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  1.    #1  
    If you are an avid one handed user of the Treo like me, I knew I wasn't going to like the 700w. Am not a alone. This is a quote from Walt Mossberg, one of the most influencial gadget reviewers.

    "inferior to the Palm software for one-handed use on the go"

    read the review here
    http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html
  2. NRG
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    #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by tj8212
    If you are an avid one handed user of the Treo like me, I knew I wasn't going to like the 700w. Am not a alone. This is a quote from Walt Mossberg, one of the most influencial gadget reviewers.

    "inferior to the Palm software for one-handed use on the go"

    read the review here
    http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html
    Same thing was said in the NY Times. I will wait for the 700P.
  3. #3  
    Same here. I'm looking forward to the 700p (assuming it's not to expensive) now that I've seen the w. I was open at one point because I wanted something diffferent but not now.
    iPhone 4S
    Former Treo & Storm Owner
    Cigar Lover
  4. #4  
    Once again, Mossberg and the NYTimes guy are very biased against Windows Mobile. Since getting my 700 yesterday, the ONLY time I have ever used the stylus was to calibrate the screen. Everything else can be done perfectly well one-handed. It's a far superior device to its Palm OS counterpart.
  5. #5  
    I have one and I can tell you it's definitely one handed. completely. you just have waay more options of how to do things than you did before. you can use the buttons or touch the screen and there's a lot of ways to do everything. also, you have a lot more options. It really is like having a mini laptop. it's a pretty complete os. what sucks is that I can't seem to do dun with it.
  6. #6  
    I played with one for about 30 minutes today in the Verizon store. I think one-handed operation is excellent on the device. The best ever on a ppc device. I also love the new design. Its more rounded and feels great in the hand.

    I did wish I could set the screen alittle brighter, but it wasnt bad.
  7.    #7  
    i don't know men... I tried this thing and the one handed navigation just does not feel as fluid as the Palm version
  8. psywzrd's Avatar
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    #8  
    How's the screen guys? Have you been able to compare it side by side with a 650?
  9. #9  
    At the store I went to, they had a 650 right next to it. The biggest thing I noticed was the 650 screen was brighter. Other than that, I didnt really see a huge difference in resolution.

    I might be wrong, but I don't think you can turn off the contact finder on the today screen. It takes up alot of space on the small screen.
  10. Stihl's Avatar
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    #10  
    HAY GUYS DID YUO KNEW PALM n WINDOZe (lol!) ARE DiffRAN!!!! I H8 **mobile os inserted here** cuz it's SUCH a **insert complaint here**.

    These threads are awsome.
  11. #11  
    Stihl,

    That was probably the post of the year. You make alot of good points.
  12. #12  
    You can hide the contact finder on the Today screen, and it pop-ups when you start typing.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcus
    You can hide the contact finder on the Today screen, and it pop-ups when you start typing.
    Okay marcus that's just awesome, I never knew about that. That's a great feature, no need to have that taking up space when typing brings it up anyway.
  14. #14  
    I looked in the today items screen and didnt see an entree for it.

    The web search plugin is very cool though
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zorn
    Once again, Mossberg and the NYTimes guy are very biased against Windows Mobile. Since getting my 700 yesterday, the ONLY time I have ever used the stylus was to calibrate the screen. Everything else can be done perfectly well one-handed. It's a far superior device to its Palm OS counterpart.
    No Dun huge drawback; lesser talk time; More expensive

    Agreed that it has a couple of cool features and EVD0

    Why do you call it a Superior device ?
  16. #16  
    I'm no stranger to Windows Mobile devices. (I see just about all of them in my job.) That said, here is my impressions of the 700w now that I've gotten to dork with it for a few hours. (in comparision with my Treo 650.)

    - Horrid screen. Not as crisp anf very much dimmer.
    - Ugly icons (all WM devices, cosmetic)
    - thicker than the T650
    - feels much slower, less intuitive and less fluid. This thing screams "I need a UI overhaul" ... not as nice to work with
    - No flash on camera (none on the 650 either, but it would be nice)
    - No DUN
    - the stupid thing wants to "dial" #777 whenever I want to do anything network related. It seems to slow down the EVDO advantage a bit. (I mostly do email on these things)
    - No threaded SMS

    On the plus side:
    - EVDO is quite a bit faster (but again, I mostly do email)
    - I like the keyboard a lot more.
    - I can use the same power adapter and car charger.

    I won't be keeping this, but it's been fun to look at.

    The worst part about the whole thing is that I don't even see what sets the 700 apart from other WM devices. HP and even AudioVox make devices at least as good as this. I don't get it.
    ---
    iPhone / Samsung Epix

    Current playtoys:
    Also: Treo 750 (Test phone) / Sony Ericcson w900 (unlocked for international travel)
  17. Cartman's Avatar
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    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by mobileman
    At the store I went to, they had a 650 right next to it. The biggest thing I noticed was the 650 screen was brighter. Other than that, I didnt really see a huge difference in resolution.
    The 700w comes with brighness set to medium... if you set it all the way up its just as bright... (at the expense of battery life of course).
  18. #18  
    Full Review below:


    PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY
    By WALTER S. MOSSBERG

    A New Palm Treo Uses
    Microsoft's Software,
    But It Doesn't Beat 650
    January 5, 2006; Page A13

    Palm's Treo smart phones have been the best high-end cellphones on the market, with the finest combination of voice, email and Web-browsing capabilities in a hand-held device.

    But many corporate information-technology departments have refused to buy the phone. Why? Because the Treo is powered by the Palm operating system and not by software from Microsoft, the only company whose software is supported by many IT departments.

    So Palm this week introduced a Treo model that uses the latest version of Microsoft's Windows Mobile software (formerly known as Pocket PC). On the outside, the new Treo 700w looks very much like the current Palm-based model, the Treo 650, which will remain on sale and will continue to be developed on a parallel track. On the inside, though, the new Treo's key software functions -- phone, email, Web, multimedia -- are all different.
    [Palm]

    I have been testing the Treo 700w, which will be sold by Verizon Wireless, to see how it stacks up against the Treo 650, the phone I carry every day.

    My verdict: Despite some nice new features, the Windows Mobile software is still inferior to the Palm software for one-handed use on the go. Its crucial email and phone functions are also weaker. And there's a serious bug in its email software that affects individuals, though not corporate users. So the Treo 700w is neither as easy to use nor as powerful as the Treo 650. In addition, the screen on the 700w offers significantly lower resolution than the screen on the 650, and the new model costs twice as much -- $400 versus $200.

    For individual users, the main advantage of the new Treo 700w is that it is the first Treo to work on Verizon's high-speed EV-DO network. That network delivers data speeds that rival those of home DSL lines. But the speed advantage will be short-lived, because I expect to see a Palm-based Treo in coming months that can also use the EV-DO network.

    At first glance, the phones look nearly identical, though the new 700w is a bit more rounded. The key dimensions are all the same, but the color scheme is a bit different and the 700w has a slightly better keyboard. The individual keys are squarer, with a bit more room between them.

    The built-in camera on the new model is much better than the primitive one on the 650. It can shoot at a resolution of 1.3 megapixels, up from just a third of a megapixel for the older camera. In my tests, the 700w's pictures were much better. But the resolution of the screen on the 700w, a vastly more important component, has changed for the worse. Although it is about the same physical size as the 650 screen, it has a resolution of only 240 by 240, 44% lower than the 320-by-320 resolution on the Treo 650 screen.

    There are some offsetting pluses. In my tests, downloading Web pages on the Treo 700w was wicked fast for a hand-held, typically hovering between 500 and 800 kilobits per second, roughly 10 times as fast as on the Treo 650. Also, the new model has more than twice as much usable memory, and slightly better claimed battery life.

    Palm has also added some nice features to the Windows Mobile software. The Today page, which summarizes information like appointments and unread email, has been vastly beefed up. It now includes a box for looking up phone numbers and one for doing a Google search.

    In addition, you can quickly initiate a phone call from the Today screen in a number of ways: You can start typing a number or a name from your contacts list, and that contact will pop up. You can use a previously assigned speed-dial letter or number. Or you can set up a scrolling bar containing photos of your frequent contacts and then tap on the relevant picture.

    Palm has added other goodies. You can choose to respond to an incoming call with a text message, which is great if you're in a meeting. And when listening to voice mail, you can use VCR-like icons to navigate among messages.

    But lots of tasks on the Treo 700w require extra steps. On the 650, one click of a button takes you to email. On the 700w, two button presses are necessary. On the 650, the leading email programs allow you to delete a message by pressing one key. On the 700w, you have to press a key, view a menu and then press a second key.

    And the email program lacks many of the advanced features of VersaMail or SnapperMail on the Palm-based Treo. For instance, there's no simple way to delete -- or to mark as read -- large groups of messages.

    When you're on a phone call on a Palm-based Treo, you can turn on the speaker phone or mute the microphone by tapping large icons with your thumb. On the Windows-based Treo, you have to open a menu and then select these functions.

    And then there's that email bug. If you're using a so-called POP email account, like the ones offered to consumers by EarthLink and many others, the Treo 700w will disconnect from the network after it checks for new email. This means that when the 700w next checks for email -- or when you next try to get on the Net -- you'll have to wait for it to dial into the network again, which is annoying. Microsoft is working on a fix, but it will take months to deploy the patch to users.

    The Treo 700w will appeal to some Windows Mobile fans, and to some corporate IT staffs. But for everyone else, I advise sticking with the Palm-based Treos.

    Email me at mossberg@wsj.com.
    Off to iPhone land...
  19. #19  
    The one I played with had brightness set to max.
  20. #20  
    I just read this on Wall Street Journal and I was really surprised how negative Mossberg is towards the Treo 700w and its inferiority to the Treo 650.

    The article sounds like he is looking forward to the next Treo for Palm (probably named Treo 680 or 700).

    I am looking forward to the next Treo for Palm on Sprint and plan to get one for me and my fiancÚ as soon as they are released.

    Up until reading this article, I would have considered a Mobile Windows Treo on Sprint (if one every came out). I hope Palm can help Microsoft help get the Windows Mobile OS working better on the Treo.

    Russell
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