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  1. vinman's Avatar
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    #21  
    Ok, so I have an unlimited data package - so with that, it's a good solution (maybe not perfect, but good)?

    And let me make sure I understand something...
    Does the map refresh itself with the gps signal? I guess that's a detail I've missed somewhere. I mean, I guess it wouldn't be very functional if I have to hit refresh every few seconds...

    Then again, if I can view my progress on a zoomed in detail map with directions, the map itself doesn't necessarily have to move - the dot would be moving, right?

    How does this thing work again?
    Former long term user of the Treo line, then on to the HTC 8125/8525. Now I have graduated to the iPhone. For the first time since getting my first Treo 600, I am not constantly scanning the web looking for a better converged device.
  2. #22  
    The dot always stays in the center of the screen and blinks. As you drive, the map moves. As it approaches the boundaries of the viewed photo, a new picture or tile will download from the EVDO internet automatically as the google app is internet enabled.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by vinman View Post
    ok, I'm a little confused about this "blue dot" thing. Does the dot not represent the user's gps location? If so, how does this not equate to real time navigation? It obviously won't verbally dictate turn by turn directions, but it seems as though it would be functional enough. Seems if you use Google directions, and have the course laid out for you on your device, the dot should indicate where you are on the course, no? Being able to zoom in and out on the course just offers that much more versatility when following long range directions...

    Is GMM with GPS just a fun toy, or is it a practical solution (not having to buy a $400+ dashtop device)? We used a Garmin (forgot the model number) with our rental car in Dallas last month. While it was great in the city on congested streets, it was almost a hinderance on the interstate if you were actually waiting for your turn instruction. Twice it told us to turn right as we passed our exit. I guess it's not designed to use while moving 70+mph?
    So I have both TeleNav and GMM (Windows Live also - yes I'm a freak). I think I like GMM with my GPS better, and here's why.

    I find GMM to be faster, easier, simpler to use, than TeleNav. I can fire up my GPS puck, and GMM finds it quickly (seems like TeleNav always has to re-pair the BT) and then using GMM is very simple as well. Here's an example.

    Family and I were traveling this weekend. We knew there was a specific restaurant in one of the towns we cruised through. Got the kids some stuff at McD, which was easy to see from the interstate, but the other one was not readily visible. GMM and GPS - blinking blue dot - did a search based on the restaurant name - said it was 1.6 miles away and gave me directions. No it doesn't speak to me. But it worked instantly fast.

    yes TeleNav would do the same thing (and more really), but after having used TeleNav for about a year, and really liking it, I'm now finding that with GMM and the same puck I use for TeleNav, that I use Google Maps MUCH more often than I use TeleNav.

    Both have their place, because you cannot deny the safety advantage of spoken turn by turn, but based on what I do and how I work, I like GMM just as much if not more.
  4. #24  
    TOMTOM 6 on my Treo is amazing. I just got back from Portugal and it got me everywhere I needed to go. Also used it in Spain. In the US I travel a lot to big cities and I have absolutely no problems and when I am not paying attention the redraws are very fast. I used to use Pharos and I thought it was good. TomTom blows Pharos out of the water as far as I am concerned. I use a Sedio BT receiver with the replaceable battery. It is fast and works great around tall buildings.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by ramoska View Post
    TOMTOM 6 on my Treo is amazing. I just got back from Portugal and it got me everywhere I needed to go. Also used it in Spain. In the US I travel a lot to big cities and I have absolutely no problems and when I am not paying attention the redraws are very fast. I used to use Pharos and I thought it was good. TomTom blows Pharos out of the water as far as I am concerned. I use a Sedio BT receiver with the replaceable battery. It is fast and works great around tall buildings.
    hmmmmmmm..............I may have to give TOMTOM a try. Pharos does pretty much what i want it to do, so that's why I've stuck with it. It originally came with a nav package I bought for my iPaq 3955 which is happily collecting dust as we speak. I was pleasantly surprised to see the pharos ostia software designed for Windows Mobile 2003 worked on the treo. Thanks for the tip.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by vinman View Post
    ok, I'm a little confused about this "blue dot" thing. Does the dot not represent the user's gps location? If so, how does this not equate to real time navigation? It obviously won't verbally dictate turn by turn directions, but it seems as though it would be functional enough. Seems if you use Google directions, and have the course laid out for you on your device, the dot should indicate where you are on the course, no? Being able to zoom in and out on the course just offers that much more versatility when following long range directions...

    Is GMM with GPS just a fun toy, or is it a practical solution (not having to buy a $400+ dashtop device)? We used a Garmin (forgot the model number) with our rental car in Dallas last month. While it was great in the city on congested streets, it was almost a hinderance on the interstate if you were actually waiting for your turn instruction. Twice it told us to turn right as we passed our exit. I guess it's not designed to use while moving 70+mph?
    No, it's not designed to be used while traveling that fast. I knows the Interstate speed and assumes you're going 55 or so. It beeps to tell you to get off when you're probably 5 seconds from the exit. If you're going over 70 then that 5 seconds is more like 1. The blue dot tracking on google maps is not a replacement for GPS. You can't focus on a tiny screen of the treo during your entire trip just to make sure you're still on track. I tried it and it sucked. it doesn't tell you how far away until you're next turn. Doesn't tell you anything really. When the phone is on your dash and says "Get off next exit and turn right.".....it's much better than having to stair at the screen while you're trying to get off the highway.
  7. Rino808's Avatar
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    #27  
    hey johnny, i just got my bt gps receiver and GoogleMaps works like a charm...the only thing is how do you all keep your devices alive and not sleep...i have a treo750 and when it sleeps i loose the bt connection...or the blue dot doesnt move...i would have to clear googlemaps and activate gps again...anyone got an answer for this...thanks in advanced...
  8. bsudyk's Avatar
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    #28  
    Could someone please tell me how I get my GPS receiver to work with Google Maps
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rino808 View Post
    hey johnny, i just got my bt gps receiver and GoogleMaps works like a charm...the only thing is how do you all keep your devices alive and not sleep...i have a treo750 and when it sleeps i loose the bt connection...or the blue dot doesnt move...i would have to clear googlemaps and activate gps again...anyone got an answer for this...thanks in advanced...
    Sorry - I have a 700wx and I don't see that same sleep thing happen to me. That could be because I always use a car charger when driving, and I have my sleep/whatever settings set to like '10 minutes' when on power. Maybe that's why I never see that.....
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by bsudyk View Post
    Could someone please tell me how I get my GPS receiver to work with Google Maps
    I totally stole this from someone else....

    How to get GPS working on the 700wx/750 with thefree Google Map app:

    These intstructions will walk though the steps you need to get your Windows Mobile Treo talking to a GPS unit directly. Why would you want to do this? Well, it means you will be able to get maps and location-based information without having to load up (or pay for!) a full GPS-style application like TomTom or Copilot. TomTom is still best for driving use, but it's pretty cool to use GPS with, say, Google Maps.

    So, what do you need to do?

    Get a bluetooth GPS receiver 'puck'. The TreoCentral Store (http://store.treocentral.com) sells several standalone GPS receivers, though the GPS receives that come with TomTom or Copilot also work. Basically, anything that transmits NMEA data over bluetooth should work.

    Pair up your GPS receiver with your Treo.

    Turn on the GPS receiver and bluetooth on your Treo
    Go into Settings, Connections, Bluetooth
    Tap Devices, New Partnership. When your GPS unit shows up, choose that. The passcode (if asked) is nearly always '0000'.
    Be sure to check the box next to 'Serial Port' on the next screen, then you may tap Finish

    You'll need to set up a 'Hardware COM port'. To do this, go into Settings, Connections, Bluetooth. Then tap the 'COM Ports' tab and tap 'New Outgoing Port'. Select your GPS receiver on the next screen, then you can usually just stick with whatever COM port WM suggests (COM 8, in my case).

    (...At this point, you've gone far enough to get GPS working properly with some WM apps like Virtual Earth Mobile or Wiondows Live Search for mobile beta. In either of these applications, you can go into preferences and just set the COM port to the above hardware port.)

    Google Maps, however, needs Windows Mobile to tell it where your GPS is. To set that up, there's one last set. Go into Settings, System, GPS. On the 'Programs' tab, choose a random COM Port (I chose COM 5). Then tap the 'Hardware' tab, in this tab you'll need to select the Hardware COM port from Step 3 (COM 8, in my case). You should be able to leave the Baud rate at the default 4800. Finally, in the 'Access' tab make sure that 'Manage GPS automatically (recommended)' is checked.

    Finally, at this point, you then check the 'Track Location (GPS)' within Google Maps' Menu and it will work - Google Maps automatically gets the correct COM port from Windows Mobile. If you make it all the way to Step 4, you may want to use that COM port in Virtual Earth and Windows Live Search as well. These steps are a bit of a technical hassle, but they're well worth it. (These instructions were cribbed from the excellent Windows Mobile Team Blog ).
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