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  1.    #1  
    I don't know how many of you want to try this? I have insurance. But here it goes.

    I use HomeScreen++ to monitor my battery life, power consumption and processor use. I have tons of applications loaded. I notice that my temperature usually average around 90-95F deg. and my phone is always warm. I know that batteries drain faster when its warm. Side note: that's why you should store new and un-used battery in a cool area; my physics professor stores it in temperature controlled frig. I am so frustrated with the battery life, I decided to try cooling my treo.

    I put my treo into the frig for about 30mins and the phone cooled down to 40F deg. Pulled it and it warmed to about 75F deg and averaged around that. My battery life usually last about 12hrs, after the frig experiment the battery life last for about 3 days. Then after about 3 weeks it starts to return to my 12hr battery life.

    This is the second time I have done this. The first time I tried this, I thought the battery life increase was due to uninstalling some software/mods. After the 2nd time of the frig experiment and not making any software changes, I notice that battery life increase was due to cooling down the treo.

    I decided to post this and see if anyone can repeat my experiment.
  2. #2  
    ...that doesn't sound like something I'll try
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by tmatma04 View Post
    ...that doesn't sound like something I'll try
    Yeah...I don't know if putting my Treo in the frig is something i wanna do...
  4. #4  
    I would think that condensation could trigger the water damage indicator. Possible?
  5. #5  
    I'll try.

    There's some truth in it. Though it is interesting that the effect lasted so long.

    Word of advice: definitely do not freeze the battery and charge! That can seriously damage the battery.
    Quote Originally Posted by SandersJC1964 View Post
    I would think that condensation could trigger the water damage indicator. Possible?
    Not in 35-40 degree range--should be okay. Plus your fridge should be pulling moisture, not leaving it.

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  6. #6  
    Can you accomplish the same thing by just putting the battery in the frig?

    FWIW, I tried this and in the two hours since I pulled it out, my battery has gone down 20%. I been screwing with street view, gps, texting and playing the casino game since I took it out. Seems like normal battery drain so far.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    Not in 35-40 degree range--should be okay. Plus your fridge should be pulling moisture, not leaving it.
    Yeah, but what happens when you remove the phone from the fridge and it starts to warm up? That's when condensation forms.

    Take a jug of milk out of the fridge and leave it on the counter for 10 - 15 minutes and you'll see what I mean. Condensation city.
  8. #8  
    The things we have to do for battery life...
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chimmer View Post
    Yeah, but what happens when you remove the phone from the fridge and it starts to warm up? That's when condensation forms.

    Take a jug of milk out of the fridge and leave it on the counter for 10 - 15 minutes and you'll see what I mean. Condensation city.
    Guess it'll depend on where you live and the current humidity level?

    I mean here in the North East, I charge my 800w while riding a motorcycle in 25F degree weather and have had no issues, lol.

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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    Guess it'll depend on where you live and the current humidity level?

    I mean here in the North East, I charge my 800w while riding a motorcycle in 25F degree weather and have had no issues, lol.
    Yes that's true. I'm in the southeast and I know in the summer, when I step out of my air conditioned car and into the heat, my glasses fog up so bad I can't see anything. I was also thinking of the milk jug example as well. I don't think I'll be trying it.
  11. #11  
    I dont see how this can do anything.

    Heat does not drain the battery- the unit produces the heat when it is working- when it is working it is using battery. Cooling it does not change anything. It is still using the same amount of energy the heat being produced is just less obvious.

    Were am I wrong?
    Neopoint 1000, I300, Treo 300, i330, Toshiba 2032, Treo 600, T608/UX50, I500,Treo 600, G1000, Treo 650, PPC-6600, PPC-6700, Treo 650, Blackberry 7250, Treo 700wx, Motorola Q, PPC-6800, 700wx, Motorola Q9c, Sprint Touch, Sprint ACE, 700wx, 800w, Touch Pro, 800w, Touch Diamond, 800w, Treo Pro, Palm Pre, HTC Hero, Palm Pre, EVO 4G warm2.2
  12.    #12  
    It's worked for me. So it's something to try if you really hate the battery life.

    Condensation does build, but it didn't effect my treo, just dry it.

    Next time my battery life starts to suck, I just place the battery in the frig.


    Quote Originally Posted by Les Anderson View Post
    I dont see how this can do anything.
    the unit produces the heat when it is working- when it is working it is using battery.
    Were am I wrong?
    I understand if you're using it ie making a call, it should be warm. When you arn't doing anything with it, it's just on standby, it shouldn't be warm.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by yangqdr View Post
    Condensation does build, but it didn't effect my treo, just dry it.
    I think the question was "will it activate the water damage indicator?"

    That can be a problem if people have to take their phone in for a repair and that's one reason people are reluctant to try it.
  14. #14  
    When I use to race little 1/10 scale off-road radio controlled cars - the "thing" to do to get more battery life to sustain the whole race was to put your batteries in a cooler and than run a full charge into them which btw worked way better than fully charging a warm battery.

    You could not only go faster cause you could push more volts/current into it but you could get an extra lap or two from the batteries that were charged this way by this cooling process. This was proven by all racers both off road and parking lot pavement.

    Just put the battery in the fridge for a while until it cools (maybe 10 to 15 minutes) or for those that live where it is cold and snowy outside, shovel your driveway or sidewalk while your phone is in your holster or pocket and when you get in, put your phone on the charger and leave it there until it is fully charged. I am sure it will help you a little from "that" charge. I have no idea if it helps long term though.

    You sure can't hurt it - as heat, depending how hot is always bad for electronics compared to cool - heck run your computer with no fan on todays cpu's and see if they like it - thermal overload seems to happen between 285 to 325 degrees before shutdown on most electronic components.

    Of course you could always buy a bigger battery or keep it top off in a charger.
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  15. #15  
    I guess not everyone here has done the "old batteries in the frig for a little extra juice" trick at some point in your lives .

    If I needed more battery life I'd do this. I'm fine with the battery life as is on the 800w, so I probably never will do it.

    The milk jug analogy is not fully comparable. Given the milk jug is full of fluid. Consider what might happen if you put something closer to the consistency of a brick in the refrigerator and took it out 30 minutes later. You would not have much condensation on the brick. (I know the 800w is not 100% fluid free, but it's probably closer to a brick than a jug of milk.) But still, just to be safe, anyone trying this probably wants to have the insurance. Although I doubt the water damage indicator will be triggered. These devices as was mentioned can be used outside on cold days and gain a similar effect. And nobody is complaining they had their Treo outside on a cold day and it died from condensation .

    The length of the effect is surprising, although I would expect some benefit.

    A unit that runs hotter is far less efficient, meaning that the unit is going to demand more resources (power) and that will result in less overall battery life. I'm sorry I don't have a good means to explain WHY, but if you study a bit about CPU overclocking you might better understand.

    I've never said it here, but I've certainly been thinking about it, water cooled hand helds probably would work well and I would not be surprised if some company does it. There are already water cooled GPUs (video cards) and water coolers for PCs (I've considered putting one in my Thermaltake case). Water coolers, they're not just for cars anymore .
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    I guess not everyone here has done the "old batteries in the frig for a little extra juice" trick at some point in your lives .

    That is not really the OP's premise. The premise as I interperet is if the device is cooled it uses less battery.
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  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    The milk jug analogy is not fully comparable.
    It is in the context in which I gave the answer. More specifically, I was replying to this statement:

    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    Not in 35-40 degree range--should be okay. Plus your fridge should be pulling moisture, not leaving it.
    The point that I was trying to make is that condensation does not form in the refrigerator (unless you leave the door open.) It forms when something that's been chilled (jug of milk) is removed from the cold environment and placed in a warmer environment (counter top.) Since the jug of milk is cooler than the temperature of the surrounding air (when placed on the counter) - the moisture in the air condenses on the surface of the milk jug.

    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    Given the milk jug is full of fluid
    The fact that the milk jug is full of fluid is irrelevant. The condensation isn't coming from the fluid, it's coming from the moisture in the air outside the jug. The fluid may hold the colder temperature longer which allows more condensation to form.

    I used to wear glasses as a kid. I would play in the snow for hours and as soon as I entered a warm house, the glasses would instantly fog up. The glasses contained no fluid but condensation still formed on the outside.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Les Anderson View Post
    That is not really the OP's premise. The premise as I interperet is if the device is cooled it uses less battery.
    Not only does it use less battery, it literally can be overclocked to do more when cooler, without great additional battery strain.

    Just as you can do more in the cold with less energy expended, but wear down much more easily in the heat, these devices have some similarity in that regard. Consider how much more yard work you can get done on a cooler day than a hotter one. That's about as simplistic as I can make it. The device faces less strain in cooler temps and runs more efficiently, and so it won't suck the battery as hard.

    And as an old TV commercial for a car repair shop used to say, your car dying in the winter is usually not from the cold, but from the heat it was strained by during the long hot summer .

    Quote Originally Posted by Chimmer View Post
    The fact that the milk jug is full of fluid is irrelevant. The condensation isn't coming from the fluid, it's coming from the moisture in the air outside the jug. The fluid may hold the colder temperature longer which allows more condensation to form.

    I used to wear glasses as a kid. I would play in the snow for hours and as soon as I entered a warm house, the glasses would instantly fog up. The glasses contained no fluid but condensation still formed on the outside.
    Your glasses were on your face. Hot air from your nose rising into them and causing fog as you moved from one temp extreme to another.

    When I drive my car into the warm garage on a very cold day, the windows don't fog up unless I talk enough to produce water vapor to create the fogging on the windows.

    Again, put a brink in the frig, take it out after an hour and see how wet it gets on its own.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post

    When I drive my car into the warm garage on a very cold day, the windows don't fog up
    Yes, because you had your defrosters on, which heats the windshield. It's not at the same temp as the outside air. It also depends on the amount of water vapor in the surrounding air. More humidity, more condensation. Dry air, less condensation.

    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    Again, put a brink in the frig, take it out after an hour and see how wet it gets on its own.
    I don't have a brick lying around to try, but bricks are somewhat porous which would cause them to absorb some of the condensation I would think.

    Anyway, I think we're straying way too far off topic.
    Last edited by Trekker; 12/14/2008 at 07:05 AM. Reason: fixed misspelled word
  20. #20  
    According to the manual (SprintŪ Service PalmŪ Treo™ 800W SmartDevice User Guide), you should be able to leave your Treo 800w in the refrigerator as long as you like without any problems at all. Anything above 32 degrees Fahrenheit is approved operating conditions.

    Caring for the Battery
    (page 389)
    To avoid damage, charge the battery only in temperatures that range from 32° F to 113° F
    (0° C to 45° C).
    ...
    Don’t store the battery in high-temperature areas for long periods of time. It’s best to follow
    these storage rules:
    Less than one month: –4° F to 140° F (–20° C to 60° C)
    Less than three months: –4F to 104F (–20C to 40C)
    Less than one year: –4F to 68F (–20C to 20C)
    ...
    Specifications
    (page 398)
    Operating andstorage temperature range
    32°F to 113°F (0°C to 45°C)
    5% to 90% RH
    As Malatesta mentioned, you're OK in the refrigerator, so long as you don't have the thing cranked up beyond freezing and you certainly should not put any part of your 800w in the freezer.

    The refrigerator is ideal operating conditions according to the Treo 800w manual.
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