space with carriers. Don't pass them any control, for update approval - distribution or on any other matter.

    Part of the FCC leasing of spectrum agreements forbids hindering of which device customers can use on that spectrum. Search for the Verizon decision that was handed down in the past 6 months and read the wording of that decision. If my device is capable of operating on that spectrum they are obligated to allow it access. It was trumpeted as a win for allowing free access to rooting Apps, but that was only half the decision. The other half was about free device access to the spectrum. Read it and see.

    Sure there is a technical component to it. Getting configured. CDMA presents problems. CDMA carriers are horribly rigid. I think the time is right for consumers to start voting with their $$$ and either forcing CDMA carriers to rethink how they allow access or lose customers in droves. GSM is easier. If the device is unlocked, the technical barrier to configuration is pretty low.

    More carriers and mvnos are offering a "Bring Your Own Device" option. So why use carriers at all?

    What if LG had a webOS device website and you could order unlocked phones there for plug and play use on carrier networks?

    Sure the price isn't the same as a carrier subsidized deal... But studies show that buying a phone outright and shopping for the right plan to fit your needs saves the consumer money in the long run. This point can be hammered home. And if you cut out the carrier middle-man, the price is reduced. Surely it is plain to see that LG can sell direct at a lower cost/retail price per unit than through a carrier's storefront network. And carriers will want these devices on their networks because service represents money to them. Look at how they all want to welcome iPhone and how that is breaking out of the locked-to-carrier model. There is plenty of precedent.

    And carriers don't even lose out on upselling of services. Look at Verizon Navigation or AT&T Navigation. The carriers write those Apps... They can still offer whatever add ons they want. And LG could either roll out OTA updates via an App Catalog set-up or manually through a desktop client.

    Now what if LG went further? They have relationships with many retailers through their highly diverse product portfolio. What if LG got their unlocked webOS devices into some of those retail stores as appropriate? You want that LG TV. You want that new webOS powered Smart Refrigerator that helps track what groceries you need. You have the smart washer and dryer. Of course you need an LG tablet or phone that interacts seamlessly with your home... Lots of great demo opportunities there to help sell all your product lines.

    At work, you remember you forgot to record your favorite daytime show. No worries; your LG tablet, powered by webOS, contacts your LG Smart TV and sets up the recording. Before leaving work, synergy connects your phone to the 'fridge and updates your shopping list. At the checkout, you use your phone to set your clothes drier to a 20 minute cycle so it will get all the wrinkles out of your clothes and they'll be ready to put away after the groceries are unpacked. Pass each item by the scanner and it marks it off the shopping list for you.

    Then you can settle in and watch that show you didn't miss because... Life's Good.

    Think the above scenario is far fetched? Then you didn't see the LG presentation at CES 2013.
    Lumia 1520.3 (the Beastly Unicorn): Windows 10 Mobile

    Windows Central Senior Ambassador

    Mobile Nations Devotee
  11. #171  
    My phone knows my route to work.
    It knows what time I start.
    An alert pops up and says I need to leave early because there is a traffic jam.
    My phone then plans me a new route to get to work on time.
    Just call me Berd.
    RumoredNow likes this.
  12. #172  
    Quote Originally Posted by berdinkerdickle View Post
    My phone knows my route to work.
    It knows what time I start.
    An alert pops up and says I need to leave early because there is a traffic jam.
    My phone then plans me a new route to get to work on time.
    If I lived more than 5 minutes drive time from my job, I'd want this too.
    Lumia 1520.3 (the Beastly Unicorn): Windows 10 Mobile

    Windows Central Senior Ambassador

    Mobile Nations Devotee
  13. #173  
    Google Now? It constantly wanted to get me back to the airport when I was out of town once.
  14. #174  
    I see the official release of the HTC One has been delayed by problems in the component supply chain. Their suppliers consider them no longer a 'tier-one' customer although they are apparently number three in the market.

    It's a nice looking phone. The reviews have been raves. I gather the logo can be mapped as a button if xda-developers get a tweaked kernel working. It would be a great piece of hardware for webOS - especially if that button area could become a gesture area! Of course the old graphics acceleration problem would no doubt arise.

    So, if Samsung and Apple are way ahead of everyone else - to the extent that the number three is considered second tier, where does this leave LG? I don't know their market share, but it can't be huge. That said, the market is world wide and demand is high. Even the smaller players can make money, but if a duopoly starts to affect the supply chain of the other manufacturers, something needs to be done to disrupt the market.

    The android sector has tried to beat apple on price, on features & now on hardware design. What's left? Oh. yeah:
    User Experience.

    The petition is approaching 2000 signatures, but I was a bit depressed to see the thread had 77 posts, but 3,873 views. I don't know how the views are calculated - presumably individual views rather than per user, but those posters must be revisiting an awful lot or (sigh) there are a lot more lookers than there are signers!

    This thread has even more views!

    Here's the link again:

    https://www.change.org/petitions/lg-...-and-tablets-2
  15. #175  
    I just saw this:

    Samsung Will Release Tizen-Based Smartphone This Year - Bloomberg

    Samsung has the muscle to do this now. Maybe all their future smartphones will be, "Android or Tizen - you choose".

    Tizen is open source, but then so is Android and using Android puts you in Google's hands. There are lots of predictions of manufacturers moving to the apple model - a hardware and software combined experience. If Tizen gains mind-share, then the rest of the market might find themselves looking at Apple/iOS and Samsung/Tizen. They might even find Motorola/Android cleaning up the leftover crumbs.

    Cling to Android? Jump to Tizen? Build your own solution? All risky options and a fragmented market is likely to eventually reconsolidate around 2-4 main players again. Unless of course, apps and services become more cross platform. Then the users pick their preferred OS and stop worrying about apps - because most apps will be cross-platform. Hardware and UX will be the key differentiators.

    Just a thought...


    https://www.change.org/petitions/lg-...-and-tablets-2
  16. #176  
    Quote Originally Posted by rnld View Post
    "Leo" getting fired did not change my life in the least. HP made some bad deals - Palm being one of them.

    The phones were not selling, the Touchpad was a generation behind the iPad and weekly sales dwindled after a tepid launch week. If "Leo" would have kept WebOS going or not, it was a huge money loser. In the end, maybe less so buy cutting spending on the project and making a bit back from the fire sale.

    The carriers did not want the phone line and retailers didn't want the Touchpad after it stiffed. It doesn't get more simple.
    Obviosuly, but HP shouldn't have given up after one bad product. They should've known what they were getting themselves into.
    they needed to fix webOS and should've KNOWN they were going to struggle with it.

    "Huge money loser."

    they know they have to invest to improve webOS in order to make profit. Not just rush a last generation tablet and pray that it does well. They didn't even try. It was HP's fault, not webOS.
  17. #177  
    Quote Originally Posted by PrePixiLove View Post
    Obviosuly, but HP shouldn't have given up after one bad product.
    THIS mindset needs to be flushed from anyone's mind which holds it.

    HP did not "give up on webOS" because of any product.

    HP was trying to get on track with exactly what IBM did, and what Dell is doing now.

    PC manufacturers have a new focus: CLOUD SERVICES. MANAGED SERVICES.

    just like any car dealership, it's not the SALES dept. that's paying the bills, it's the SERVICE dept.

    I met Michael Dell about a month ago. He came on site to do some face-time with THE strongest segment of the new Dell Services Division. And what he told us was very simple and very sensible. IBM, Dell, and HP are all well aware that hardware is no longer the revenue generator. IT'S SERVICES. The margin on the services that this particular division provides, IS INSANE. This company is raking in loot hand-over-fist; and is so promising that Mr. Dell is putting up his own cash to take the company BACK TO PRIVATE OWNERSHIP. Sure, they say "boot the Board for more autonomy". The truth is, they don't want to share the wealth.

    I saw this same thing happen with a previous company I worked for, which also COMPLETELY REALIGNED its business plan, and in doing so started pulling in so much cash, they ALSO went private.

    Managed Cloud Services, in particular, SECURITY services, is the new gold rush for tech companies, and anyone not staking a claim is not going to be a player of any significance as time goes on.

    and HP became aware of this, right around the time we were standing at the door with our trick-or-treat bag and ringing the Pre3 doorbell. Unfortunately we got a trick and no treat. But it had NOTHING to do with webOS or Pre hardware.

    Watch and see as HP reorg's and what direction they take. It won't be focused on the horrendous business market of cellular handsets, which is dominated by the SERVICE CARRIERS, not the OEM's. Why bother dealing with the excessive demands of the Carriers, the restrictions of govt. FCC etc.? The new frontier is wide open, barely regulated, and ripe for the picking, because EVERY SINGLE BUSINESS ON THIS PLANET has the same fear of hacker intrusion; they're scared, and they want protection. Who's going to provide it? Right now, Dell is signing on more business than they can keep up with.

    RumoredNow hit the nail on the head a few posts up, as far as CONSUMER ELECTRONICS goes. The biz will be dominated by the manufacturers that OWN production, not purchasing it. That's Samsung and LG types, not IBM and HP types. So why try to compete when you can't. And why try to swim in a dried-up creek, when there's a sweet new pool just waiting for you to dive in.

    it's a complete paradigm shift, folks. Some of you need to pull your heads out of the sand, stop blubbering about "weak TPad sales", and see what's right in front of your face. Or stand back and be quiet as it unfolds around you. Try not to look too slack-jawed.

    aw crap, i just realized i'm replying to a thread that was 3 mos cold and someone woke it up. Sorry. But i just typed all this so...whatever.
    Remy X and RumoredNow like this.
  18. #178  
    Zombie thread FTW!

    @TJs11thPre,

    Completely agree with you... but then at the same time, no matter how lucrative the new cloud-computing business is, Apotheker was really lame-brained in his realignment strategy. Hardware =/= software, and in trying to stick their manufacturing partners with the losses instead of taking responsibility and following through, they really nuked their credibility (and the stock value).

    I have always wondered how Hurd would have managed this transition, had he stayed with the company...
    RumoredNow likes this.
  19. #179  
    Quote Originally Posted by TJs11thPre View Post
    ...aw crap, i just realized i'm replying to a thread that was 3 mos cold and someone woke it up. Sorry. But i just typed all this so...whatever.
    Well it is still a great topic and way more relevant than the Treo users from 2005 asking about blocking selective callers...
    Lumia 1520.3 (the Beastly Unicorn): Windows 10 Mobile

    Windows Central Senior Ambassador

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    Remy X likes this.
  20. #180  
    Quote Originally Posted by Remy X View Post
    Zombie thread FTW!

    @TJs11thPre,

    Completely agree with you... but then at the same time, no matter how lucrative the new cloud-computing business is, Apotheker was really lame-brained in his realignment strategy. Hardware =/= software, and in trying to stick their manufacturing partners with the losses instead of taking responsibility and following through, they really nuked their credibility (and the stock value).

    I have always wondered how Hurd would have managed this transition, had he stayed with the company...
    y'no, i'll belay commentary on Mr. Apocalypse, but only because i prefer to scapegoat him for personal reasons. i have to blame SOMEone for keeping me from having a Pre4 right now with dual core processor and LTE!

    but honestly, he was in charge of a very, very big, and historically very sloppy company for only a short time. and at a significant point in the evolution of personal computing, global economics, and emerging markets. think about it just for a moment, the US economy in turmoil and intentionally stuck this way for a while as the elite found it's more fun and profitable to hedge bet on the proverbial 'Don't Come' line (as in Craps, people); the predictably unpredictable global consumer market racing toward the personal mobile technology horizon as fast as it can be produced and packaged; and emerging markets all over the globe, which will be gobbled up by China if they don't get their foot in the door asap. And of course, the ever growing threat of cyber crime, as more and more people turn to illegal means of income because there's such a drought of the legal kind. What's a tech CEO to do?? Especially when they look around to see where they are in line in contrast to the usual suspects, and they've all left for a more promising show! Hey i'm not in the back of the line anymore, because everyone left! is that a good thing? hey wait...

    ***

    I doubt that guy had a CLUE what was the "right" move. They should have bet their farm on a cellphone OS as the foundation of their next decade of technology?? When they knew that Microsoft was going to launch a tablet with the consumer-confident-reputation of full-blown Windows within a year??? And then you hear that your closest competitor, while slowly chipping away at your market share, is actually investing in everything BUT consumer PC production???? holy hard drives, batman!

    So you listen to a dozen different opinions from people with a dozen different agendas, and you take a shot in the dark because what's true today may be hogwash tomorrow. The President has this same conundrum. How the heck can anyone think they're "leading" something that's so big it moves on its own, just like a pack of lemmings as they walk themselves off a cliff. And no matter what you do, someone is going to say it's great and someone is going to say it's awful, because they're concerned only with how it affects them personally, not what's right or what's best.

    I read an article today that people in North Korea have made refrigerators a 'status symbol' of sorts. It's become fashionable to have one in their home. yes, the fridge that we take for granted as a standard part of every kitchen in the US. And the article stated that most don't even store food in it, because power outages are so frequent. So they use them as book shelves.

    If THAT doesn't give you a quick little perspective change, then you're really stuck in your own personal Class 5 emotional hurricane.

    "first world problems" like which smartphone we're able to buy or not buy, will decrease soon enough. TOO soon. as the class warfare continues to rage, as nations like India, Pakistan, China, Argentina, all fight for their piece of the global economic pie, and most importantly, AS PEOPLE KEEP ON BREEDING, sucking up resources faster than we can squeeze them from the planet, the closer we get to destroying our own civilization, all the while blaming "the other guy". but hey, serfdom wasn't so bad, was it? we still have some nice pyramids, and other cool stuff like that. it'll be fine.

    one of the most fickle things about growing old is PERSPECTIVE. it's a gift and a curse.

    hug someone today/tomorrow. in fact, try to find one person to hug a day. i bet it's a challenge for many of us, me included. but if we don't reprioritize soon, we'll be so far off track we won't be AWARE of it anymore. and then we're truly lost.

    Remy X and RumoredNow like this.
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