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  1.    #1  
    Is anyone intimately familiar with Verizon's upgrade policy ? I have only had my i730 for 6 months, and they are telling me that my only option for a 700w is full retail of $619.99.

    Is this true ? I have upgraded phones before with only 1 year on them and gotten upgrade discounts as long as i recommited to a new 2 year contract ?
  2. #2  
    I think it is 11 months after the purchase
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    #3  
    are you serious?
  4. #4  
    VZW's policy is "new every two," which translates into a up to $100 credit towards a new phone every 2 years. I've heard that they will also do the upgrade when you get within two months or so of the end of the 2 years. My experience is that they used to be a lot more flexible if you talked nice (especially with a VZW phone rep). However, I was unable to get them to do anything when I bought the 700w (which I subsequently returned) because I had bought a new phone about 9 months before. I had to pay full price. And, if you are on the Family share plan, only the master phone gets the upgrade every two years, though you can get them to upgrade another line with a little juggling of paper work. However, if you do that, you have to wait another two years from that upgrade for another. At least that's the way it's worked for me.
  5. #5  
    In another thread I suggested to someone ( he *really* wanted to stay with Verizon) that he switch to Sprint, have his numbe rported, and then before trial period ends, switch back. He called Sprint and Buy.com (where he was buying 700w for $99) and was told he needed to wait 2 days before switching back to Verizon butwould still get "the deal".
  6. #6  
    I just went through this. You have to wait a year on an existing phone before you can take advantage of the 2 year contract pricing on a new phone.
  7.    #7  
    Hrm .. well considering the early cancelation fee is $175 i think it is cheaper to cancel and then resubscribe as a new customer, yes ?
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by RobN17
    I just went through this. You have to wait a year on an existing phone before you can take advantage of the 2 year contract pricing on a new phone.
    That's why cancelling service , going soemwhere else and then coming back with new account helps. Seems real dumb tho.....if peeps are doing this en masse, then they are sure doing a lota paperwork for nothing.

    It really helps to walk into an "all carriers" store.....in my experience, these guys have always been cheaper than any on line sources, never even bring up a 2 year contract and know the ins and outs of "working" all the discount and rebate policies.

    When I bought my Treo, I cancelled my existing "no contract" Cingular account and got a better telephone number with only a 1 year contract.....got $250 in discounts, a $50 rebate for 6 month data subscription.
  9. #9  
    The best people to talk to at any cell phone provider are in the "Customer Retention Department." They are the only ones with the power to override policies like that.

    Chris Green
  10. #10  
    Hopefully, before long, all this "contract" nonsense with cellular providers with be a thing of history. There are several lawsuits in progress aiming to do this that - get rid of the cellular industry's extortion business practices, including phone locking. That stuff may have been permissible back in the day when cell phones cost $2000 and it was a major deal to add and maintain users on their networks. Now, it takes 10 minutes to get on or off a network, complete with new phone number and ready to go. And most of that time is devoted to charging your credit card.

    Infrastructure continues to grow, justifying some costs, but not at the rates it used to. Its time the cell phone industry joins the 21st century. The way the cellular industry continues to operate in the past reminds me of that landline phone tax that phone companies had been charging until just a few years ago - for paying for the Spanish-American War in 1898
  11. #11  
    Hi,

    I had the same issue. I upgraded about 7 months ago.
    I pay about $120 permonth for my bill.
    I called a CSR and finally got them to agree to an early upgrade at $499.
    I went into the store and the store manager gave me a choice.
    Early upgrade at $499 or 25% off retail with no contract extension. Duh!!!!
    Anyway, I think he made a mistake, but I really don't care. I got the phone for $464 and
    also some additional credits because they gave the run around a few times.

    tech
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by DaleReeck
    Hopefully, before long, all this "contract" nonsense with cellular providers with be a thing of history. There are several lawsuits in progress aiming to do this that - get rid of the cellular industry's extortion business practices, including phone locking. That stuff may have been permissible back in the day when cell phones cost $2000 and it was a major deal to add and maintain users on their networks. Now, it takes 10 minutes to get on or off a network, complete with new phone number and ready to go. And most of that time is devoted to charging your credit card.

    Infrastructure continues to grow, justifying some costs, but not at the rates it used to. Its time the cell phone industry joins the 21st century. The way the cellular industry continues to operate in the past reminds me of that landline phone tax that phone companies had been charging until just a few years ago - for paying for the Spanish-American War in 1898
    Well, from my understanding the companies lock you into this "contract" because they lure you in with "cheap" prices on phones, eating ~$200 of the cost themselves (notice how you get $150-200 off of the price of a phone when you commit to the 2 year contract?). The early termination fee is just about that cost, usually being $175, and seems to really just be there to prevent people from signing up for new service, getting a $600 phone for $400, cancelling their service, selling the phone for full price to make some quick money, rinse and repeat.

    I have no problem with this "contract" if it has the potential of saving me a few hundred dollars if I happen to stay with the carrier for the full 2 years. Worst case scenario: you get out of your contract early and end up retroactively paying full price on the phone that you recieved the deal on.

    By the way, I was that poster referred to earlier as trying to stick with Verizon. Although I do prefer to stick with Verizon, since their reception is better in the areas I live, My issue was that I wanted to stick with my number, which I was having problems keeping while getting the buy.com deal. The update on that is now that I've signed up with Sprint, I tried porting my number again, to no avail. Apparently they still have it reported as a "Verizon number" and so I can't port it through them. They did however give me the procedure to manually port my number, while still getting the rebate, if anyone is interested:
    -Order new phone with new number
    -Once new account/number is activated, call up verizon porting department and tell them I want to keep my old number, making sure that they enter it in under the dealer code for Inphonic (the rebate handler for buy.com)
    -Call Inphonic back to inform them of the changed phone #
  13. #13  
    22 months on a 2 year contract 10 months on a 1 year is the upgrade policy. early upgrades require a proccessing fee. early upgrades are not done on 1 year contracts. you have to have at least 1 yr completed on a 2 year contract to qualify for an early upgrade and your price plan has to be of a certain value and above. hope that helps
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymouse
    Well, from my understanding the companies lock you into this "contract" because they lure you in with "cheap" prices on phones, eating ~$200 of the cost themselves (notice how you get $150-200 off of the price of a phone when you commit to the 2 year contract?).
    Of course, the big question then is, how much are these phones really worth? Does a 700w really cost $619.99? I mean, you can get the 650 for a much cheaper price than the 700 (using without contract for comparative price). Yet is the 650 worth $100-$200 less than a 700w? Not likely. There is way too much margin on the phones IMO.

    A better way is to make most phones free and a few of the more expensive ones like PDA phones maybe $100. The cell companies (who make rediculous profits due to their high service charges) then pay the phone manufacturers the true cost of the phone plus a satisfactory profit. Yeah, the cell companies take the hit, but, like oil companies, the cell phone companies could cut profits in half and still make a killing - especially VZW. So it won't hurt them. As it stands, the cell copanies make sick money, the cell phone makers make sick money and we get stuck with the bill. One way or another, its time for a change.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by DaleReeck
    Of course, the big question then is, how much are these phones really worth? Does a 700w really cost $619.99? I mean, you can get the 650 for a much cheaper price than the 700 (using without contract for comparative price). Yet is the 650 worth $100-$200 less than a 700w? Not likely. There is way too much margin on the phones IMO.
    The 660 is cheaper for the same reason any piece of electronics goes down in price. Sure it may not cost that much money to physically manufacture each device, but the companies need to recover their expenses that went into the development and testing, plus handling defective units via refunds, etc. Companies are never trully going to give things away for free. They always have an angle they're playing. Even when something really is "free" it is usually a way for the company to get cheaper advertising.

    A better way is to make most phones free and a few of the more expensive ones like PDA phones maybe $100. The cell companies (who make rediculous profits due to their high service charges) then pay the phone manufacturers the true cost of the phone plus a satisfactory profit. Yeah, the cell companies take the hit, but, like oil companies, the cell phone companies could cut profits in half and still make a killing - especially VZW. So it won't hurt them. As it stands, the cell copanies make sick money, the cell phone makers make sick money and we get stuck with the bill. One way or another, its time for a change.
    The companies already do this. I don't know if there's a single carrier out there that you couldn't go into and set up a 2-yr agreement and walk out with a free phone. Cancel that 2 yr agreement, though, and your phone now cost you $175. Then there are increasingly more and more expensive models, until you get to the "top of the line Treo 700w" for Verizon, which you'll see drop to $100 about when the Treo 900 comes out, and supply and demand drop the Treo down to that value.

    And why in the world would the cell companies choose to charge less money if they're making sick profit? Take a simple course in economics and you'll see why they'll keep charging what they do. You just have to realize that these companies aren't out there to serve us, they're out there to make money, and they're going to try to make as much money in whatever way possible. If they figure out that offering us good service makes them more money (such as Verizon spending more money for english speaking customer service reps, as well as having more/better towers for better service coverage) then that's how they'll do it, but all that cost gets passed right back onto the customer...at least those willing to pay for better service.
  16. #16  
    Even though they they do make "sick profits" they also need alot of that money to continue network growth. Last year cingular invested 6 billion and verizon invested 4 billion. its not like those new high speed networks are cheap to construc and maintain.
  17. #17  
    They actually do early upgrades on one year contracts.
    I never do two year contracts.
    Was able to qualify for an early upgrade.

    tech

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