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  1. tvo7's Avatar
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       #1  
    1. I just got my treo pro, my carrier t-Mobile
    2. I live in Houston Texas
    3. My friend got the G1 and on Tmobile
    4. We are both sitting next to each other. Hers connects to 3G no problem. Mine always connects to EDGE.
    5. I called Tmobile - they say treo pro not compatible with 3G
    6. I called palm support they say try soft reset - didn't work

    Anyone else have any ideas?
  2. #2  
    The Treo Pro won't work on T-mo 3g, wrong band.

    Palm said Soft Reset?
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by tvo7 View Post
    1. I just got my treo pro, my carrier t-Mobile
    2. I live in Houston Texas
    3. My friend got the G1 and on Tmobile
    4. We are both sitting next to each other. Hers connects to 3G no problem. Mine always connects to EDGE.
    5. I called Tmobile - they say treo pro not compatible with 3G
    6. I called palm support they say try soft reset - didn't work

    Anyone else have any ideas?
    I think T-Mobile's right. I read that other places on the web. The Pro is not compatible with T-Mobile's 3G.
    Treo Pro ROCKS! I am a lucky one to have one. XPS M1730s ROCK!! (I wish I had one!) My laptop ROCKS! (Even though it isn't an M1730)
  4. tvo7's Avatar
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       #4  
    really? How come treo pro says 3g compatible. I see numerous posts about how "they love their treo pro and 3g connection on tmobile" on this website.
    2. Does this mean if I want to use my tro pro as modem for my laptop, to get 3g speeds rather then edge speed, I will have to switch to ATT?
  5. CDG
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by tvo7 View Post
    really? How come treo pro says 3g compatible. I see numerous posts about how "they love their treo pro and 3g connection on tmobile" on this website.
    2. Does this mean if I want to use my tro pro as modem for my laptop, to get 3g speeds rather then edge speed, I will have to switch to ATT?
    T-Mobile is 1700 3G & the GTP is 850/1900/2100 3G. The Treo Pro is AT&T & Eurasian 3G compatible but not T-Mobile. I am not sure what post you are referring to but it is not possible to be on T-Mobile 3G with it.

    In this country yes you will need to be on AT&T or any other GSM provider that uses 850 or 1900 3G.
  6. chong67's Avatar
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    #6  
    Is GSM 850 only in USA?

    I thought it would be GSM 900 as this is international.
    Dell x51v → Motorola Q (Verizon) → Mogul → 800w → Treo Pro → Touch Pro 2 (SERO) → HTC EVO 3D → HTC EVO 4G LTE → HTC One S → Nexus 4
  7. #7  
    The GSM TP is quadband for calls, meaning the frequencies 850 (US) 900 (World), 1800 and 1900 Mhz. In addition the 3G Radio will use 1800 and 2100 Mhz (HSDPA/UMTS).
    Treo Pro Playtime
  8. CDG
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Fintan View Post
    The GSM TP is quadband for calls, meaning the frequencies 850 (US) 900 (World), 1800 and 1900 Mhz. In addition the 3G Radio will use 1800 and 2100 Mhz (HSDPA/UMTS).
    Sorry to disgree but the 3G Radio is 850/1900 and 2100 Mhz.
  9. #9  
    850 would make it EDGE, 2.5G.
    For me that would be 900 Mhz being out of the US. For others providers here it could be 1800 Mhz.

    3(.5)G would use 1900/2100 (and for the poor t-mobile US clients 1700).
  10. CDG
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Fintan View Post
    850 would make it EDGE, 2.5G.
    For me that would be 900 Mhz being out of the US. For others providers here it could be 1800 Mhz.

    3(.5)G would use 1900/2100 (and for the poor t-mobile US clients 1700).
    850 does not only mean EDGE, AT&T started out with their 3G on 1900 and has been going more & more into 850 3G. My area has 850 3G in fact.

    The treo Pro is quad band for voice just as you mention but for 3G it is 850, 1900, and 2100 MHz.

    Here are the specifications for it.
    Please Visit My Other Hangout
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    Palm Pilot > Palm IIIxe > Palm Vx > Palm Treo 750 > Palm Treo Pro > BB 9700.
  11. #11  
    Ah, ok.
    USA have some weird things in the GSM networking - the 850 Mhz band is one of them.

    Many things we have here (EU) wouldn't apply at your place (US).

    Thank God I live in europe though... the pricing in US is outrageous. The mess in networks is one reason for that I assume.

    In case I ever get to the US, I'll be happy to try the 850 3G l0l.
  12. #12  
    An interesting read:
    850/900/1800/1900

    Which is better, 850 or 1900? In general, you are going to get more performance out of 850 than you are going to get out of 1900 for several reasons. 1. As mentioned earlier, back when the 850 licenses were issued, they had to cover a certain amount of land cover. This required deploying their system throughout many rural areas (not ALL though). 1900 licenses only need to cover up to 67% of the population, and in many cases they don't even have to meet that. 2. The higher the frequency, the shorter the usable range. You need approximately twice as many 1900 MHz towers to cover a given area than 850 MHz towers. Most 1900 MHz towers are in urban and suburban areas. A properly built 1900 system will work as well as a properly built 850 system, but it will likely cost more to deploy and operate. Sometimes 1900 will work better in a city because 1900 MHz signals tend to work better in the middle of the city with large buildings as the shorter wavelength allows the signal to go around corners easier. Also, due to network loading, 850 towers have to be "turned down" in urban areas so as to not overload, so the playing field is leveled. 3. Leaving the technical details aside, it seems that 850 MHz signals penetrate most modern buildings better than 1900 MHz signals. There are many factors involved such as the material of the walls, the proximity of the local cell towers and various other factors. The fact that 850 MHz carriers have been in operation longer and have optimized their coverage is an important factor to consider. If there is a window nearby, chances are that either system will work, assuming that there is some sort of signal available at the window! The bottom line is this: when you try out a service, make sure you bring your phone to all the areas you'll be using to make sure it works where you need it.
    Just call me Berd.
  13. #13  
    From Engadget:

    Palm Treo Pro gets props from Telstra for extreme signal strength

    by Chris Ziegler, posted Sep 4th 2008 at 9:50AM
    For our money, there's really nothing worse than dropping a few hundred bucks on a shiny new 3G toy, taking it home to the Outback, and realizing that we're getting more wallaby meat than we are reception. Happily, Telstra has a pretty unique program in the carrier world -- dubbed "Blue Tick" -- that awards certain devices in its lineup for their killer signal strength, which theoretically makes them more appropriate choices for use in rural and fringe areas where lesser phones might struggle. Interestingly, the Treo Pro is now the first smartphone in Telstra's Blue Tick range -- which they're offering for as little as zilch on a two year contract, by the by -- making it a solid choice for anyone around the world who's looking for a modern WinMo set with enough signal-pulling power to make a Motorola V365 green with envy. Only question is, can we still completely encase it in gold and hold a call?
    I agree
    Just call me Berd.

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