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  1.    #1  
    Hey I'm selling my TP2 because I don't like it and decided to get a Palm Pre. Couple questions
    1. I'm buying it off ebay, so which one's are unlockable? At$t, Telsus? Bell? Verizon?
    2. How's the OS is it quick?
    3. IS the keypad spacious?
    4. I won't have internet on my plan, so i;; be mainly on wi-fi will that be an issue?
    5. Is it duralble?
    6. Would I have to pay to unlock it or is their software (not rebel sim plz)
  2. #2  
    Hey I'm selling my TP2 because I don't like it and decided to get a Palm Pre. Couple questions
    1. I'm buying it off ebay, so which one's are unlockable? At$t, Telsus? Bell? Verizon?
    2. How's the OS is it quick?
    3. IS the keypad spacious?
    4. I won't have internet on my plan, so i;; be mainly on wi-fi will that be an issue?
    5. Is it duralble?
    6. Would I have to pay to unlock it or is their software (not rebel sim plz)

    1. They should all be unlockable. I have personally unlocked the AT&T Pre Plus, so I know that works.
    2. It is decent, and from my experience it is much quicker than Windows Mobile, and a bit slower than Android and not as smooth all around. Of course that is my opinion and it could have a lot to do with hardware. It's real strength I think is multi-tasking and simplicity.
    3. Not at all. Of course that is very subjective and will depend on what you are used to. I have used several other devices with keyboards and most were superior to the Pre's. That has a lot to do with it's unique form factor.
    4. Like most smartphone OSs now, it is designed to work best with an always on connection. So, in that regard, you will probably find the same challenges as with any modern phone OS.
    5. I don't think so. I find the designed to problem proned.
    6. You will almost certainly have to pay if the carrier will not provide it to you. The only method that I know of that works is the Nextgenserver client software method. I would not recommend buying codes for the Pre, it is not likely to work.

    My opinions are based on using several types of Android and Windows based devices, along with using the Pre. I think webOS has a lot of potential, but it needs more devices, and it needs them fast.
  3. RMB175's Avatar
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    #3  
    1. Bell and Verizon are CDMA (not unlockable). Not sure about Telsus. At&T is GSM and can be unlocked. You will still not get 3G data with tmobile on AT&T Pre.
    4. Ideally, you need a data plan to activate the phone. There are ways to get past it, but requires a few tricks. Search about meta doctor on this forum.
  4. #4  
    1. Bell and Verizon are CDMA (not unlockable). Not sure about Telsus. At&T is GSM and can be unlocked. You will still not get 3G data with tmobile on AT&T Pre.
    4. Ideally, you need a data plan to activate the phone. There are ways to get past it, but requires a few tricks. Search about meta doctor on this forum.
    1. Who told you this? It is not true. CDMA is certainly unlockable, they are just tied to a different number, the ESN (or MEID I think it is called now) as opposed to the IMEI. Now, I have never unlocked a CDMA Pre, but I have unlocked other CDMA phones. I would be willing to bet they are just as unlockable as their GSM cousins, just like practically all other CDMA phones. The lack of 3G if used with T-Mobile is a drawback though, like you said. Not unbearable though, but you will notice a difference.
    2. Easy as pie to "activate" without a data plan, or even a SIM card, provided you have access to WiFi. I have done it several times. Run webOS Doctor, run Activation Bypass tool, boot up and sign in to your accounts using WiFI. Full App Catalog, etc. That being said, I don't know about the "activation" process on CDMA devices, since they tend to be more tied to a process through the carriers (register the ESN and what not). For GSM devices, there is no "activation" other than having a working SIM card with your carrier and the proper type of plan, then sign into what ever accounts you would like to use for e-mail, etc. Simple, and every time I have done it, has given me proper access to the App Catalog.
  5. RMB175's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by kmdub View Post
    1. Who told you this? It is not true. CDMA is certainly unlockable, they are just tied to a different number, the ESN (or MEID I think it is called now) as opposed to the IMEI. Now, I have never unlocked a CDMA Pre, but I have unlocked other CDMA phones. I would be willing to bet they are just as unlockable as their GSM cousins, just like practically all other CDMA phones. The lack of 3G if used with T-Mobile is a drawback though, like you said. Not unbearable though, but you will notice a difference.
    2. Easy as pie to "activate" without a data plan, or even a SIM card, provided you have access to WiFi. I have done it several times. Run webOS Doctor, run Activation Bypass tool, boot up and sign in to your accounts using WiFI. Full App Catalog, etc. That being said, I don't know about the "activation" process on CDMA devices, since they tend to be more tied to a process through the carriers (register the ESN and what not). For GSM devices, there is no "activation" other than having a working SIM card with your carrier and the proper type of plan, then sign into what ever accounts you would like to use for e-mail, etc. Simple, and every time I have done it, has given me proper access to the App Catalog.
    CDMA and GSM are two different technologies. CDMA phones can be flashed to be used with a different CDMA carrier, but can't be used on a GSM provider.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by RMB View Post
    CDMA and GSM are two different technologies. CDMA phones can be flashed to be used with a different CDMA carrier, but can't be used on a GSM provider.
    a). T-Mobile USA and AT&T use GSM technology.

    b). Verizon, Sprint and Bell Canada use CDMA technology (Bell Canada is deploying a GSM network but the Palm Pre device they offer is the CDMA varient).

    c). you can do whatever you want to call it to a CDMA device, (most call it flashing it to work on another SPECIFIC CDMA carrier) but there is no way a device designed to work on a CDMA network will be able to function on a GSM network. THEY ARE TWO DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES.

    d). When you UNLOCK a GSM device, you unlock it so it can be used on ANY GSM CARRIERS NETWORK. (Unlike a CDMA device which must be flashed to work on aother SPECIFIC CDMA carriers network)

    WHAT YOU HAVE HERE IS TWO DIFFERENT DISCUSSIONS FOR TWO DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGIES. KAPICHE?

    To answer the OP's question, if you wnt to use a Pre on T-Mobile, you need to buy a GSM version (AT&T, O2, SFR,TELCEL - ROGERS CANADA PRE 2) then get it unlocked so it will work on any GSM carrier. Unfortunately because T-Mobile uses their own flavor of 3G HSDPA + that relys on a unique use of the 2100 3G frequency band, none of the carrier devices I mentioned will offer you 3G data connectivity on the T-Mobile data network, only 2G EDGE data transfer speeds will be possible. It sounds like you plan to utilize Wi-Fi connections anyways. As mentioned in another post, Meta doctoring the device will be required to get through or past activation.

    Do not buy a CDMA Pre thinking you can flash it to work on T-Mobile's network, it cannot be done.



    For those of you who like me are techies, you may have heard about comm boards being swapped. That's true, and does work, however sapping out comm boards on a Pre falls into a completely different discussion than flashing or unlocking the hardware already inside a device.

    Taking the comm board from a GSM device and swapping it into a CDMA device is doable, but for only the mechanically/technically inclined.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I am an AT&T employee and the postings on this site are my own and donít necessarily represent AT&Tís positions, strategies or opinions.
  7. #7  
    d). When you UNLOCK a GSM device, you unlock it so it can be used on ANY GSM CARRIERS NETWORK. (Unlike a CDMA device which must be flashed to work on aother SPECIFIC CDMA carriers network)
    Listen guys, I think we are making this way too complicated. There are some factual errors here that I would like to clear up.

    1. There is nothing inherent in CDMA that prevents them from being unlocked just like GSM/UMTS devices. I assumed that we all understood that they are two different technologies that are only compatible with one type or the other. Of course you have to use a CDMA device on a CDMA network, and the same with GSM/UMTS. However, this has nothing to do with unlocking the devices. You certainly can (provided the carrier allows you to, which is often the problem with CDMA devices) use a standard CDMA phone a another standard CDMA carrier. No flashing is required in most cases. For CDMA, it is mainly a matter of if the carrier will allow it, which they may not. The concept of subsidy locks (what we mean when we talk about unlocking) apply to GSM/UMTS and CDMA devices equally. The primary hassle is that with CDMA devices the ESN is used to identify the subscriber's authorization to be on the network, which is often also associated with an account. This is not typically done with the IMEI in GSM, although it could be done that way. SIM cards are typically used to identify subscribers in GSM/UMTS. THE TECHNOLOGY INVOLVED, WHETHER CDMA OR GSM/UMTS HAS NO INHERENT EFFECT ON SUBSIDY LOCKS. I have personally unlocked CDMA phones for use on other carrier networks without flashing. If the carrier allows it, it can be done just as with GSM.

    Unfortunately because T-Mobile uses their own flavor of 3G HSDPA + that relys on a unique use of the 2100 3G frequency band
    Ok, this is not actually correct. The band that T-Mobile uses is not unique, and it a standard UMTS band. Band IV to be exact. It is actually a combination of frequencies near 1700Mhz (uplink) and 2100Mhz (downlink). It is just not widely deployed outside of the U.S. now. And may never be. However, in the U.S. at least one other carrier (AT&T) owns significant spectrum in this band. There are several standard UMTS frequency bands (I-XII) I think, maybe more or less. Band I=2100Mhz, Band II=1900Mhz (PCS; AT&T uses this among others), Band III=1800Mhz (DCS), Band IV=1700-2100Mhz (AWS; T-Mobile uses this), etc. There are so many since there are many different regulations and frequency allocations around the world. There are CDMA networks deployed in the AWS spectrum also. The frequencies themselves are not tied to one specific technology.

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