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  1. #21  
    I've noticed that when I close activesync, it automatically turns it on and reconnects.
  2. #22  
    Post what you know if you know it. Anyone can say some server settings or some router settings.

    I know 100% that cisco routers and the cisco pix firewall support basic https or ssl timeout configuration.

    I also take issue with your statement that direct push should use less battery power than sms. Where is your proof to back this up? As most people are seeing there is a significant penalty for keeping a data connection always on.

    the blackberry is one very good example of custom signaling done by the carrier. The device does not need to have such a high transmission rate and can save precious battery power.
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    #23  
    lol... disregard my post moon. I donít know what im talking about

    I really dont feel like i need to validate anything i posted so just disregard it if you like.

    If you want to find out more try doing some research by searching on the web or take a look at technet and such... good place to check is the Windows Mobile Team Blog... and the Exchange Server Team Blog...lots of good info at both those places.

    I'm just sharing a bit of my experience to try and help steer people in the right direction and dispel incorrect assumptions I see people making. I am not about to do all the research to gather all the links, etc and walk people through the entire process....now if you wanted to pay for consulting services that would be a different story...not that I am offering any.

    I think I have developed a good enough reputation on here for people to know I donít post incorrect information.

    Peace
    Last edited by gex; 04/22/2006 at 03:33 AM.
  4. #24  
    I think I have developed a good enough reputation on here for people to know I donít post incorrect information.
    I agree wholeheartedly. GEX is an asset to our forum.
  5. #25  
    Gex, as you pointed out in the first line of your post "In Theory".

    I agree with eki, you are an asset, don't let them get you down :-)

    I have also experienced less battery life. Its not too bad though. Since I am coming from the Samsung i730 I am used to charging the phone every night. As long as i still still make it a full day....its still good for me.
  6. #26  
    I've been getting better battery life with the update and push mail. Before I had it setup to pull my mail every 15 mins. It seems like I have about 15% more battery life at the end of the day.
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    #27  
    no battery drain here. I'm actually getting better battery life than before. I am also using push email from 4smartphone.net. This update made the phone unbelievable. Everything is operating more smoothly with the more memory.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by gex
    In theory, all things being equal, Direct Push is more efficient (lower battery usage) then AUTD (the SMS notification method).
    Being that the device initiates the https session back to Exchange, I would think that Direct Push (misnomer, but that is another discussion entirely) would be less efficient.
  9. #29  
    I'm noticing less battery life, but thats only because the connection doesn't turn off automatically anymore. It just stays on even after closing all the programs; not that I mind this, I actually prefer it in most cases.

    I'm not using direct push, it's still just checking my pop3 every 15 minutes like it used to.
  10. #30  
    Yes, each time the device polls my imap and pop accounts for email (15 minutes in my case) it stays in broadband access mode forever, causing the battery drain. Also, unchecking "Connect and check..." in Delivery Preferences for each of my accounts did not have an effect. The device still polled every 15 minutes.

    The solution was to go into each account and set the Delivery Preferences time to 0 before unchecking the box. This effectively disables all checking for email, unless I initiate it. Very aggravating, but the battery drain problem seems to be gone. When I want to check for email, I initiate it and then make sure the broadband access is disconnected. The same for web access.

    It looks like this might be regarded as a feature for some, but the diminshed battery life is truly annoying.
  11. #31  
    Has nobody figured out how to get it to disconnect AFTER it checks email. I have configured mine to not check every 15 minutes. I now check it maunally via "send/receive" however it still stays connected. I think it is a pain in the a** to keep manually disconnect. I'm starting to question this update. I liked the way the old software was configured.
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    #32  
    Hey, thanks all!

    Also coming from an i730 battery life on the 700w is incredible

    It is definitely a huge benefit from other Windows Mobile devices.

    My battery life has gone down slightly but I am guessing it is because I cant make the necessary changes on our firewall (old Netscreen 25)....gives me an excuse to play with ISA Server though so its all good...
  13. #33  
    I always take exception when people state things in theory.

    I have read both the blog site and the technet whitepapers on AUTD and Directsync. To dis someone when you admittedly haven't even read the whitepapers is bad form.

    In the future you really should cite fact and not allude to papers you have read. When you read the whitepaper you will discover that even MS admits that is some scenerios Direct sync is more costly on battery life.
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    #34  
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/tec...d/default.aspx

    "You do need to adjust the connection timeout of your firewall to ensure that Direct Push functionality works efficiently. With the goal of optimizing battery life, we recommend between 15 and 30 minutes.

    To better understand this last requirement, letís look at this technology in more detail. Direct Push requires a long-lived connection between the server and the client. No data is sent over this connection unless there is e-mail to be transmitted or the device needs to reestablish its connection with the server. This means that the maximum length of the connection is determined by the lowest network timeout in the path between the device and the server.

    With good network coverage, the maximum timeout will be determined by the connection timeout enforced by firewalls that deal with Internet traffic to your Exchange front-end servers. If you keep the timeout very low, then you will force the device to reconnect several times, quickly draining its battery. As a general guideline, a timeout between 15 and 30 minutes should suffice.
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    #35  
    Q Does Direct Push Technology reduce the battery life on devices?



    A If you are getting lots and lots of e-mail and constantly sending and receiving packets, yes. However, note that for much of the lifetime of a request for change notifications, your device is just waiting for a response. GPRS radios do not consume power unless they are actively transmitting. Further, the lifetime of a request for change notifications is chosen independently by each device and, in practice, these requests tend to live for upwards of 20 minutes if youíre not receiving any e-mail. The means by which the device chooses this lifetime is tuned to minimize bytes over the wire and to maximize battery life. Five-minute scheduled sync is more poorly behaved in this regard.
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    #36  
    http://www.networkblog.net/archives/...configuration/
    "
    Exchange Direct Push Configuration


    JeffreyCentex wrote this 8:46 pm


    This is a rare Exchange posting, but with the release of MSFP ROM updates for Windows Mobile 5 Smartphones and Pocket PC Phones, Direct Push is now a reality. However, there are some optimization tweaks that can be done that would extend the battery life of the smart phone devices, plus there are some caveats when you are using firewalls that will terminate the connection too quickly.

    See here for the blog entry.

    I can vouch that Direct Push works well. I have a Cingular 8125 as my main phone right now. I installed the Imate MSFP ROM (available at XDA-Developers) and started using Direct Push as soon as my hosting provider (LanLogic) upgraded to SP2. Others at my office have the Sprint PPC6700 that has also been updated to the MSFP ROM. In general, we noticed a huge improvement in battery life. My Cingular 8125 now has about an average of 15% battery drain per day with DirectPush enabled and with about a half hour of phone calls. The CDMA-based PPC-6700 loses about 25% a day. "
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    #37  
  18. #38  
    Wow Gex...you came out with guns a blazing tonight :-)

    Thanks for the posts. Great reading.
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    #39  
    "Mike, what are you smoking?
    The PocketPC "Sleep" model has been around since the dawn of time. Okay, well, at least since the dawn of Windows CE. So why did Smartphone change it? You're going to find this hard to believe, but in a connected world, the Always On model actually burns less power than the Sleep model. Yes, you read that correctly. Staying on all the time actually burns less power than going to sleep. Here's why.

    The issue is that it takes a "long" time to go to sleep and a similarly long time to wake back up. When a PocketPC goes to sleep, we have to notify every device driver so that they can each save any important information (their "state") and shut off the hardware they're controlling. Then, on wake up, we need to notify every driver again and have them turn all their hardware on. This process can take up to three seconds in each direction.

    Smartphone, on the other hand, can come out of his idle in a millisecond, do what he needs to do, and go back to idle a millisecond after he's done.

    Imagine that your device receives a SMS message. The sleeping PocketPC will need to run the CPU for around six seconds to handle it. The Smartphone will do the same task in a few milliseconds. Waking up is much more efficient on a device that doesn't sleep. It turns on only the devices necessary, uses them for the minimum amount of time needed, and then immediately shuts them back off.

    Now, imagine a device that gets an SMS every time it moves from one cell tower to another, and imagine being in an area where you're on the boundary between two towers. Or, consider being signed in to an Instant Messenger client and having it frequently updating your friends list. Or, imagine a process that downloads data you care about every few minutes. Etc. As these things become more pervasive, we'll see the Always On power model being much more energy efficient than the sleep model. "

    http://blogs.msdn.com/windowsmobile/...01/446240.aspx
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    #40  
    ok.. now im going to the movies with my kids so wont be back on for a while
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