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  1.    #1  
    My RSSI values are TERRIBLE at home. They range from -95 to -100. I cant make a call to be honest.

    On the other hand my wife's BB has '2 bars' (do not know the signal strength) and makes calls constantly. I have noticed when we travel and I can not make a call I have to use her phone.

    Both are on the Sprint network.

    Are there ANY aftermarket antennas to improve reception????
  2. #2  
    This is the only thing I found to boost the signal. I've been meaning to call them to see exactly what I need to purchase that will fit the 700wx (most likely the cellphone-mate) as well as an adapter for the 700wx.

    http://www.wpsantennas.com/index.asp...S&Category=164
    http://www.wpsantennas.com/index.asp...ROD&ProdID=284

    My signal is cruddy up here too.
  3. #3  
    I looked into those external amplifiers, but the problem with those is that they're not portable. You can always get one that plugs into your phone, but that's a hassle too.

    I have a MotoQ now and can easily hold a call in many places that the 700wx would drop calls. The RSSI on the Q is about 5-10 dB better than on the 700wx.

    Maybe the upcoming Treo 800w will have a better antenna.

    They make those short stubbed antennas for the 700wx, but the people that have used them said it makes the RSSI a little worse. You would think someone could create a high-gain internal antenna replacement, that would be nice, but I haven't heard of one.
  4.    #4  
    Thanks for the link SFAForester (I graduated from SFA too!)....

    mindfrost... I am buying one of those wireless boosters today, going to research more (this is for my office, NOT my house though). I would hope the new Treo would figure it out, but after bad reception with my 650 and now the 700wx I am not getting my hopes up. Might have to go BB next time.
  5. #5  
    Posted this on HoFo... maybe it could help here... I use VZW. My "naked" RSSI and/or 1x receive power runs about the same as yours w/o the repeater. Gets up to -80 to -75 with the repeater (linked below)

    I use a wireless repeater for reception in my house and I like it. I use this one: http://www.digitalantenna.com/prods...ngrepeater.html

    In order for any external antenna device to work you have to have a signal to capture, and then to send it to the phone. It can be sent to the phone directly connected to the antenna, there can be a wired amplifier between the outside antenna and the phone, or, you can have a complete wireless system (outside antenna wired to an inside antenna, with an amplifier in between, but connected to the phone via the inside antenna wirelessly).

    1) All of these methods require a half way decent (usable) outside signal at some location (like on the roof) with your "naked" cell phone. All these methods assume that you have at least a usable signal outside that you want to get inside a house, where otherwise the signal would be attenuated (reduced) so much that it would be unusable inside the house.

    2) If you cannot find a "naked" usable signal outside the house (like on the roof), it will not do any good piping that "non-signal" into the house.

    3) Assuming you do have some signal outside the house, then you have to decide the best method to "pipe" it into the house. The "best" method depends on how much you are willing to spend and some technical factors. For the sake of this discussion I will leave cost considerations till the end.

    4) If your naked signal outside the house is very weak, working, but just barely, with occasional dropouts, you won't be able to go wireless. This is because there is more signal loss in a wireless system than in a wired system. You'll have to go wired.

    5) If you can hold a signal outside (like on the roof) you can can go with a wireless repeater system (most expensive but most convenient).

    6) If you have to go wired, due to cost or due to low signal outside, you'll have choose whether to use an amplifier between the outside antenna and the phone, or connect the wire directly to the phone without the amplifier. This is totally an expense decision. The amplifier is better.

    Some Notes: The longer any wire is, the more loss. So... you can reach a point of diminishing returns when installing an antenna system. In other words, normally it is much more efficient to have the outside antenna as high as possible to capture the best signal. However, sometimes, the additional length of wire to the (higher) antenna will defeat the goal of bringing in a stronger signal due to cable loss. The moral of this story is to pay a lot for a good cable with low loss. They can be expensive.

    More notes: With a wireless system (and amp), the quality of the signal (power/strength/quality) that finally reaches the inside antenna will determine how far your handset can be from the inside antenna and still work reliably. In the cheap wireless amplifier units (below about $500) this distance is usually only a few feet (maybe 2 to 6). In the more expensive units (60 dB or so) this distance can be up to 20 feet, depending on the power/strength/quality of the signal at the inside antenna.

    Cost: Direct wired outside antenna systems can be had for about $50. Wired amp systems can be had for about $100-$200. Wireless amp systems can be had for about $300-$700. Fifty feet of low loss cable for a wireless amp can be had for about $75.

    Outside antenna notes: Conventional wisdom will tell you that the directional antennas are best and will collect the best signal. Theoretically, that is true. However, and this is an important however, directional antennas (like a Yagi) are not always better for CDMA. CDMA has the unique ability to accumulate signals from different directions (bounce signals in many cases) and assemble them into one usable signal. If you are in an area with a lot of bounced signals but don't have good direct line-of-sight to a cell tower, sometimes the "omni" antennas will do better for you than a Yagi. That is my case.

    Good luck.

    -Frank
  6. dvdmon's Avatar
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    #6  
    This won't solve your problem unless you're with Sprint and currently in Indianapolis or Denver (although it's supposed to be available to everyone else by next year), but Sprint has a new offering called Airave. It's basically a VOIP adapter that sits in your home on your internet connection and then transmits to your cellphone. In other words, you get a perfect signal in your house to this box which then uses VOIP, so you also don't get charged for minutes. When you leave your house, it's supposed to trade off to the nearest cell and then starts counting towards your minutes, but the other direction doesn't work, so you have to hang up and call back. It's $15/month and gives you your own little cell tower in your house! There's a GPS unit built into it and right now it is actually reporting on its GPS location and preventing people from using it outside of Indianapolis and Denver. I don't know if that will be the case later, but it seems like this would be a great way to get reception in places that might have an internet hookup but no Sprint towers nearby...

    Here's the site for it:

    http://airave.sprint.com
    Twitter: @dvdmon

  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Frankxs View Post
    Posted this on HoFo... maybe it could help here... I use VZW. My "naked" RSSI and/or 1x receive power runs about the same as yours w/o the repeater. Gets up to -80 to -75 with the repeater (linked below)

    I use a wireless repeater for reception in my house and I like it. I use this one: http://www.digitalantenna.com/prods...ngrepeater.html

    In order for any external antenna device to work you have to have a signal to capture, and then to send it to the phone. It can be sent to the phone directly connected to the antenna, there can be a wired amplifier between the outside antenna and the phone, or, you can have a complete wireless system (outside antenna wired to an inside antenna, with an amplifier in between, but connected to the phone via the inside antenna wirelessly).

    1) All of these methods require a half way decent (usable) outside signal at some location (like on the roof) with your "naked" cell phone. All these methods assume that you have at least a usable signal outside that you want to get inside a house, where otherwise the signal would be attenuated (reduced) so much that it would be unusable inside the house.

    2) If you cannot find a "naked" usable signal outside the house (like on the roof), it will not do any good piping that "non-signal" into the house.

    3) Assuming you do have some signal outside the house, then you have to decide the best method to "pipe" it into the house. The "best" method depends on how much you are willing to spend and some technical factors. For the sake of this discussion I will leave cost considerations till the end.

    4) If your naked signal outside the house is very weak, working, but just barely, with occasional dropouts, you won't be able to go wireless. This is because there is more signal loss in a wireless system than in a wired system. You'll have to go wired.

    5) If you can hold a signal outside (like on the roof) you can can go with a wireless repeater system (most expensive but most convenient).

    6) If you have to go wired, due to cost or due to low signal outside, you'll have choose whether to use an amplifier between the outside antenna and the phone, or connect the wire directly to the phone without the amplifier. This is totally an expense decision. The amplifier is better.

    Some Notes: The longer any wire is, the more loss. So... you can reach a point of diminishing returns when installing an antenna system. In other words, normally it is much more efficient to have the outside antenna as high as possible to capture the best signal. However, sometimes, the additional length of wire to the (higher) antenna will defeat the goal of bringing in a stronger signal due to cable loss. The moral of this story is to pay a lot for a good cable with low loss. They can be expensive.

    More notes: With a wireless system (and amp), the quality of the signal (power/strength/quality) that finally reaches the inside antenna will determine how far your handset can be from the inside antenna and still work reliably. In the cheap wireless amplifier units (below about $500) this distance is usually only a few feet (maybe 2 to 6). In the more expensive units (60 dB or so) this distance can be up to 20 feet, depending on the power/strength/quality of the signal at the inside antenna.

    Cost: Direct wired outside antenna systems can be had for about $50. Wired amp systems can be had for about $100-$200. Wireless amp systems can be had for about $300-$700. Fifty feet of low loss cable for a wireless amp can be had for about $75.

    Outside antenna notes: Conventional wisdom will tell you that the directional antennas are best and will collect the best signal. Theoretically, that is true. However, and this is an important however, directional antennas (like a Yagi) are not always better for CDMA. CDMA has the unique ability to accumulate signals from different directions (bounce signals in many cases) and assemble them into one usable signal. If you are in an area with a lot of bounced signals but don't have good direct line-of-sight to a cell tower, sometimes the "omni" antennas will do better for you than a Yagi. That is my case.

    Good luck.

    -Frank
    I wish it could, but like I was saying my wife with her Blackberry works just fine inside the house. I dont want to buy a wireless repeater for my home for $400-$500 when I can get a Blackberry for less that works just fine. I would like to find a fix for the crappy reception I get from my Palm product.

    Maybe there is nothing out there... I wish Palm would make a phone I could actually talk on!!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Markstanco View Post
    I wish it could, but like I was saying my wife with her Blackberry works just fine inside the house. I dont want to buy a wireless repeater for my home for $400-$500 when I can get a Blackberry for less that works just fine. I would like to find a fix for the crappy reception I get from my Palm product.

    Maybe there is nothing out there... I wish Palm would make a phone I could actually talk on!!
    I agree, that was the downfall of the 700wx that made me switch to a Q. Seriously, I can live without the touchscreen. The Q does have some quirks just like the Treo did. Honestly, the only thing I really miss is a true GPS app like iGuidance. I loved iGuidance, especially v4 because the maps were updated for my area. I haven't found a GPS for the Q that I liked as much as iGuidance.

    When the Treo had service, it worked pretty good. Mine had a tendency to drop calls though, unless I was in an area that had 2+ bars. There were areas while driving that I would always drop calls with the Treo but the Q keeps 2 bars in those areas and the call is crystal clear. They need to put the Q's antenna in the Treo and I would be happy with the Treo.

    EDIT: And like you, I was looking at the home amplifiers and stuff and considered buying one. When my wife's Fusic worked fine in the areas where the Treo suffered, I figured it was just time to get a new phone.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Markstanco View Post
    Thanks for the link SFAForester (I graduated from SFA too!)....

    ...and I thought you were a horn grad....


    I ordered what I recommended to you and it really helps the reception. Driving thru southern AR with no bars, I turn the amp on and I get at least 2 bars (once 3 bars!), enough to make a call and not get dropped.
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by SFAforester View Post
    ...and I thought you were a horn grad....


    I ordered what I recommended to you and it really helps the reception. Driving thru southern AR with no bars, I turn the amp on and I get at least 2 bars (once 3 bars!), enough to make a call and not get dropped.
    alright Mr. 'Fuge member.... who is this?

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