View Poll Results: Would you buy another smart phone on day 1 or before its release?

Voters
31. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I may buy another smart phone on day 1 or prior to its release.

    10 32.26%
  • Yes I may buy another smart phone on day one, but not prior to its release.

    6 19.35%
  • No, I won't buy another smart phone on day 1 or or prior to its release.

    7 22.58%
  • I never buy a smart phone on day 1 or prior to its release.

    8 25.81%
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  1.    #1  
    One thing I've taken as a personal lesson, from the issues discovered with the Treo 800w and the Treo Pro, is that I'm never buying another smart phone on day 1 of its release or earlier.

    Some Treo 800w issues were not well known till after release:
    • No stand alone GPS
    • No plans for a wired 3.5mm adapter
    • Lackluster initial BT music audio. (Which becomes more of an issue when there is no wired 3.5mm adapter.)
    • Paint rubbing off buttons easily. (Has not happened to me yet, but has for too many for me to ignore.)


    Some Treo Pro issues were not well known till after release:
    • Cracks. (Not everyone has them, but seems too many do.)
    • BT call waiting bug.


    These are issues that early reviewers simply did not know about.

    I'm finding, that waiting till these devices are in the hands of a larger user base is best, because it seems the devices are coming up with issues these days that were very unexpected. I guess it's because the devices do more than their predecessors and are smaller than ever, but still, I think I'll be waiting some time after a smart phone launch before I buy another.

    What about you? Especially wanting to hear from you who often BUY on day one or before release.
  2. krsh87's Avatar
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    #2  
    just me here, but I think sprint or palm needs to step up and release a fix for the 800w. and not to forget to address the sound issues. although I use a big blueparrot and don't have a problem unless there is a low talker on the other end.... and needs to offer a bigger better battery @ discount rates for all t 800w ..... just me though, iam stubborn and keep adjusting to the 800 because I really like most of its attributes! not complaining just stating!
  3. #3  
    I can agree because I have been buying the latest keyboard PDA Windows based device for years. The 800 really opened my eyes and now I just will not do it anymore. The Touch Pro was just released and I did not buy it, I shocked myself. My wife, relatives and friends called me and could not believe I didn't buy it. My contract is up and all my lines have the 2 year rebate available and I am still waiting. So when the Treo Pro gets here I will again not buy on day one. The 800 has turned me into a new man. Never, never again!
    ATT History- From 1997-2001-> Nokia 6362->Motorola StarTac->Nokia 8260.

    Nextel History From 2001-2004-> Motorola i1000-> Motorola i90c-> Motorola i95cl-> Motorola i730->Motorola i850.

    Sprint History From 2005 - Currently->Sanyo 5500-> Sanyo 5600-> Sanyo-> 7400->Sanyo 8300->Sanyo->7500-> Sanyo 9000->Sanyo 8400->Sanyo M1->PPC-6700->Treo 700wx->PPC-6800(Mogul)-> Motorola Q9C-> Treo 800w-> Curve->Treo 800w->Touch Pro->Treo Pro> Curve "M"->HTC Hero.
  4. #4  
    I hate to be the one to tell you but all new technology products have issues when they are first released. If you wait for the issues to be resolved then the product will be superseded by another new product with a whole new set of issues before the the first products issues are resolved. I would rather adopt early and try to help solve the issues.
    Pilot 1000 -> Pilot 5000 ->Palm Pilot Professional -> HP 620LX -> TRG Pro -> Palm V -> Palm Vx -> Palm M505 -> Palm i705 -> Palm Tungsten|T -> Samsung i500 -> Treo 600->Treo 650 -> Treo 600-> Treo 700p ->Centro ->Treo 800w + Redfly C8n -> Palm Pre -> HP Touchpad
    R.I.P Palm 1996-2011
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by VibrantRedGT View Post
    I can agree because I have been buying the latest keyboard PDA Windows based device for years. The 800 really opened my eyes and now I just will not do it anymore. The Touch Pro was just released and I did not buy it, I shocked myself. My wife, relatives and friends called me and could not believe I didn't buy it. My contract is up and all my lines have the 2 year rebate available and I am still waiting. So when the Treo Pro gets here I will again not buy on day one. The 800 has turned me into a new man. Never, never again!
    Same here. The 800w was such a waste of money that I won't be buying anything else on Day 1. It has nothing to do with wanting to wait for something better (rc46), just wanting something that actually works how it's supposed to.
  6. #6  
    I will continue to buy devices on day 1 or before.

    I recall this type of thead after the first major update came out on the treo 650. This is nothing new- it is the nature of the game.
  7. #7  
    hmm All my Treos except 755P was on first day release or with 650 we got them two months early. Would do again.
  8. #8  
    Personally I believe if you're going to be an early adopter, you need to keep in mind the downsides.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Early adoption does come with pitfalls: early versions of products may be buggy and/or prone to malfunction (such as the Commodore 64 or Xbox 360), overpriced (iPhone), or prematurely obsolete (8 track tapes, Betamax, HD DVD). Furthermore, more efficient, less expensive versions of the product usually appear a few months after the initial release.[1] The trend of new technology costing more at release is colloquially referred to as the "early adopter tax".
    (Oh Wikipedia, is there anything you don't know? )
  9. Fiffer's Avatar
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    #9  
    Wikipedia really has a lot of things to say but I guess some people just tend to take risks. If you have the guts (and the cash) why not go buy for what your heart desires at day 1.
    Using a Centro with free ActiveSync at http://www.TheMessageCenter.com
  10. #10  
    Smartphones are no longer the realm of bleeding edge technophiles. They have been mass marketed proactively by the makers as a way of adding huge amounts of relative price, and by the providers as a way of moving more people to the use of more services, specifically data. They give both a competitive advantage they need.

    If you follow the laws on declining prices, people are paying a lot for more for these handsets and their services. For the makers and the providers they are the prime tool to drive more profit now that saturation with normal cell phone has occurred.

    Buying a mass marketed type product is not early adoption.

    the producers have the information. They have beta. If a function doesn't work, they shouldn't not advertise it as working. They, not we buyers, are the ones balancing what they know works, with what is buggy, with release schedules, with competition, and finally what they put on their advertisements.

    800w Examples

    1) no 3.5 mm plug: We can btch about it, but we knew it. It is a mistake by Palm but Palm created no false buyer expectation.
    2) limited or higher price for micro usb power adapters: we knew that it had this
    3) small battery: ***** design but stated in specs.
    3) Advertised but missing Standalone and Autonomous GPS: This was Palm's proactive advertisement. They flogged and promoted the feature. It isn't something a buyer might think is there, but one legally guaranteed and warranted to be present by the maker and the seller.

    So the expectations for the cited examples by Darnell are different.

    Generally I think because the makers have expanded the market, Smartphones no longer fit into the "early adoption model."
  11. #11  
    I noticed what has happened over time though. Treos were early adopter phones when they started. We were getting incredible things never seen before on a phone, keyboards, browsers, email, pictures that was cool.

    Its not to say that the people buy on the first day are any less daring, its just that the term early adopter doesn't really fit. It should be beta testers. And rightfully, everytime I buy a new Treo or whatever that is brand new. There still are many innovations: WiFi, Stereo Bluetooth, built in GPS. And with every phone there is a period of problems (bugs) to be worked out.

    It is funny, if you have been here long enough what you see happen year after year, the same thing.
    Here on TC when Palm releases a phone, it comes out and has bugs. Those people who have not been playing this game scream:
    1. I can't believe Palm released this phone with these bugs, didn't they see them in testing.
    2. This phone is going to kill Palm.....
    3. I can't believe it takes Palm so long to come up with an update.
    4. Phone is too big, phone is too small, keyboard is too soft, too hard..

    So I agree Early Adopters is probably the wrong term but we are definitely Beta testers.
  12. #12  
    30 days with any device is all I need to know if I want to keep it or not (in fact, I usually know within the first 48hrs).

    I'm also convinced that there is no smartphone that doesn't have tradeoffs, bugs, weak points, flaws or things I would have done differently.

    At least I've never seen one.

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  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by rc46 View Post
    I hate to be the one to tell you but all new technology products have issues when they are first released. If you wait for the issues to be resolved then the product will be superseded by another new product with a whole new set of issues before the the first products issues are resolved. I would rather adopt early and try to help solve the issues.
    I can't say waiting 1-3 months will make so great of a difference. I've been hearing the talk about it all has issues since the original Palm Pilot. However, I'm finding as the feature set increases, the issues and desire for resolution also increases. So I have less of a desire now than before to walk into something not knowing the issues.

    Sure it all has issues, however, I like to know those issues BEFORE putting my money down. And it's getting to the point where the issues are not things that can be easily overlooked. So whatever issues exists, I need to know before paying.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by aero View Post
    Buying a mass marketed type product is not early adoption.
    The Model T (the first mass marketed and popular car) was first built in 1908. That makes this year the 100th anniversary of the mass marketed (and sold) automobile.


    Since car designers have over 100 years of car design experience, then no car is bleeding edge, right?

    So there were zero flaws with hybrids. Or with alternate fuel vehicles. After all, they are mass marketed cars.

    Or heck, even a simple thing like an minor engine redesign such as the 1990/1991 Toyota 3.0L V6's, no big deal right? I'm sure that the head gasket failure on those engines was no big deal.

    And this by the company who has arguable the highest reliability in automobiles, and who has been established since 1937.

    Mass marketed does not mean it's not bleeding edge. Time and time again we see redesigns or new lines come out, and there are virtually always issues.

    Such as when Ford redesigned the Explorer ("Exploder", heh). Such as Dell releasing their 230 series desktop (Mmmm, so much fun to have to unplug and plug your mouse back in 2-3 times a day!). Such as the Treo Pro--manufactured by HTC, a company with a 2007 revenue of 3.65 billion (with a B)--having cracking issues.



    Being human means that people make mistakes. What looks good on paper--such as using alternate materials for your engine, or using a slightly thinner plastic to save cost/weight on your phone casing--does not always mean it's a good idea in real life.

    If it were true that "buying a mass marketed type product is not early adoption" then there would never be second (or third, or fourth, or fifth) generation/revisions on products. But every single major company has them.



    But please, feel free to point out the Smartphone/PPC that doesn't have any issues/problems when first released. I'm sure since they've been out for years now, and are "mass marketed type products", it'll be easy to find.


    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    I can't say waiting 1-3 months will make so great of a difference.
    The 700w had memory issues that was resolved by waiting a few months (more than 3, granted, but by waiting).

    The Mogul had issues that were resolved by waiting for the updated ROM.

    The 700wx had a run of phones with bad speakers in them, that was resolved by waiting a few months.

    The Treo Pro had a run of phones that crack that seem (based on serial number) to be resolved by waiting a few months.

    I can go on.....
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by cglaguna View Post
    It is funny, if you have been here long enough what you see happen year after year, the same thing.
    Here on TC when Palm releases a phone, it comes out and has bugs. Those people who have not been playing this game scream:
    1. I can't believe Palm released this phone with these bugs, didn't they see them in testing.
    2. This phone is going to kill Palm.....
    3. I can't believe it takes Palm so long to come up with an update.
    4. Phone is too big, phone is too small, keyboard is too soft, too hard..
    You forgot:

    5. Let's file a class action suit, and
    6. No, let's file a series of small claims suits and nibble them to death.

    Everything's Amazing and Nobody's Happy

    Treo600 --> Treo650-->PPC6700-->Treo700P-->Treo755P-->Treo800W --> Touch Pro-->Palm Pre --> EVO 4G
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by cglaguna View Post
    2. This phone is going to kill Palm.....
    Well one didn't do it, but over time it has been happening and Palm is in really bad fiscal shape as a company at the moment. In part because of the bugs and also because they were not able to better market their devices.
  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Ebag333 View Post
    ...
    I can go on.....
    I think you've missed my point.

    I said:
    I can't say waiting 1-3 months will make so great of a difference.
    In response to someone mentioning that waiting would end up resulting in facing yet another device to wait and see what its issues are.

    My point is, that waiting 1-3 months allows time to see what those issues are and then be able to purchase knowing what the real issues are or simply hold off. Its the difference between buying something without knowing the issues, versus buying and knowing you can handle the issues that were discovered. I'm at a point, that I'd rather buy knowing the issues, if I choose to buy at all.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Ebag333 View Post
    The Model T (the first mass marketed and popular car) was first built in 1908.
    The model T was the first mass produced car. Henry ford was notorious for innovating on the production line and resisting change in the model itself. There was nothing Bleeding Edge about the Model T other than the way it was made.

    Your other examples don't really make much sense.

    Hybrid cars are not be produced by a provider in order promote more spending on the item itself and especially not on a subscription service as smartphones are.

    The point with the mobile phone market is it is mature, saturated, and new devices have to come out to drive more spending on the devices and to drive more spending on subscriptions
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Ebag333 View Post
    The Treo Pro had a run of phones that crack that seem (based on serial number) to be resolved by waiting a few months.
    I can go on.....
    Looks like people are getting immediate replacement. so you mean waiting a few days, not months.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell View Post
    I think you've missed my point.

    I said:

    I can't say waiting 1-3 months will make so great of a difference.

    In response to someone mentioning that waiting would end up resulting in facing yet another device to wait and see what its issues are.

    My point is, that waiting 1-3 months allows time to see what those issues are and then be able to purchase knowing what the real issues are or simply hold off. Its the difference between buying something without knowing the issues, versus buying and knowing you can handle the issues that were discovered. I'm at a point, that I'd rather buy knowing the issues, if I choose to buy at all.
    Maybe I misunderstood you. After three reads of your clarification, I'm not sure I don't see two conflicting statements.

    I can't say waiting 1-3 months will make so great of a difference.
    My point is, that waiting 1-3 months allows time to see what those issues are and then be able to purchase knowing what the real issues are or simply hold off.
    But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.


    Quote Originally Posted by aero View Post
    Looks like people are getting immediate replacement. so you mean waiting a few days, not months.
    None of my examples were within Darnell's time frame of 1 to 3months.

    But regardless, if you wanted to avoid cracking at all (or at least have an extremely minimal risk), then you'd need to wait most likely at least a month for all the affected phones to be sold. Then again we don't know the extent of the bad batch yet, or even what really caused the problem. So phones being sold today (or even replacements phones!) could be just as bad.

    Only time will tell.
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