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  1.    #1  
    Hello,

    I recently did not use my Palm Pre for a about a week nor did I charge it. When I charged it and turned it back on all of my text messages were gone. My contacts are in all still there - my email account required me to reenter the password.

    I need a couple of those text messages for a court battle. I've downloaded the DB3 file on my computer and checked via that way and the only text message is the one i sent when turning the phone back on.

    I tried the "Notepad" solution and I can't find what I am looking for.

    What happened and is there anything that can be down now?
  2.    #2  
    I forgot to mention that my phone was off because I switched to a Droid phone. I had the Pre reactivated to just forward the text messages to myself. The text messages were there when I did the switch to the Droid. I don't know if re-activating the phone caused the text messages to be deleted.
  3. #3  
    me thinks you should have backed up the texts and they are probably lost forever now. I've heard that neither Verizon nor Sprint can get copies of the actual texts only the dates and times (not sure if that is totally true or only because it requires a court warrant --- call and ask your carrier).

    I would think that the texts deleted because the phone got reset when it was deactivated when you jumpped over to the Droid....
  4. #4  
    You can try the below, they may or may not be there.

    Using WebOS Quick Install, go to Tools, then Receive File (you'll need to be in Developer mode to do this).
    enter: /var/luna/data/dbdata/PalmDatabase.db3 and select your save location.

    View the db3 file with: SQLite Database Browser

    In SQLite Database Browser, select the "Browse Data" tab and look for com_palm_pim_FolderEntry in the drop down menu.

    This will be pretty messy because Email and SMS's are stored in the same table within the database.

    The best way to view the data, in my opinion, would be to do an export in SQLite, export com_palm_pim_FolderEntry in csv format (be sure to include .csv at the end of the filename, SQLite doesn't include this for some reason), then open it up with Excel or similar app. I deleted all columns except for deviceTimeStamp, fromAddress, timeStamp, summary, and messageText. I then sorted the data by the timeStamp column which allowed me to view my messages (received and sent) in the order they occurred. Sent messages have no fromAddress so if you attempt to sort by both timeStamp and fromAddress your messages won't appear in order with received messages.

    Hope all that makes sense.

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    Last edited by NachoB; 11/29/2010 at 07:53 AM. Reason: Update table location / procedure.
    If you found my post useful then please sign up for a Dropbox Account, I could use the extra 250mb of storage.

    HOW TO: Zip/Unzip via Pre/Pixi using Terminal
    HOW TO: Modify DTMF audio (webOS 1.4.5 or earlier)
    Palm Pre wallpapers
  5. #5  
    Just re read ur post, you can omit the part about retrieving the db3 since you already have it.
    Last edited by NachoB; 11/22/2010 at 01:48 PM.
    If you found my post useful then please sign up for a Dropbox Account, I could use the extra 250mb of storage.

    HOW TO: Zip/Unzip via Pre/Pixi using Terminal
    HOW TO: Modify DTMF audio (webOS 1.4.5 or earlier)
    Palm Pre wallpapers
  6. #6  
    If you ever used save/restore when the text messages were there and backed them up, you can find an html table in the zip for the messging backup that will have your texts with to and from numbers, message body and dates. They will be in the USB portion of your drive which should have survived a profile load or even a dr, but not a secure erase. If you copied the save/restore folder to a computer you can find it there as well.
    Clicking the Thanks button is a great way to say... well THANKS
    Phone Apps: Church Search, Tap for HELP
    TouchPad Apps: Tap for HELP! HD, webOS Meetups
  7. #7  
    I have to wonder why, if you have texts or something that are of such vital importance, you wouldn't have backed them up immediately? Either when they were received, or at the moment you realized their importance to whatever issue has arisen? You never know what might happen, you could lose your phone, it could be stolen, it could end up borked, just take your pick. It shouldn't be relied on as the only source for anything that is that extremely important!
    Sent from my favorite gadget!
  8. #8  
    Once again, like the last time a question like this was asked, I am sure that text messages from a device like the Pre would not be admissable in court. It would be relatively easy to spoof them. You can simply use the SQLite tool mentioned above to insert data into the DB3 file. Any lawyer worth his salt would get those text messages thrown out as "evidence".

    But I wish you luck!
  9. #9  
    I plead the Fifth and declare myself incompetent to stand trial.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    Once again, like the last time a question like this was asked, I am sure that text messages from a device like the Pre would not be admissable in court. It would be relatively easy to spoof them. You can simply use the SQLite tool mentioned above to insert data into the DB3 file. Any lawyer worth his salt would get those text messages thrown out as "evidence".

    But I wish you luck!
    I was able to use them to get a restraing order. We just had to get copies of the dates/times the person sent messages to me and correspond them to mine.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlupkelly View Post
    I was able to use them to get a restraing order. We just had to get copies of the dates/times the person sent messages to me and correspond them to mine.
    That's great, glad they could help you out of a tough situation. In your case I assume there is just a "probable cause" standard which I assume those messages would meet.

    However, I still stand by the claim that it would not hold up as evidence of criminal activity. Like "I will pay you $50,000 to kill my boss." being evidence of solicitation of a hired killer. At least I hope to God that no one ever has to rely on txt messages for something like that.
  12. #12  
    Mikey, I'm gonna say that since a verbal thread can be used the text could be used as evidence however you theory could stand that there would possibly be suspicision or doubt placed on them by the defense or prosecution. I'm thinking if the service provider could provide the texts too it would lay more credibility on them (I think I recall Sprint and Verizon saying they couldn't give copies of what was actually text but I could be wrong).
  13. #13  
    Mikey, I just checked with my attorney in Arizona and a friend who is an attorney in New York..Both say text messages are allowed and used as evidence in court proceedings both civil and criminal.
  14. #14  
    Service providers will tell you they cannot provide the content for text messages and other electronic content that have been sent over their networks. However that is in response to consumer requests, not in response to a subpoena in a civil or criminal suit. Electronic transmission and media records are kept and archived in any number of locations and are frequently retrieved for these types of situations.

    However even if they could not corroborate the content of the txt messages, each carrier could independantly corroborate the dates, times and size of the messages in order to establish a measure of veracity to the database in question.
    Clicking the Thanks button is a great way to say... well THANKS
    Phone Apps: Church Search, Tap for HELP
    TouchPad Apps: Tap for HELP! HD, webOS Meetups
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlupkelly View Post
    Mikey, I just checked with my attorney in Arizona and a friend who is an attorney in New York..Both say text messages are allowed and used as evidence in court proceedings both civil and criminal.
    Wow that is quite scary given the relative ease to spoof these messages. Again, my theory only holds water if it is true that carriers can not, whether under subpoena or not, provide the contents of the messages. I find it hard to believe that they could not, but just think of the masses of data that this would a carrier would have to maintain.

    Of course, my argument only holds water in the situation where the person with a Pre were trying to use it against someone else. If the device that sent the message still had the actual message (not the spoofed one) it would then become a "he said, she said" situation.

    At this point in time, interesting conversation is all this is.
  16. #16  
    I might have asked (and or read before) but how can you spoof a text?
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlupkelly View Post
    I might have asked (and or read before) but how can you spoof a text?
    Edit the sqllite database.
  18. #18  
    As an average user I wouldn't attempt to do that. Heck I've had my phone for over a year and still am afraid to use Preware.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirlupkelly View Post
    As an average user I wouldn't attempt to do that. Heck I've had my phone for over a year and still am afraid to use Preware.
    How can you live without preware? I could (and actually did) live without the app catalog. But preware?
  20. #20  
    I'm too afraid to do preware. What can I say? Do you live by me and can come help me because apparently I'm living in the the stone ages without it. LOL
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