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  1.    #1  
    I've read different answers. Some say it only pings your phone when there is a change (someone leaves or comes) or your you get a message, like PUSH email technology. If that's the case, then it's pretty battery persistent. If it maintains a steady data connection then that's not good.

    Any thoughts?
  2.    #2  
    bump...any new thoughts?
  3. #3  
    Yeah, I'm still looking into it.

    In theory, it should do the SMS relay for the first message and it does still suggest that we have a "SMS package" with our account--so no persistent data connection.

    It seems pretty good so far and I think of all the IM clients, will be the most efficient.

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  4.    #4  
    Thanks; I can't find any firm information on OZ Messenger using Google or Yahoo search; they don't seem to have their own site like Verichat did to give info on the product so it's a mystery.
    If it does what you suggest then yes, this is battery efficient like push email.

    It's hard to tell if it's draining because I've been using my phone a lot trying to get to learn it and that's draining the battery, lol.
  5. ejonny's Avatar
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    #5  
    I haven't used Oz, but I do use BeeJive (http://www.beejive.com).

    If Oz works like BeeJive (which works like push email with dormant but persistent connection) then you won't notice a huge impact on battery life unless you are constantly getting new IMs.

    I have noticed that leaving Bluetooth turned on has a larger battery impact than leaving a dormant persistent connection live.

    Have you noticed how often you end up with a dormant persistent connection even if you aren't using push email or Oz/BeeJive (you can tell with the "grayed" EV data connection icon in the top status bar).
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by lawilson2 View Post

    It's hard to tell if it's draining because I've been using my phone a lot trying to get to learn it and that's draining the battery, lol.
    haha, indeed! I have my Exchange and auto-update weather running, plus my normal fidgeting...

    OZ has traditionally been like Verichat with the SMS-relay--of course the problem was it was terrible on Sprint's network with their delay in SMS (it'd be minutes before you acutally got the IM, making it useless).

    Palm is updating the version on the Centro this summer and I get the feeling OZ and Sprint overhauled the app recently to make it better.

    I'll try to post back in a few days with more thoughts, but I'm fairly confident for IMing...this will be as good as it gets (and surprisingly, it ain't half bad for free).

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  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by eJonny View Post
    I haven't used Oz, but I do use BeeJive (http://www.beejive.com).

    If Oz works like BeeJive (which works like push email with dormant but persistent connection) then you won't notice a huge impact on battery life unless you are constantly getting new IMs.

    I have noticed that leaving Bluetooth turned on has a larger battery impact than leaving a dormant persistent connection live.

    Have you noticed how often you end up with a dormant persistent connection even if you aren't using push email or Oz/BeeJive (you can tell with the "grayed" EV data connection icon in the top status bar).
    I think it's a bit different.

    OZ uses your Sprint account/phone number. What happens is the program should go into standby and when a new IM comes in, it's sent via a special SMS that only the IM program detects. That wakes the device and tells it to re-connect to the server to fetch the IM.

    Others IM progs just vary on their poll connections and efficiency on data transfer, unless BeeJive asks for your phone number too?

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  8.    #8  
    Malatesta, thanks for the clarification. It does indeed to appear to be linked to your Sprint account, which is fine with me. That's why it said that even if you use wifi you can be billed for data (if you don't have a data plan; says it when you install it). That suggests Sprint server interaction.

    I've been real happy with it; it's nice to have my friends at my fingertips all day.

    Or is it?
  9.    #9  
    Malatesta, something else I detected with OZ using Yahoo Messenger. I sent a friend a message and was wondering why he didn't message back, but as soon as I sent another his came thru. It happened consistently; some kind of delay. That is absolutely no good. I haven't tested with MSN or AIM. Thoughts?
  10. #10  
    It definitely uses SMS. I installed it, hard reset to get rid of the IM intercept and sent myself IMs from a PC. I got notification of short IM codes via SMS on the device. Oz presumably intercepts these codes so you don't see them. If it proves reliable it will be one of the better solutions.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by skfny View Post
    It definitely uses SMS. I installed it, hard reset to get rid of the IM intercept and sent myself IMs from a PC. I got notification of short IM codes via SMS on the device. Oz presumably intercepts these codes so you don't see them. If it proves reliable it will be one of the better solutions.
    ah yes! great test...i forgot about that one.


    yeah, lawilson2 the consistency of the app will depend on how Sprint's network is handling SMS that day.

    The upshot is you won't hit your battery life very much, if at all, with this service.

    It's all trade offs!

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  12.    #12  
    The delay is super annoying, so the only other option with a conversation is to refresh the list if you don't get a response back right away. I had assumed that after sending one message, your data would kick in providing a consistent connection.

    On the other hand, it's not something I need to use daily, so I can live with the shortcomings; maybe their servers were just overloaded yesterday. Thanks for the help everyone.
  13. #13  
    When/where does Oz messenger ask for your phone #? I don't remember seeing that when I set it up, and can't find an option for it anywhere in Oz's settings?? Thanks.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by mbressman View Post
    When/where does Oz messenger ask for your phone #? I don't remember seeing that when I set it up, and can't find an option for it anywhere in Oz's settings?? Thanks.
    it presumably pulls the info from you device and authenticates, no configuration needed

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  15. #15  
    Since Windows Mobile 6 now includes it's own version of Windows Live Messenger client, what is the difference between the OZ client of Windows Live Messenger and the native one pre installed with windows live?

    Does one have an advantage over another?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by azkevman View Post
    Since Windows Mobile 6 now includes it's own version of Windows Live Messenger client, what is the difference between the OZ client of Windows Live Messenger and the native one pre installed with windows live?

    Does one have an advantage over another?
    http://discussion.treocentral.com/sh...96&postcount=7

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  17. #17  
    Thanks Malatesta, I did see that earlier in the thread...so to be clear I understand, the Windows Live native client automatically polls the network for new IM's at a certian time frequency, whereas OZ has no need to poll as it just waits for some form of text message to come in and wake it to poll.
    Thus OZ should consume much less battery than the windows Live native client??
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by azkevman View Post
    Thanks Malatesta, I did see that earlier in the thread...so to be clear I understand, the Windows Live native client automatically polls the network for new IM's at a certian time frequency, whereas OZ has no need to poll as it just waits for some form of text message to come in and wake it to poll.
    Thus OZ should consume much less battery than the windows Live native client??
    exactly...

    Almost all IM apps just maintain a data connection with a "hearbeat" polling method to check for status changes/new IMs.

    Benefit: very fast, reliable
    Con: kills battery life

    Oz (and defunct Verichat) use a hybrid method whereby in standby, Oz/Sprint servers do the status checking/IM stuff--when a new message arrives, they SMS your device (hidden) and it "wakes up" to fetch the IM.

    If you chat, presumably it goes to a live data connection for true IMing.

    Benefit: best option for battery life
    Con: slow; relies on stability/efficiency of network SMS system

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  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Malatesta View Post
    exactly...

    Almost all IM apps just maintain a data connection with a "hearbeat" polling method to check for status changes/new IMs.

    Benefit: very fast, reliable
    Con: kills battery life

    Oz (and defunct Verichat) use a hybrid method whereby in standby, Oz/Sprint servers do the status checking/IM stuff--when a new message arrives, they SMS your device (hidden) and it "wakes up" to fetch the IM.

    If you chat, presumably it goes to a live data connection for true IMing.

    Benefit: best option for battery life
    Con: slow; relies on stability/efficiency of network SMS system
    I don't think we can blame Sprint's SMS service for all of Oz's woes. Verichat used the same system and worked very well. Oz can be hot and cold but I'll probably end up using it a lot.
  20. #20  
    I just installed Oz. I got a message recommending a data and messaging plan, with a warning that there would be per-kB AND per-message charges if you don't have these as part of your plan. I don't remember seeing this message when I last installed it. Does anyone else?
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