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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    Because all that we do is charted, it serves to confirm receipt of information delivered electronically. Primarily, I'm responding to the immediate receipt of email on my end, not necessarily sending emails out as you mentioned.
    I'm still tryng to figure out how sending an e-mail provides any additional protection than a documented phone call. Since receipt by a machine doesnt confirm receipt by an individual, what legal value does this have ?

    I am also in NY BTW. Our insurance issues are different as MD's can usually only kill people one at a time.....our (PE's) mistakes kill people by the 100's or 1,000's
  2. #42  
    If you had included the previous 2 sentences in your quote of my prior post, your confusion could've been avoided. A voice-call leaves no evidence, simple as that, unless you enjoy heresay he said/she said litigation. But, this is not exactly the point of this thread. Point being, the immediacy of the delivery of information can make the difference between an active lifestyle and debilitation or much worse.

    I was referring to your state, NY, btw. Mine still allows surgeons to make clinical judgments and take appropriate action. If I were any of those NY patients who are clearly joint replacement/reconstruction candidates, and being denied adequate care by my surgeon (regardless of what insurance pressures are behind his/her refusal), I'd have their *** served up on a silver platter.
  3. #43  
    The title of this thread should be: "Is technology running you or are you running your technology?" Individuals should retain their right to control their own time/actions. The Pro-Push argument seems to be: Instant receipt of email is critical. My counter to that is two-fold:

    1. You clearly can't read email instantly, everywhere. If you work in restricted areas, remote areas, engage in business practices where access to your phone is somehow limited (like, for example, a doctor getting ready to use the scalpel in his hand ) attend meetings, drive cars, converse with someone respectfully, or a host of other non-reading activities, instant email just isn't a factor.

    2. You already control when you read your email. The only way instant email can matter is when you are staring at the screen waiting for the next email to tell you to do something. If you're only doing that, you are unproductive. Every time you find yourself doing that, you are wasting time. Everytime you are distracted from doing something productive by random (or signaled) checks of a just-arrived email you are not the hyper-connected magician mentioned in the "fantasy paradigm" of other posts here. Productive, successful folks know how to get the job done - they also control their technology, not vice-versa.

    Like I said, full time access to email wirelessly is important, but the claiming a critical difference of a minute or two on email transmission is silly.
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    #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe
    The title of this thread should be: "Is technology running you or are you running your technology?" Individuals should retain their right to control their own time/actions. The Pro-Push argument seems to be: Instant receipt of email is critical. My counter to that is two-fold:

    1. You clearly can't read email instantly, everywhere. If you work in restricted areas, remote areas, engage in business practices where access to your phone is somehow limited (like, for example, a doctor getting ready to use the scalpel in his hand ) attend meetings, drive cars, converse with someone respectfully, or a host of other non-reading activities, instant email just isn't a factor.

    2. You already control when you read your email. The only way instant email can matter is when you are staring at the screen waiting for the next email to tell you to do something. If you're only doing that, you are unproductive. Every time you find yourself doing that, you are wasting time. Everytime you are distracted from doing something productive by random (or signaled) checks of a just-arrived email you are not the hyper-connected magician mentioned in the "fantasy paradigm" of other posts here. Productive, successful folks know how to get the job done - they also control their technology, not vice-versa.

    Like I said, full time access to email wirelessly is important, but the claiming a critical difference of a minute or two on email transmission is silly.

    Very valid points, however for me the attraction of push email is not the fact that it arrives faster - it's the eleagance of it. I love not having to do anything to get my email. I love knowing that my device isn't blindly conecting/synchronizing every x minutes when it doesn't need to. Maybe it's just the geek in me, but there is something very appealing about this - and once you've had push email - be it a Blackberry or Chatter - it's difficult to go back.
  5. #45  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe
    The title of this thread should be: "Is technology running you or are you running your technology?" Individuals should retain their right to control their own time/actions. The Pro-Push argument seems to be: Instant receipt of email is critical. My counter to that is two-fold:

    1. You clearly can't read email instantly, everywhere. If you work in restricted areas, remote areas, engage in business practices where access to your phone is somehow limited (like, for example, a doctor getting ready to use the scalpel in his hand ) attend meetings, drive cars, converse with someone respectfully, or a host of other non-reading activities, instant email just isn't a factor.

    2. You already control when you read your email. The only way instant email can matter is when you are staring at the screen waiting for the next email to tell you to do something. If you're only doing that, you are unproductive. Every time you find yourself doing that, you are wasting time. Everytime you are distracted from doing something productive by random (or signaled) checks of a just-arrived email you are not the hyper-connected magician mentioned in the "fantasy paradigm" of other posts here. Productive, successful folks know how to get the job done - they also control their technology, not vice-versa.

    Like I said, full time access to email wirelessly is important, but the claiming a critical difference of a minute or two on email transmission is silly.
    The needs we have are no one's fantasy. Your rebuke of an arena you clearly have no intimate experience in is unwarranted. Medical care is mobile today and not an area which can be easily scripted and, therefore, when we require updates on a patient's status in order to order intervention, we certainly have no need for interference. Your cavalier and condescending tone are uncalled for.
  6. #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    A voice-call leaves no evidence, simple as that, unless you enjoy heresay he said/she said litigation.
    I have used them in court many times.

    1. Phone company has record of call. A record of a 10 minute call is clear evidence that a person at location "A" talked to a person at location "B". If it's a cell phone, than where's the excuse ?

    2. I keep writen "Telephone conversation records" which are aslo admissible in court. Once had a contractor say he never spoke to me but my conversation record included where he was when I talked to him on his cell phone. Judge asked How I would know where he was at that point in time if I hadn't spoken to him.

    3. The follow up e-mail that states "As per our telephone conversation of a few minutes ago ....." confirms that the telephone conversation took place.

    4. The follow up letter (certified mail) confirms 1-3 again starting "As per our ...."

    I recently had a government contract terminated, well threatened to, because I had not responded to two e-mails. I never received them. First thing gov't attorney asked sender was "Did you call and speak to him personally ?".....after dude said no, I was asked to leave room and contract was reinstated.
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by Minsc
    Very valid points, however for me the attraction of push email is not the fact that it arrives faster - it's the eleagance of it. I love not having to do anything to get my email. I love knowing that my device isn't blindly conecting/synchronizing every x minutes when it doesn't need to. Maybe it's just the geek in me, but there is something very appealing about this - and once you've had push email - be it a Blackberry or Chatter - it's difficult to go back.
    In short "It's Kew-el" . The important thing is that the e-mail is there when you are ready to sit down and read it. Now if you can resist, ignore or turn off the notifications, you can be productive. To do otherwise, you are distracted and less productive. Is it fun ? ....yes....is it cool technology.... yes ?.... does it make you more productive ?.....it can if used judiciously but in most cases the opposite will be true. Just look at the time stamps on all these messages during time where all of us peeps are supossed to be working !!!!!

    I can imagine sitting in a dentist chair, chiropractic table or doctor's examining room and having the dude / dudette stop whatever he she is doing to look at their Treo's....I'm taking money off the bill dude !

    As a guy who throws his Treo in the cradle every Friday night tho, I have to wonder what the impact is on battery life and memory.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    Medical care is mobile today and not an area which can be easily scripted and, therefore, when we require updates on a patient's status in order to order intervention, we certainly have no need for interference. Your cavalier and condescending tone are uncalled for.
    Interestingly enough, there was just a study published in our major paper over the weekend talking about permitting cell phone use in hospitals. Study done showed, liek with the plane thing, it really didn't have an effect on equipment except for one devcie and ONLY if you were standing within 3 feet of it.

    Article went on to say that they thought of allowing cell phone use in hospitals for doctors only but survey showed that like 80% of doctors rely on pagers for notification.
  9. #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by JackNaylorPE
    I have used them in court many times.

    1. Phone company has record of call. A record of a 10 minute call is clear evidence that a person at location "A" talked to a person at location "B". If it's a cell phone, than where's the excuse ?

    2. I keep writen "Telephone conversation records" which are aslo admissible in court. Once had a contractor say he never spoke to me but my conversation record included where he was when I talked to him on his cell phone. Judge asked How I would know where he was at that point in time if I hadn't spoken to him.

    3. The follow up e-mail that states "As per our telephone conversation of a few minutes ago ....." confirms that the telephone conversation took place.

    4. The follow up letter (certified mail) confirms 1-3 again starting "As per our ...."

    I recently had a government contract terminated, well threatened to, because I had not responded to two e-mails. I never received them. First thing gov't attorney asked sender was "Did you call and speak to him personally ?".....after dude said no, I was asked to leave room and contract was reinstated.
    What you state is factual within the course of otherwise normal business dealings. However, HIPAA regs (and our general credo prior to HIPAA) for the medical/surgical community dictate a differing set of rules we must abide by in order to 1) protect patient confidentiality via documentation vs verbal orders and commentary, and 2) protect ourselves from exposure. When a physician ends up in court it is because a patient was harmed. Harm, in this sense, has more gravity than the 'harm' that a business experiences because a debt goes unpaid, etc. I have no intention of over-dramatizing this significance, but it must be stated that the responsibility for the life of a person means more, both in legal terms and in humanity's terms, than most any other measure.

    Many times I've had nurses or reps to have to go up under my gown to take my blackberry off my hip and read to me the incoming email. Either that, or keep it with them during the case in order to read the email to me as it came in.

    Cell phones are regularly used, or at least available, in the OR. Trouble is that we know what we're doing while those outside this arena think they do. That may apply in more ways than one.

    Maybe we shouldn't take the clinical data we get so seriously and just let everyone just hangout and chill. Not like the surgical patient's going anywhere, ya know. We should just take it easy and let the answers come to us. And I'm not ultimately paying the $300-$600/minute to use the OR suite anyway. And it's not like anesthesia time has any negative side effects or risks pulmonary emboli or anything. Especially in open joint patients. How reckless of me. What was I thinking?
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    What you state is factual within the course of otherwise normal business dealings......When a physician ends up in court it is because a patient was harmed. Harm, in this sense, has more gravity than the 'harm' that a business experiences because a debt goes unpaid, etc. I have no intention of over-dramatizing this significance, but it must be stated that the responsibility for the life of a person means more, both in legal terms and in humanity's terms, than most any other measure.
    I am talking about communication involving the constructionn of high rise buildings, closure of bridges ....I think killing 100's of people at once is at least as serious as one life on a table. Engineers have to make calls that can affect 100's perhaps 1,000's of lives in an instant....."gee do I close this bridge after the barge hit the piling or not". I damn sure am not gonna trust that call to the state police and other emergency reponse organizations on an e-mail. Look at the FEMA mess w/ e-mails during Katrina and the response of the panel members to the lame statements that "I sent an e-mail but no one ever responded". I recll one questioner saying "Damn it you get on the phone and stay on the phone until you get a satisfactory repsonse".

    Many times I've had nurses or reps to have to go up under my gown to take my blackberry off my hip and read to me the incoming email. Either that, or keep it with them during the case in order to read the email to me as it came in.
    So you are syang this person's life actually depended on whether or not you remembered to charge your BB last nite ? That's scary.

    You just made me more aware of my medical choices. I will certainly observe more closely the habit of who I deal with....and they won't include anyone with a BB holster in an examining room.

    And I'm not ultimately paying the $300-$600/minute to use the OR suite anyway.
    No my insurance company and I am.....and I am not paying that fee so your nurse can read to you that your wife wants you to bring home chinese for dinner or that there's another post for you to respond to on TreoCentral.
  11. #51  
    It's been a longstanding practice that when a culture is taken down to the lab during surgery, the pathologist calls back to the OR room on the phone with the results. Technology has arrived at a point where we do not have to remember every single detail of 100% of our case load at all times. When I do 7-10 total knee replacements per week, it's unrealistic to expect me or any surgeon to remember the labs from last Thursday's 3rd total knee case. My standing orders are for the labs to be emailed to me, the circulating nurse charts the results based upon the email, which means that when the one and only phone in the room is tied up due to other obligations (which is exactly how every surgical room in most every hospital is set up), I still have the data I need in order to not stand around staring at a newly found puss pocket. Just what I need to be doing while the surgery is being beamed to Belgium and I've got 30+ patients to see in the afternoon!

    I've not shown a shread of disrespect for anyone's need (or lack thereof) for immediate email delivery nor anyone's chosen profession. Each of us uses the tools available to us as best we possibly can and I respect those who do not perceive a need for push email. Whether you like me or not, and whether you like the way medicine is practiced today doesn't really matter. The doc you see will, no doubt, have some form of communications either on his/her belt or in his/her labcoat pocket. As a patient, you should hope they use it as well as possible as a tool toward better healthcare. I'll bet you a really, really bad cup of coffee on that!
  12. #52  
    I am all for using technology to make us do our jobs better. What I find frustarting is the loss of productivity associated with those changes. I have that article downstairs somewhere that describes why, in the survey I referenced,:

    1. the majority of hospitals have cell bans for doctors, patients and visitors
    2. the majority of doctors rely on pagers.

    I think the first is a bit archaic in what we know today and shoyuld certainly be modified.
    I think the second is that a pager provides a means of communication that no one bothers with for frivolous communication.....if a pager goes off it's important stuff !

    Again, if peeps set use the technology intelligently, it can be useful. Most do not tho and simply can not resist looking at their gadget every single time it beeps. If you set up your offcie like this:

    DrMichaels@AAAkneereplacemnt.com ------ emergency stuff, limited distribution
    MikeMichaelsMD@AAkneereplacemnt.com ------ for professsional discourse, AMA e-mails etc
    MikeMichaelsMDPC@AAkneereplacemnt.com ------ for business related matters
    DRMike@AAAkneereplacemnt.com ------ for "friends and family"

    and then you PUSH the 1st one only, I think then you are making productive and efficient use of the technology. A medical report which you need for what you are doing should be at your attention right away. Personally, if I am he tech down in the lab, after e-mailing you I am still gonna call the OR or nursing station and make sure you have it to protect my hiney. But if all those e-mails are coming in whether from kids, wife, kid's school, TreoCentral, AMA dues notice, etc do you think your patients wouldn't mind the continual distractions ?

    I ask because I rarely use vibrate mode on my phone. To my mind if it's inappropriate for a phone to ring, It's just as inappropriate for me to answer it, so I use the off button. But once the phone was on vibrate accidentally on my belt and I was soldering a very expensive equipment. I was in an awkward position and one slip woulda cost me big time...darn thing scared the crap outta me when it vibrated. I dropped the soldering iron, spilt soder on the circuit board covering multiple contacts and burned a hole in the crotch of my pants....that was the scariest part .

    I get over 300 e-mails a day on three different accounts. Maybe 2 of them requires immediate action or has an impact on life, safety , health and welfare. If I checked my screen as each oen arrived, I wouldn't get any work done.

    I did not intend to show any lack of respect for your profession. I just can't understand how you could "operate" (pun intended ) on a day to day basis with so many distractions. So the question I have to ask is this. Assuming you are not using multiple accounts, as I would have expected that you would have mentioned it, how do you filter the 95 outta 100 nuisance / fluff / non life threatening e-mails out from distracting you and your nurse in the OR, examining room or wherever you are "actively" practicing your profession with a need to have full focus on matters at hand. ?
  13. #53  
    I think a surgeon can figure out the difference between email from the lab and email from Johnny. bb email works consistently, shields users from terms like pop3 and smtp and ensures delivery. When I used to have pull, can't tell you how much time or frustration was spent on pushing retrieve email when waiting for a critical email. Anyone out there who has experienced push and pull still want to wave the flag for pull?
  14. #54  
    Quote Originally Posted by camartin
    I think a surgeon can figure out the difference between email from the lab and email from Johnny.
    Without Looking ? The example given was standing at operating table, scalpel in hand and having the nurse reach under your gown to pull out the BB an chek the mail. My question refers to what I understand is the situation in that you have no way of knowing whether a e-mail is the urgent life and death lab report or the note from da wife saying "bring home milk and bread" or there's a response in the "Why push e-mail" thread on TC .

    Sure one can tell the difference, after looking, but how do you concentrate on what you are doing if the BB is buzzing you wevery 40 seconds ? Maybe there's a feature I am not aware of but it reminds me of the Geico commercial where the person is sitting in the doctors office waiting for his prognosis and the doc says "I have great news .... I just saved 15% on my car insurance". Of course what is funny about the commercial is the doc's total disregard for the anxiety of the patient and his focus on what is, by comparison, a trivial matter affecting the doc himself. If I am in a doc's office and he keeps looking at his BB every couple of minutes, I can't help but feel his attention is not where it should be. Now of course if on my 6th visit he yanks out a handheld and says "I have got a bleeder in the waiting room", I understand priorities, but if it's Geico on the line, I'm pissed.

    Another concern, I took my phone into the dentist's just last week and explained that my son may need a ride from school and he is suppossed to call me as school offcials won't let kids not take bus unless they speak to a parent at that "minute". I had it on vibrate in the waiting room before coming in and layed it on the countertop next to the chair. While he had that laser thing in my mouth, the darm thing went off and we both jumped exclaiming at he same time that that thing "scared the ____ outta me" . I couldn't help imagining the old Val Kilmer movie (Real Genius) where he develops a weapons grade laser as a graduate project and it makes a hole in the shield , the lab wall, a tree and then thru the head of the bronze statue of the college's founder. That image of that statue is what popped into my head even though the "logical" side of my brain was saying I wa being silly.

    Even just sitting a my desk, if I answered every call, e-mail, etc that came in, when it came in, even jsut to see who is calling, I'd never et any work done. Many offcies have "no call periods" now where they won't put any calls thru during certain hours unless it is an emergency. The local health department for example sends calls to voice mail on M-W-F afternoons and T-T mornings just so the people can work undisturbed.

    Getting your urgent messages quickly and efficiently is a great thing. What kills it tho, to my mind, is that the notification system makes no differentiation between urgent, routine, nuisance and spam. If you could somehow add an "urgent" code to your e-mails, such that a checkbox was provided requiring say a 5 digit code, and only authorized persons would have that code, then I think the nuisance factor would be removed. The BB could have an audible for the urgent ones and just shut up on the other 95%.

    Then again.....

    ....to my wife, the dogs knocking over the garbage would be an emergency
    ....to my kids, his brother taking his game boy would be an emergency
    ....to my brother, the Yankees winning a game is an emergency
    ....to Perry, a 700p rumor is an emergency .... which of course it is
    ....to cients, anything they want is an emergency.

    Somebody figures this out, I'd have Push on my Treo tomorrow.
  15. #55  
    This is not rocket science. The email address used, or the way it's directed, for urgent email is only used during surgical hours, while otherwise normal email is collected only in my office. I described what I needed to our IS guys and let them do their jobs. I don't know or care how they set it up. The result is what is important to me and my patients. If anyone has had to go up under my gown during surgery to pull the damn thing off my hip it's only because I forgot to set it in the OR room on a shelf. Someone only has to get my Blackberry once. Explaining to you that I don't get emails to 'bring home milk' while I'm splattered with blood and saline in genuinely unnecessary.

    Your continued reference to a 'doc in an office visit continually looking at his BB' is completely out of line. I've never suggested any such scenario. It doesn't happen, unless that doc has been forwarned of a need to leave the office quickly, which happens if that doc is on trauma call. In those cases, another doc would take on my case load until I was able to return. As to your doc telling you "excuse me but I have a bleeder in the waiting room", your doc obviously has no regard for patient confidentiality and you should be more concerned for that than the damn phone on his belt. Your doc, in that scenario, owes you nothing but a courteous 'excuse me' while you're allowed to sit and wait for your prioritized turn.
  16. #56  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    This is not rocket science. The email address used, or the way it's directed, for urgent email is only used during surgical hours, while otherwise normal email is collected only in my office.
    It's not rocket science to simply say so either, assuming of course that they are separate accounts. If they are not separate e-mail accounts then the BB folks are telling me it ain't possible. I outlined such a scenario a few posts back with an example of multiple e-mail accounts. A simple "that's what I do" would have sufficed.

    An alternate would be to have all of your mail screened and then have this person forward the urgent mail to your separate emergency account. You had however said nothing about using multiple accounts nor about a personal mail screener .... you have now indicated that the IT guys did some techno-magic to make what you want happen.

    It doesn't seem plausible however, to me anyway, that an individual capable of using a Treo or a BB would not know that they are using multiple accounts as one would have had to create and use a separate password and name for each one of them. After using account 1 on my Treo, I have to navigate menus to receive or send mail from any of the other accounts.

    If you are now saying "I have a separate emergency e-mail account for this purpose and all other types of e-mail is handled by other accounts", as the saying goes "case closed", I have no more questions. If you don't have separate accounts, then I gotta ask for enlightenment cause nobody else I have talked to knows how to do this. If it is possible, I might use it myself, but everyone I have asked, says can't be done without multiple accounts. So Please point me in the right direction so I can figure out how to do what your IT guys have done.

    Your continued reference to a 'doc in an office visit continually looking at his BB' is completely out of line. I've never suggested any such scenario.
    Again, in the scenario described, a single account, how would he know that the buzz he just got wasn't urgent ? With a single account, there's still no way that I have been told of to distinguish routine from emergency mail. With the single account, the server can't distinguish whether it's urgent or not, so it sends it....when you hear / feel the buzz at ya hip then, what I am trying to find out is how does the recipient know whether it's urgent or not ? With multiple accounts - one used for urgent and forwarded, again, "case closed".

    As to your doc telling you "excuse me but I have a bleeder in the waiting room", your doc obviously has no regard for patient confidentiality....
    Perhaps you didn't notice but I was trying to keep the discussion as light as possible and speaking "tongue in cheek". I thot the reference to the Geico commercial made that clear. In an efficiently operating office, the doc wouldn't have to say anything other than "excuse me" as I would hear the receptionist or nurse telling him there was an "emergency" when she came in over the intercom or popped her head in the door. I gotta belive she would not waste the time typing up an e-mail and sending it to a BB.

    ...while you're allowed to sit and wait for your prioritized turn.
    Not likely. The other answer I'd ask for is to the question "when should I come back ?" as I may not want to sit around and wait indefinitely. If it was believed to be short, I'd pop my laptop open and get some work done. If not, I'll come back when it's more convenient for both of us.

    On another topic, I found the article I had previously referenced. Regarding the two subjects tangential subjects:

    "Hospital administrators have prohibited mobile phones because of concerns about electromagnetic interference. But [Dr.] Soto found the only genuine problem involved using a phone behind a ventilator. If answered near the breathing machine's on-off switch, the ventilator shuts off. Soto said the key is keeping phones turned off in the vicinity of ventilators. Pagers remain the communication device of choice in hospitals, Soto said, because "pagers are passive receptive devices. They don't put out any power, whereas your cell phone, when you hit the send button or answer button, emits energy, and that's electromagnetic energy."

    Keep in mind that Dr. Soto is saying there is no real concern about cell phone use and is promoting the lifting of the ban on cell phones, except of course in areas where there are ventilators.

    I imagine another reason that they still use pagers is penetration. I have designed and built several doctor's offcies, been involved in the construction of several medical parks and was the manager of development and construction for a hospital / wellness center in Wallingford Connecticut. One of my earlier offices was located in a former dentists office and the lead lined walls in the office that used to house the x-ray equipment was a complete dead zone.

    One common thing I notice about all these medical facilities (remember during construction, no land lines available) is that I was often completely "in communicado". I would do OK in the patient room areas with windows but in the OR's and other "interior spaces", I was SOL. Even at the nursing stations I had no signal.

    Getting back to Dr. Soto, in the current issue of the journal of Anesthesia and Analgesia, Soto reports that of the 4,018 physicians who responded to his survey, he found that 65 percent use pagers [for emergency communication]. Only 17 percent relied on cell phones.

    Again Soto is promoting cell phones as being the quicker, more efficient route. But with 82% using pagers or cell phones, there's only 18% left for BB's and everything else......so it's not exactly become the "defacto" choice of the medical profession. Again, I am not saying it shouldn't be, but that's where it apperas we are today and I am sure to the people who have made those choices, their reasons are as valid as anyone elses.
  17. #57  
    Based on the length of responses in this thread, it appears that, while those like me with push email leanings seem to waste time checking our BB or Chatter-driven solutions every few seconds, those with pull solutions spend all of their pull solution time savings responding to threads on this site.

    I guess we can call it a wash. (But you will have to pull my 7130e EVDO/laptop tethering push email device from my bleeding hands.)

    I hope my response doesn't push you over the edge.
  18. #58  
    To be quite frank, I'm not terribly interested in a debate over this trivial topic. Some have clearly entered this as some type of pissing contest, as in who can **** either the longest or farthest. They can have the blue ribbon.

    I've stated my requirement and its justifications. Many others in competing practices have begun to follow suit, as well, due to higher requirements for documentation and reference. Penetration depends upon location and type of signal which I've taken into account in order to rely upon my service, obviously. Your screed of varying degrees of relativity to the central topic is duly noted. I've invested more time than this is worth.
  19. #59  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    To be quite frank, I'm not terribly interested in a debate over this trivial topic. Some have clearly entered this as some type of pissing contest, as in who can **** either the longest or farthest. They can have the blue ribbon.
    I guess you're only interested enough in this thread to dedicate 100% of your TreoCentral posts to it.
    I've stated my requirement and its justifications.
    Repeatedly. We hear you. It seems that for your situation you have determined there's no other suitable replacement for push email. Noted. There are ample other viewpoints bouncing around here too, but yours is definitely perfect for you.
    Your screed of varying degrees of relativity to the central topic is duly noted. I've invested more time than this is worth.
    Back at you.

    Oops, look out! I think your push email is buzzing you!
  20. #60  
    Quote Originally Posted by bonzmccoy
    ...Some have clearly entered this as some type of pissing contest, as in who can **** either the longest or farthest. They can have the blue ribbon.

    I think this pissing contest will be won on volume and repetition.

    Of those arguing the merits of less immediate and reliable email (pull email), how many rely on or use SMS? Why not start a thread "why SMS?" Why did the telegraph serve a purpose when the Pony Express mail service might do.

    When I'm starting a call with a client and they say "I just sent you an email that is relevant to our conversation" my response since getting my BB has been "I've got it right here, let's get started."
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