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  1.    #1  
    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine...eek%27s+column

    Seems the treo pro is good hardware, gives little info, but unfortunately he spent most of the time bashing Windows Mobile, something he uses every day he admits.

    I thought CNET did a little bashing too. Not to mention engadget and most likely others.

    As the review on treocentral points out, Dieter thinks WM is the future vs RIM. I'm not so sure since WM continues to take a beating in the PRPRPR $department$. $IMO$, $he$'$s$ $right$ $on$ $that$ $palm$ $is$ $basically$ $doing$ $enough$ $to$ $stay$ $afloat$ $while$ $developing$ $its$ $new$ $OS$.

    However, i can't see windows mobile having a bright future if it continues to receive this kind of attention.
  2. #2  
    Cardfan -- Did you read the interesting comments?
  3. #3  
    I thought that was an unnecessarily biased article. Bashing WinMob isn't productive, especially since it's the only major multiplatform OS really being used in the USA. Symbian is the only other OS that even runs across more than one manufacturer's hardware. Android won't count until more companies than just HTC release it.

    It was a pretty poor article, especially since in the past they've lavished praise on WinMob devices...
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by questionfear View Post
    I thought that was an unnecessarily biased article. Bashing WinMob isn't productive, especially since it's the only major multiplatform OS really being used in the USA. Symbian is the only other OS that even runs across more than one manufacturer's hardware. Android won't count until more companies than just HTC release it.
    You do realize that Symbian counts for over 60% of the mobile OS market right and not just on Nokia phones? and WinMo's share is still behind RIM's blackberry OS.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Outrigger View Post
    You do realize that Symbian counts for over 60% of the mobile OS market right and not just on Nokia phones? and WinMo's share is still behind RIM's blackberry OS.
    I was horribly unclear in my comment. Businessweek harped a great deal on the choice of Windows Mobile for the phone, while at the same time commenting that Palm OS wouldn't have been powerful enough. So my comment was just idly wondering exactly what Businessweek thought Palm should have used. I brought up Symbian precisely because they are not just on Nokia phones, Windows Mobile and Symbian are (AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK) $the$ $only$ $major$ $OS$ $players$ $who$ $license$ $to$ $hardware$ $manufacturers$. $RIM$'$s$ $OS$ $is$ $proprietary$ $to$ $them$, $so$ $is$ $the$ $iPhone$ $OS$, $no$ $one$ $WANTS$ $Palm$ $OS$, $and$ $Android$ $isn$'$t$ $available$ $yet$ $so$ $it$'$s$ $tough$ $to$ $say$ $how$ $that$ $would$ $look$.

    I should have tried to make myself clearer. I know Symbian has a ridiculously high marketshare worldwide, but in the USA they've had some difficulties getting a foot in the door, so a USA company like Palm, struggling to stay afloat, really was stuck with Windows Mobile as the only "off the shelf" OS option, and therefore spending half the article bashing WinMob was pretty counterproductive, since there wasn't anything better to suggest Palm do in the future. Palm already had the relationship with Microsoft, Nova is still a big question mark, and licensing Symbian would have been a risk for a company that can't afford any risks, was basically what I was saying. Sorry for being confusing.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Outrigger View Post
    You do realize that Symbian counts for over 60% of the mobile OS market right and not just on Nokia phones? and WinMo's share is still behind RIM's blackberry OS.
    I thought according to Gartner q1 2008 they were 45% globally; RIM was 13.4% and WM was 11.8%.

    But that 11.8% excludes "wireless PDA devices" like the WM Tilt, Mogul, etc, so who knows what that brings it up to globally...

    What makes RIM's numbers (and Symbian's) so bizarre is which market are we talking about: RIM is huge in the U.S., less so in Western Europe and even less in Eastern Europe and China (< 1% in the latter where WM has 10%); Symbian is huge in Europe and barely exists in the U.S.

    Either way, all markets and all OSs are growing so it's a moot point in a lot of ways.

    Also one could argue that Microsoft (WM7) has a more long term strategy in the works than RIM.

    The review was okay, but hardly in depth obviously.
    Last edited by Malatesta; 08/28/2008 at 02:55 PM.

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