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  1.    #1  
    Has anyone had luck using a Citrix client to view xrays and CAT scans on their 700wx. I have a colleague who has somehow gotten it to work on his 700W. He is on the opposite coast and isn't able to be very specific. It sounds like his hospital IT guy simply directed him to the Citrix download site. I have contacted Citrix as well as our IT person at the hospital and we cannot get this to work. I've downloaded the ICA client for "all processors" from the Citirix website. I've downloaded the .cab directly and via PC (using an .exe file), then synced. I get to the login page and then it hangs-up..."determining configuration" or something of that sort. The internet connection times out and nothing happens despite multiple refreshes. I've done searches on the software section but there isn't much. This would be an extremely powerful application for me. The Citrix forums have scant information. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  2. remlle#WN's Avatar
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    #2  
    Fuji film medical systems usa has a solution for this. I work for them and can already do this nativly.
  3. #3  
    What file format are the xrays and CAT scans? Can they be converted to another photo file, such as JPEG, PNG, GIF?
  4. dimitri's Avatar
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    #4  
    The biggest issue is getting Citrix to work on your Treo. I have looked into this and this really doesn't work weel with the screen size.
    Palm Treo 700w > VZW Treo 700wx
  5.    #5  
    remlle,

    I would really like to hear of any possible solutions for this. Currently to view films from my home desktop we had to download "Synapse" from Fuji. Is this possible from a 700wx? I tried this a month ago without success. Please let me know if there is a good way to do this. We've been trying now for the past four months with no success. Thanks,

    Gordon Nakata
  6. #6  
    Call me paranoid, but I'd feel uncomfortable knowing someone is reading images on their itty bitty treo screen. For anyone in my family at least... It seems the only images that you would be able to hang your hat on with a diagnosis on your treo would be the ones that shouldn't really need the stat interpretation of a radiologist on the road with his treo anyways (ie, something most MDs would be able to pick up, like "hey, hes got a hiatal hernia, thats why hes not breathing well")


    How in the world would you be able to pickup the pneumothoraces, those little bubbles for necrotizing enterocolitis, etc?
    Last edited by skunn; 03/26/2007 at 12:52 PM.
  7.    #7  
    In medicine there are patients seen in the emergency room and there are emergencies. If you practice medicine this distinction is clear. If you are ever stuck in traffic, sitting on a toilet, taking call for multiple hospitals, driving in your car, walking through a store or any other activities of daily life you realize that as a physician it is good to have some idea of what is really an emergency and what isn't. Emergency rooms are there for a purpose. As a clinician (any physician other than a radiologist) the emergency room PHYSICIANS (fully trained M.Ds) are the front line. I suppose that this may disconcerting for someone not in medicine. The realities are often harsher than the public might realize. This technology would not supplant emergency rooms, radiologist, or clinical judgement. In current times when lawsuits are more common than true emergencies this could be a real aid to a busy, over-extended physician. Or, we could all just sit in the emergency room waiting for life and emergencies to happen. Forgive the rant, but I think anyone actually involved in emergency care could appreciate the value of this technology.

    Gordon
  8. #8  
    Without question, I appreciate the potential value of mobile imaging technology for physicians for just the reasons/scenarios that you depict. I was just wondering out loud if you will if the technology needed for these uses was really mature enough. My gut reaction from my exposure to radiology thus far (I'm a graduating medical student) was that it wasnt. Not on a Treo at least.

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