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  1.    #1  
    From the folks at PDA Live:

    "The Mobile Malware Researchers Association (MARA) has characterized the first malware to cross-infect a smartphone or PDA from a binary on the desktop PC.

    The malware, a Trojan dubbed “crossover”, is able to spread from a Win32 desktop machine to a Windows Mobile handheld to infect both devices. With the growing use of handheld devices this proof of concept virus may become very prevalent in the future.

    When executed the virus checks what the current OS is, if it is not Windows CE or Windows Mobile it makes a copy of itself and puts a startup command to the copy in the registry local-machine-current-version-run. The virus then quietly waits for an ActiveSync connection to be detected; it can wait infinitely and every time the desktop is rebooted the virus recreates itself and again adds new copies to the registry, so that theoretically you can have so many copies running on startup it could degrade or halt the PC's performance. When an ActiveSync connection is detected the virus copies itself to the handheld device.

    If the current OS is Windows CE or Windows Mobile the virus erases all files in the \\My Documents directory. Then it copies itself to the \\Windows directory and creates a shortcut to the copy in \\Windows\\startup. When the device is reset the shortcuts execute their target files. One can theoretically have multiple copies of the virus running on startup here as well.

    The crossover virus was written in C# (C Sharp) using Visual Studio .NET 2003, the Communications Library of openNETCF.org was used and a great help. It should run on any handheld device running Windows CE or Windows Mobile and .NET CF 1.1

    The virus was sent to MARA anonymously. Detailed analysis and the binary are available to antivirus companies and security experts who qualify for MARA membership.""
  2. #2  
    Why do businesses want to adopt Windows Mobile? <SIGH> (And they *ARE* adopting it.)

    The usual argument is that one can leverage the same development tools ... but then again, the virus writers can also leverage the same development tools. You want pre-emptive multi-taskiing and background services? Great ... excellent ways to hide a virus.


    This one's out of the gate: (At least in concept mode). It infects a Win32 PC, then uses Activesync to replicate to a Windows Mobile device.

    http://news.com.com/2100-1029_3-6044...4457&subj=news
    ---
    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
    Also: Treo 750 (Test phone) / Sony Ericcson w900 (unlocked for international travel)
  3. #3  
    Lovely Reminds me of when they found the first Palm OS virus.
  4. #4  
    They found a PalmOS virus?

    Riddle me ignorant. (Sorry) Was it destructive?
    ---
    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
    Also: Treo 750 (Test phone) / Sony Ericcson w900 (unlocked for international travel)
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by driven01
    They found a PalmOS virus?

    Riddle me ignorant. (Sorry) Was it destructive?
    No, just a little bit of sarcasm, sorry.
    Last edited by hoovs; 03/01/2006 at 01:10 AM.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by driven01
    They found a PalmOS virus?

    Riddle me ignorant. (Sorry) Was it destructive?


    Actually, there were 3 listed in the virus definitions back 6 years ago when I was stupid enough to buy Norton AntiVirus for Palm. It remained that way for two years until Norton shut down the automatic virus update conduit on the product and stopped selling it. (A sucker born every minute.)

    Cheers, Perry.
  7. #7  
    Doesn't anti virus companies write the viruses..............
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by vikingjunior
    Doesn't anti virus companies write the viruses..............
    Pure thoughts only, Vike!
  9. #9  
    I always thought any derivitive of Windows was a virus in itself.
  10. #11  
    <merged>

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