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  1.    #1  
    Ok, I have a question I was hoping someone could answer (skip to the end to get right to it). I've learned a lot about Bluetooth profiles from posts here on the forum. As such, I've been looking into this new generation of multi-profile supporting stereo headsets.

    Now, I know that even with yesterday's AKU2 update, the 700w still doesn't support A2DP. That's ok. What I'm looking into are double duty headsets that can playback music from an iPod and then take calls when they come in. I've tried a wired solution like the one from Tekkeon (see here). While it allows for cleaner sound for music via a wired connection to the audio device and a convenient Bluetooth connection to the phone, it's a lot of cord. It's already Summer weather here in Atlanta so I'm in full swing with shorts and t-shirt garb. Besides that, there's no control for the iPod and while you certainly could use a wired remote, that's yet another wire. So, I'm thinking that a singular Bluetooth headset would be less cluttering even with the sound quality sacrifice.

    Ok, so there are a few companies rolling out such solutions. Most I've seen are BT 1.2 supporting simultaneous A2DP and AVRCP. It looks like even though the 700w doesn't do A2DP, these dual headsets can still establish simpler BT connections to it just for calls (hopefully we'll get A2DP one day). The designs tend to be an all-in-one headset with built-in call and playback controls along with a built-in mic (see an example here). Another common design is one where you have the BT module with all controls and mic and a jack for wired headphones (see example here). The trade-off on this second design is the ability to use any headphones you prefer while sacrificing an all-in-one design.

    I also know that unless the audio device you're using supports BT natively, you'll need a specialized adpater. Adapters that take a wired audio connection and make it wireless over BT aren't new, but ones that actually add AVRP capabilities are. An example is this one from Jabra. All these devices of course raise the charging question. As in, how the heck do you charge all these especially while on the go? Beyween the phone, BT headset device, BT adapter for the audio device and audio device itself, that's 4 items to charge. The upside is that many devices support charging over USB and wall or DC USB charging adapters are readily available and interchangeable. I wonder if one of those micro USB hubs can be used as a power splitter for multiple devices, but that's for another discussion.

    Now to my question (finally ). One of the comments I've seen made in posts here regarding A2DP headsets is that some folks would like to see models supporting BT 2.0. My primary question is, what does 2.0 get you that 1.2 with simultaneous AVRCP and A2DP doesn't? Sony has a BT 2.0 unit coming out (see here) that is one of the above mentioned headsets, but is also BT 2.0. I see the display for caller ID info, but that kind of thing has been on BT headsets in the past. Maybe 2.0 allows for song info from the audio device to be displayed as well via the AVRCP profile?

    By the way, sorry for the long windedness but I figured a little background would help put the question into better context.

    Thanks for any and all info.

    Jeff
  2.    #2  
    Hmm, maybe my question was too specific. Let me rephrase more generally:

    Is there anything in the BT 2.0 spec that should make for better real world (always an important distinction over simple marketing hype) headset use over 1.2 with AVRCP and A2DP? Thanks.

    Jeff
  3. #3  
    The only thing I see is the increased bandwidth could help with the audio quality.

    Bluetooth 2.0

    This version is backwards compatible with 1.x. The main enhancement is the introduction of Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) of 2.1 Mbit/s. This has the following effects (Bluetooth SIG, 2004):

    * 3 times faster transmission speed (up to 10 times in certain cases).
    * Lower power consumption through a reduced duty cycle.
    * Simplification of multi-link scenarios due to more available bandwidth.
    * Further improved BER (bit error rate) performance.
    The above is from Wikipedia.
  4. #4  
    Hey there, this bluetake bt phone will do it.

    Bluetake Bluetooth Headphone

    I'm using it with my IPOD and the 700W. When I'm listening to IPOD, when a call comes in, it will pause my IPOD and then take the call with the headphone (it has a microphone build it).

    This is what you need:

    The headphone: Bluetake Bluetooth Headphone BT450Rx
    The transmitter for your ipod: Bluetake Stereo Pod Trasmitter BT450Tx

    I've been using this combination for the last 2 months so far so good. The paid on the neck thing is you'll have to charge 4 devices your treo 700W, IPOD, the transmitter, & the headphone. Oh well. Check it out. It got pretty good reviews.
  5.    #5  
    Yeah, I've seen a similar combination package (over the ear headphones with controls + iPod adapter) from Logitech. What's a little nicer about the Sony unit is that, even though you can't use your own headphones, the mic and control unit's LCD provides caller ID info. I'm also curious to see if it can provide music playback info as well but I guess I'll have to wait until it's launched (or the manual is posted) for more info.

    The good news is that solutions like this are becoming more and more popular so we are getting more and more choices. I've even seen a few reviews lately. See:

    http://www.engadget.com/2006/04/18/g...nds-on-review/


    http://www.pocketnow.com/index.php?a...reviews&id=801

    http://www.bluetomorrow.com/content/section/237/349

    http://www.i4u.com/section-viewarticle-116.html

    http://www.atruereview.com/bluetooth...mini/index.php

    http://www.devhardware.com/c/a/Mobil...450RxC-Review/


    Thanks also to Alex for the info on BT 2.0. In doing more research, I think I've also seen mention made of lower power consumption as well as more robust wireless transmission that may help in busy RF environments.

    Jeff
  6. #6  
    Could someone please tell me what is wrong with 700w's bluetooth. I tried several bluetooth headsets, and all of them work excellently with other phones. When I try to use the same headsets with the 700w, I hardly get any range, and the quality is really average compared with other phones? Is it the software or hardware?
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete411
    Could someone please tell me what is wrong with 700w's bluetooth. I tried several bluetooth headsets, and all of them work excellently with other phones. When I try to use the same headsets with the 700w, I hardly get any range, and the quality is really average compared with other phones? Is it the software or hardware?
    I have found that if i pair mine from the other side of the room it gets better range and cleaner connection. I think the 700w's module is power tweaked for battery life so if you pair them right next to each other the power never increases for range.

    See if this gives you any additional range.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by VZWuser
    I have found that if i pair mine from the other side of the room it gets better range and cleaner connection. I think the 700w's module is power tweaked for battery life so if you pair them right next to each other the power never increases for range.

    See if this gives you any additional range.
    I tried to do this, it might have improved a little bit, but still not as good as it works with other phones. Maybe a future update from Palm will improve this. Thanks!
  9.    #9  
    I'll have to try pairing from further away just to see the results. It's an interesting idea. As a side note, I tested somthing this morning that worked better than expected. I mentioned the problem with charging so many devices and the idea about using a small USB hub as a power splitter for USB charge capable products. Well, I had one lying around (IOGEAR 4-Port MicroHub) and tried it. I connected it directly to a USB wall power jack. I then connected 4 devices that charge over USB (my Treo, a PSP with specialized cable, an iPod, and a BT headset). They are all charging just fine. WhatI find interesting is that the hub came with a power supply, but I guess that is only in cases when you're connecting it to a USB port that doesn't supply power (like on some laptops). This is a pretty cool way to have a power splitter on the go especially since the size of the hub is really tiny. I might be a little cautious about doing this in the car though given the more limited power available from a 12V outlet.

    Jeff

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